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Mailbox Makeover

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Mailboxes generally have the same look around where we live: a plain mailbox on a plain post which is so not my personality or style. After nearly 5 years of looking at our ratty mailbox and post, I decided to vamp it a little and I'm so pleased with how this fairly easy project came out!
Time: 2 Hours Cost: $35 Difficulty: Medium
BEFORE:
This is the mailbox that came with the house when we bought it almost 5 years ago and clearly it needed some TLC!

SUPPLIES:
-4 (1x4x8) pine boards *Note: We purchased 6 but returned 2.
-1 (2x4x8) board
-measuring tape
-Behr exterior semi gloss paint (Color: Cherry Cola)
-vinyl black/silver numbers
-2 (2.5" wood screws)
-DeWalt reciprocating saw
-2" paint brush
-18 gauge brad nails
-nail gun
-DeWalt chop saw





STEP 1: Measure and cut 1x4x8 boards
First, Rob measured how wide we wanted our planks to be which turned out to be 16". Then, he cut the planks to size using a chop saw. If you don't have power tools, you can do this with a manual saw or see if the hardware store where you purchase your wood will do this for you.
STEP 2: Measure, fit and secure post
Next, I measured from the ground to the end of our existing mailbox post. This would determine how much I needed to dig into the ground in order to fit in our support post.
STEP 2: Measure, fit and secure post
Next, I measured from the ground to the end of our existing mailbox post. This would determine how much I needed to dig into the ground in order to fit in our support post.
Once I had a measurement, I dug a small hole with a shovel...
Once I had a measurement, I dug a small hole with a shovel...
...then, wedge in the support post underneath our existing mailbox post.
Finally, I used 2.5" screws (one on either side) to secure the support post to our existing post.
Optional: I didn't want the little piece of our existing post sticking out the back any longer so I used a reciprocating saw to cut it off in order to make the tall part of the existing post flat.
STEP 3: Install planks
After my support post was secure, I started installing the 16" planks Rob had cut for me. I used 2 nails for each end of the planks.
In order to ensure the planks were evenly spaced apart, I lined one end of the plank to the front of the existing post, secured the plank with nails, then used 2 scrap pieces of wood as wedges to space the plank above to the next plank.
Then, to ensure that the planks were even with each other, I used an extra plank to line then up from the back.
STEP 4: Paint
Hindsight, I would have painted my planks before installation but at the time, I was clueless as to the look I was going for so I decided to install the planks first in hopes inspiration would come to me. I decided to use the same paint I used on our front door (and the sliding barn door inside) to tie in the mailbox with the house. I used Behr exterior semi gloss paint in a deep red color called "Cherry Cola".
Optional: Because the numbers on our mailbox looked a hot mess and they were basically baked onto our mailbox, I simply grabbed new numbers (the same kind we originally had) and applied them over the original numbers. Our mailbox was in decent shape and I liked how the white popped against the red so I decided not to get a whole new mailbox. The sky's the limit with the numbers though! If you want a plain mailbox, you can get nice numbers to install on the planks but I felt that look was too modern for the whole look of our house/style.
I'm so in love with our "new" mailbox! It was so simple to give it a unique facelift without breaking the bank and it ties together with our house now instead of sticking out like a sore thumb.

Materials I used for this project:

  • 4 (1x4x8) pine boards   (Home Depot)
  • 1 (2x4x8) board   (Home Depot)
  • Measuring tape   (on hand)
See all materials
  • Brenda Pyles
    Brenda Pyles
    on Jul 3, 2017

    I tried to post an answer to this but page reloaded so I think it was lost. As a retired carrier I can say this is not a good idea to add anything to the front side of your box. It extends out in front past the post for a reason and that is so the carrier can get in close to serve it. Putting anything on the front side means the carrier is going to scrape fenders on it. We always refused to serve boxes with anything in front of them. Including flowers

    • Pasovasz
      Pasovasz
      on Jul 3, 2017

      PO has regulations for mailing and receiving mail. It is not a question of "liking" the mail box. It is a question of safety and efficiency.

  • Tcbourret
    Tcbourret
    on Jul 3, 2017

    The big road snow plow would smash this in the first big snowstorm in Canada!!!

    • Lillian Miller
      Lillian Miller
      on Jul 3, 2017

      There are people in Michigan that are putting up a barrier before their mailboxes to deter the plows from hitting or burying their mailboxes with snow or the plow.

  • Vonda.braden
    Vonda.braden
    on Jul 3, 2017

    I love it

  • Tommyltyson
    Tommyltyson
    on Jul 3, 2017

    Looks like wood pallets would be same effect and a lot less work and exspence

  • Brenda
    Brenda Levering, MI
    on Jul 3, 2017

    I agree with Lillian

Inspired? Will you try this project? Let the author know!