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How do I keep centipedes out of my house?

17
Comments
Almond Joy Last reply on Oct 18, 2016

I was bitten by one years ago and it was very painful. They seem to appear in the tub and I don't like taking showers with them.

10  of  17 comments
  • Yvonne B
    Yvonne B Thomaston, GA
    on Jun 22, 2013

    But I do believe these bugs are attracted to damp and humid areas, maybe some damp-rid to pull out the moisture and then some diatomaceous earth to help control the one's that wander back in. You can use natural pesticides like boric acid or food grade diatomaceous earth for continual centipede control. Products containing plant-derived pyrethrin will exterminate centipedes on contact, and can be used as a fog or spray. Even though these products shouldn't kill pets or humans, it's best not to have prolonged contact with them.

  • Linda Snodgrass
    Linda Snodgrass Winters, CA
    on Jun 23, 2013

    You could try some Boric Acid. I use it for everything that crawls and it works great. It doesn't harm pets or children. I would try some around the toilet and inside the tub for awhile and see how it works for you. My hubby explained to me that it's like the jumping into a swimming pool full of razor blades. Sounded GREAT to me, that's one way for them to go.

  • Marie Worley
    Marie Worley Arlington, TX
    on Jun 23, 2013

    House Centipede Control Kill centipedes or capture them on sight—if you can. Their rigid bodies and freakishly long, numerous legs make them very fast. But centipedes don't usually invade homes in enormous numbers, so if you don't see them often and you eliminate the one you're looking at, you may have just taken care of your centipede problem. If you don't want to kill the centipede, but you want it out of your space, you can capture it in a jar and take it outside. Otherwise, spraying it with an aerosol insecticide that claims to kill centipedes—or simply squishing it—will do the trick. Get rid of other small household pests, and centipedes will move to someone else's house, where there's more to eat. Keep your house dry. Centipedes dry out and die if they don't stay in a moist environment, so if you clean up damp closets and basements, and use dehumidifiers, centipedes will find a more hospitable place to live. Use sticky traps. Put them in corners along the floorboards, where centipedes often hunt, and the traps will capture not only centipedes, but house insects as well. This will help you determine which other pests you need to eliminate, to deprive the centipedes of prey. Close off entrance points. Keep centipedes from entering your house in the first place by sealing cracks in the foundation and concrete walls, eliminating spaces around doors and windows, and covering basement floor drains with window screen. Chemical Centipede Extermination If you aren't satisfied with just keeping these creepy-crawlies out of your space, and you want to know how to kill centipedes, keep reading. If your only beef is with centipedes inside your house, you can put a powdered residual insecticide such as Drione in the places where centipedes usually hide, like in wall cracks, dark corners of the basement, crawl spaces, and under furniture. Keep in mind that centipedes will have to walk across an insecticide accidentally; because they usually go after moving prey, they aren't susceptible to baits. You can discourage centipedes from even going near your home by coating the bottom few feet of the side of your house, and soaking at least a five-foot band of soil around the house, with an outdoor residual spray insecticide such as Talstar or Demon WP. If you don't even want to encounter centipedes in your yard, be sure to spray the whole lawn and any mulch you use for gardening or landscaping. Remember, though, that insecticides alone will only work temporarily. If your yard and house are still cluttered, damp, and full of tasty bugs, the centipedes will find you again.

  • Bobbie
    Bobbie Cleveland, OH
    on Jun 27, 2013

    They are a sign of a water problem somewhere in your house. I would definitely investigate that! I had a terrible problem with them for a long time before I discovered that the roof had issues I didn't know about. If you don't mind chemicals, Terro spray is the absolute best! I had a golden retriever at the time and it didn't affect her at all. You only need to spray the edges - everywhere, they love to run along baseboards where they can hide. If you spray all the edges every 3 - 4 months, you won't see any spiders or bugs. I swear by the stuff!!!!!

  • Lisa Baker Burger
    Lisa Baker Burger Queensbury, NY
    on Jan 6, 2015

    THOSE PUPPY EYES ARE SO STINKING CUTE <3 <3 <3

  • Deborah M Sheedlo
    Deborah M Sheedlo Escanaba, MI
    on May 15, 2015

    what kind of puppy?

  • Capernius
    Capernius Laporte, IN
    on May 15, 2015

    I did some research & this is what I learned. Please keep in mind that all of this information was copied from: http://www.ehow.com/info_8254753_natural-products-repel-centipedes.html natural bug repellant MINT*Mint is a wonderful insect repellent/killer. Mint deters nearly every type of bug -- and centipedes are no exception. Essential oils - vanilla, tea tree oil*a few drops of tea tree oil on windows and the bottom of doors will keep centipedes away for months* Diatomaceous Earth (food grade): Bug Killer You Can Eat! I hope this helps.

  • Joan Scharf
    Joan Scharf
    on Jun 1, 2015

    I learned that centipedes are carnivores and eat the small bugs in your house. So they say to make sure you get rid of ants and small spiders, then when the centipedes have nothing to eat, they leave. I also got sticky traps at Lowes made for small crawling bugs and put some in the basement. Caught a few of them and didn't see them again for a long time. I did see a couple recently though, think it's because of all the spring rain. Will have to go buy more sticky traps. Just put them where a pet can't go cause of they get their feet stuck on those you''ll pull the skin right off their pads trying to remove the trap.

  • Faezeh
    Faezeh Schenectady, NY
    on Jul 28, 2015

    So nice . . .

  • Faezeh
    Faezeh Schenectady, NY
    on Jul 28, 2015

    So nice . . .

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