Asked on Sep 05, 2013

Anyone know what the name of this wild vine is?

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Answered
I've seen it on the wilder portions of our property and it has twined around my porch railing. It's rather pretty. Heart-shaped leaves, little cream colored flowers. I live in New York State.
anyone know what the name of this wild vine is, flowers, gardening
anyone know what the name of this wild vine is, flowers, gardening, Close up of the leaves and flowers
Close up of the leaves and flowers.
  20 answers
  • Mary Law Mary Law on Sep 06, 2013
    Looks like Carolina Jasmine

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson) 360 Sod (Donna Dixson) on Sep 06, 2013
    Leaves look too fat and blooms are not right for a Carolina Jasmine.

  • Penn Harvey Penn Harvey on Sep 06, 2013
    I have it & now have medium sized chayote like bulbs on it. Not a chayote, I looked it up.

  • Thanks everyone! I think I've found the name of this vine, via a reader of my blog. It's Polygonum Scandens, part of the buckwheat family. And it's invasive, unfortunately!

  • Very invasive. If you pull it out, try not to let its seeds drop. Or you''ll be pulling it out again!

  • Kay Love-Wood Kay Love-Wood on Sep 07, 2013
    Not Caroline Jasmine for sure, cause it has a bright yellow bloom and a thicker leave. Is Scandens just active in your zone???

  • Cathie J Cadman Cathie J Cadman on Sep 07, 2013
    It's a type of Jasmine!

    • See 2 previous
    • @Jill Cooper Thank you for your kind offer, Jill. Since I live in NY State, I don't think it would do well here. xo

  • Gretchen Gretchen on Sep 07, 2013
    If the seeds scattered, you can use a pre-emergent like Preen in that area to keep them from germinating!

  • Peg Peg on Sep 07, 2013
    Claudia, it does look like Polygonum Scandens/ climbing buckwheat. Does it have reddish vines? We see a lot of it near damp, wet areas. I'm also from NY, maybe an hour or so from you, this plant is a pest.

  • Sondra Sondra on Sep 07, 2013
    I think it's lovely. It's a pest, only if you don't like it...same for some weeds. I read that somewhere.

  • Cathie J Cadman Cathie J Cadman on Sep 07, 2013
    @Claudia of Mockingbird Hill Cottage, thank you for the right information!

  • Cheryl Cheryl on Sep 08, 2013
    It is like the bindweed & you don't want the flowers or even parts of the vine to be left. BURN every piece you have of it as it doesn't compost away unless you put it in a bucket of water to rot 1st which smells awful. It comes again & again. Good luck to you on getting rid of it!!!

  • Julie Julie on Sep 08, 2013
    This vine is in my garden for the first time! I have not seen it here in any of my gardens before. Thanks to everyone on this site I now know what ( safe disposal) do do with it. I left my shop property for two weeks and returned to find the front garden covered with it. It's a monster!

  • Patty A Patty A on Sep 08, 2013
    i asked a question months ago on identifying this same plant...it comes up each year and climbs my deck railing,and turns a beautiful red in autumn. I have had no trouble whatsoever with spreading. It remains in a pot on my deck and the flowers that fall do not germinate. Enjoy it.

  • Mary Law Mary Law on Sep 09, 2013
    Carolina Jasmine

  • Martha Beltz Martha Beltz on Sep 11, 2013
    It's a weed,it will choke your other plants! it produces a fruit that looks like Chayote squash,,,but isn't,it has fluffy white stuff inside the pod

  • Rosanne Rosanne on Apr 16, 2014
    I can see that it has white flowers and c Jessamine has yellow flowers

  • Mary Law Mary Law on Apr 19, 2014
    Perhaps it's Angel Trumpet Vine?

  • Sally Roesner Fuhr Sally Roesner Fuhr on Apr 19, 2014
    It is not angel trumpet vine. BTW, all parts of the angel trumpet are poisonous. It is a close cousin of jimson weed! Jimson weed blossoms smell wonderful too. Ranchers call it locoweed because it induces hallucinations--even in animals.

  • Thanks for the recent contributions everyone, but if you scroll up this post you'll see I identified it back in September. It's Polygonum Scandens and it spreads very quickly.