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Tiling bathroom floor

18
Comments
Home Repair Tutor Last reply on Jul 22, 2012

I'm planning on tiling our bathroom floor this summer. Floor is on 2nd floor, wood and linoleum. Do I need to put down anything before I tile and what do I do around toilet?

10  of  18 comments
  • Mark Potter
    Mark Potter Pleasant Valley, NY
    on Jul 16, 2012

    Yes indeed Woodbridge, ditra, and or cbu I like to call fillers are for that purpose both placed in thinset bed. Although I have tiled on plywood alone with no issues I wouldn't recomend it as a DIY project it gets really complex.

  • Home Repair Tutor
    Home Repair Tutor Pittsburgh, PA
    on Jul 18, 2012

    Great discussion, I use 1/4" Hardiebacker over linoleum as long as the new install isn't going to be higher than the existing flooring in the next room. I scuff up the linoleum first before using thinset, then Hardiebacker. My preference on screws is to use the ones specifically made for the Hardiebacker.

  • Woodbridge Environmental Tiptophouse.com
    Woodbridge Environmental Tiptophouse.com Colonia, NJ
    on Jul 18, 2012

    If I was to approach this issue, I would if the linoleum height was low enough and the floor strong enough, I would simply treat the linoleum as a vapor barrier, nail down wire mesh and put a thin mud floor down then tile. But realistically I would fear the underlying floor would not be strong enough so I normally tear everything out and rebuild. There are many methods that will work and last, but each is dependent upon the conditions we find ourselves in when doing the job.

  • Home Repair Tutor
    Home Repair Tutor Pittsburgh, PA
    on Jul 18, 2012

    One question for everyone, what is your method for tearing out a floor like this? For example, do you simply just cut small squares with a circular saw and pry them out or is there an easier way?

  • KMS Woodworks
    KMS Woodworks Nederland, CO
    on Jul 18, 2012

    If the subfloor needs to come out I rip "bays" out between the joists with a circular saw...then come back and pry up the strips of floor set on the joist tops...these smaller strips often come out as splinters...this is a more controlled demo over trying to get larger chunks out...its also easier on the back by not having to lift or pry large pieces.

  • Mark Potter
    Mark Potter Pleasant Valley, NY
    on Jul 18, 2012

    I never would recomend anything relaying to tile on linoleum scuffed or not, unless you use a fortified thinset but that's still risky. your better off taking it up then using a belt sander. unless the subfloor is plank flooring or is old and  Past it's age you can usually go over it if it's ply or osb but with only more wood if it's a single layer then its most likely 3/4". If there is ever a hight issue for me anyway I usually use ditra or A/C ply. But your tile is only as good as the structure you put it on. It gets complex with staggering and grain deflection.

  • KMS Woodworks
    KMS Woodworks Nederland, CO
    on Jul 19, 2012

    I just pulled some lino up the other day in a Kitchen tiling project...the sheet product was set on older 12 square. The sheet material separated leaving the cardboard like middle exposed...I thought I was going to have a bugger of a time getting that up...but lucky for me ( and the client) this was set over old VCT which was set with the old black tar type adhesive...this was dry and failed....a 4" drywall tapping knife lifted the old VCT's with the 1/2 layer of the sheet product on top...I had the whole kitchen stripping in about 20 minutes....This remodel is in a 3 rd floor condo that has a concrete slab...the tile I set is now looking sweet and bomb proof.

  • Home Repair Tutor
    Home Repair Tutor Pittsburgh, PA
    on Jul 20, 2012

    KMS, Post your pics of the new tiling project, I like bomb proof for rentals. LOL

  • KMS Woodworks
    KMS Woodworks Nederland, CO
    on Jul 20, 2012

    Still have a bit to go...I'll post when we get more finshed...the befores and after will knock your socks off....the owner keeps saying..." I should have raised the rent"

  • Home Repair Tutor
    Home Repair Tutor Pittsburgh, PA
    on Jul 22, 2012

    They should raise the rent, there is no better way to get value than to redo a bathroom or kitchen.

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