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How to Trim the Screw Posts on a Drawer Knob.

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I lived 55 years before I found out the easiest, best way to shorten the screw posts when I am replacing the knobs on a piece of furniture. Am I the only one who didn't know about this?
I always hated the very long posts on new knobs. I would go to the hardware store and search for a replacement piece. Big hassle.
It's simple. You just get out your wire trimmers. Everyone has wire trimmers. Even when I only had a hammer and screwdriver I had a pair of wire trimmers. But I never knew they had this special function.
Just find the appropriate hole for the size of the post. Insert the screw post and squeeze. Really hard. IMPORTANT NOTE: The screw should always be inserted at the printed side of the wire cutters. That is opposite of the way this one is inserted.
Ta Da! A trimmed screw post.
Much better. Now I won't scrape my hand or arm on it. Note - sometimes the cut looks crooked, but the integrity of the tread is intact. The nut always slips right on!

To see more: http://www.somewhatquirkydesign.com/2014/05/how-to-cut-screw-post-on-new-knobs.html

Ask the creator about this project

  • Chris aka monkey
    Chris aka monkey Mount Pleasant, TN
    on Jun 1, 2014

    @Somewhat Quirky well i got you beat i have lived 65 yrs and didn't know this thanks they have always aggravated the heck out of me xx

  • Jessica Smith
    Jessica Smith New Braunfels, TX
    on Jun 1, 2014

    Thanks! I came across this problem recently!

  • Analogman
    Analogman Cairo, NY
    on Jun 2, 2014

    I think it's great, but you might want to trim just a hair more. so that the screw does not stick out beyond the Nut.

    • Somewhat Quirky
      Somewhat Quirky Grosse Pointe, MI
      on Jun 2, 2014

      @Analogman Yep, you're right. I just get nervous that I'm going to cut it too short. And that's much worse than too long!

  • Sherry Ciolek
    Sherry Ciolek Blue Springs, MO
    on Jun 2, 2014

    If you turn the trimmers over and thread the screw through from the marked side, the end will not cut off crooked. This way it also clears the threads from the screw.

    • Somewhat Quirky
      Somewhat Quirky Grosse Pointe, MI
      on Jun 2, 2014

      @Sherry Ciolek Thanks Sherry. Now I can get them all perfect!

  • Sue A
    Sue A De Forest, WI
    on Jun 2, 2014

    This is news to me as well!! Thanks for the great tip, @No search results.Somewhat Quirky!

  • Lynn
    Lynn Bullock, NC
    on Jun 2, 2014

    now, if you were to take a file to the end of that bolt, it would be even more safe from scraps on the hand… and remove the larger fragments of metal that may just get imbedded in the skin if it were to be brushed up against while using the inside nob… it's a great thing you've done to remove the risk of injury

    • Bonnie
      Bonnie Lebanon, MO
      on Jun 2, 2014

      @Lynn There is a metal file called a "rasp" for this very job...

  • Bonnie
    Bonnie Eustis, FL
    on Jun 2, 2014

    I can't see what difference it would make as far as bumping it ...when the protruding thing above it sticks out just as far..so now you won't hit the bottom one just the top one??

  • Rita Hlasney
    Rita Hlasney Shell Knob, MO
    on Jun 2, 2014

    Wouldn't a bolt cutter work ?

    • Somewhat Quirky
      Somewhat Quirky Grosse Pointe, MI
      on Jun 2, 2014

      @Allan Purl Thanks for your input Allan. I wondered why sometimes the results were perfect and sometimes not so much. The amazing thing is that this doesn't destroy the thread.

  • Cortney
    Cortney Cumming, GA
    on Jun 2, 2014

    You can screw on an acorn bolt to finish the job.

  • Rita Hlasney
    Rita Hlasney Shell Knob, MO
    on Jun 2, 2014

    Thanks, good to know..

  • Allan Purl
    Allan Purl Winder, GA
    on Jun 2, 2014

    @ Somewhat Quirky The threads DO get damaged when you cut the screw, but when you thread it in from the side opposite the cut so that when you cut the screw, it stays in the cutters, the act of removing the screw brings the damaged threads back through the good threads of the cutter and straightens them back out. The material that the cutter is made of, is much harder than the screw. Backing the screw out through good, clean, and straight threads forces the damaged threads back into alignment.

  • Nancy Spencer Carlson
    Nancy Spencer Carlson Longview, TX
    on Jun 2, 2014

    I knew it, but had plumb forgotten! And thanks to @Allan Purl for the additional info. Ya'll are great!

  • Centrd
    Centrd Oceanside, CA
    on Jun 2, 2014

    wow...I did not know that...thanks so much for sharing!

  • Leida R
    Leida R Tampa, FL
    on Jun 2, 2014

    WOW! Good to know. Thanks!

  • Jo Anne Johns
    Jo Anne Johns Fort Worth, TX
    on Jun 2, 2014

    Aww, heck my cheapy wire cutter does not have this feature, guess I'll have to buy a better one ? But thanks for all the helpful hints ! Heading off to Ace Hardware!!LOL

  • Allan Purl
    Allan Purl Winder, GA
    on Jun 2, 2014

    @ Jo Anne Johns You'll pay around $20 for decent quality wire cutters. They will be able to cut and strip wire ranging in size from 18 to 10 awg ( AWG = American Wire Gauge), cut #6, #8, and #10 screws, and crimp solderless connectors. Some even have a pliers nose as well. Really good quality like those made by Klein Tools ( Klein is to an electrician what Snap-On is to a car mechanic) can cost more than $30 to $40.

  • Liliana Wells
    Liliana Wells Jackson, GA
    on Jun 2, 2014

    My husband has one of these tools. I never knew what it was for.

  • LaDonna Payne
    LaDonna Payne Lolo, MT
    on Jun 2, 2014

    I never knew that, now I will have to go find a screw and check it out... Thanks

  • Wendy Johnson
    Wendy Johnson Niles, MI
    on Jun 3, 2014

    Very interesting..I have to see if I have one of those. Thanks for all the info

  • Stephanie N
    Stephanie N Buffalo, NY
    on Jun 3, 2014

    I have this tool...and this issue with a screw. Problem solved. Thank you!

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