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DIY Wood Herringbone Counters

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I want to start by saying THANK YOU to all of you for your amazing comments and compliments after revealing the kitchen. You guys are the reason I love sharing on Hometalk. A few of you asked what my island countertop was made of and when I responded, I was asked for a tutorial. So... here it is!
While working on my kitchen island I knew I wanted to do something I haven't seen before. Something different. Something unique. Then it hit me. I walked into the garage, grabbed a few scraps of wood and started playing around. What I came up with was a herringbone pattern!
Time: 2 Days Difficulty: Medium
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  • diy wood herringbone counters, countertops, diy, how to, kitchen design, kitchen island, painting, woodworking projects
I began by laying a piece of plywood over the area. I opted for 1/2" because it gave more structure. I screwed it into the cabinet base - checking for level along the way (and adding shims as needed).
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Next, I did a rough layout of how I wanted the counters to look.
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I used wood glue and clamps to attach the side/edge pieces.
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Next I added the interior pieces. Since there wasn't a good way to clamp them down, I used 20 pound kettle bells and other weights from around the house to hold the pieces down. You could also nail the wood blocks into the plywood if desired.
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After everything was set (around 2 hours later), I added 1" x 3" trim along the sides, filled the gaps with wood filler and sanded.
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To achieve the final color, I began by staining the wood black walnut....
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Then I sanded it off. This step, for me, was vital because it allowed the stain to soak into the grain - giving the wood depth (If it were up to me, I would have probably just stopped here but the hubs hated it).
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Next I created a white/gray wash. I mixed 1 part Snowbound (SW) with 1 part Classic French Gray (SW) and 2 parts water. I brushed the mixture on with a foam brush.
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Next I brushed on a coat of ebony stain.
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I immediately wiped it off with mineral spirits. It took a couple of pours of mineral spirits to get to the final color, but we loved it in the end. And yes, I actually poured the mineral spirits on the counters and wiped it off.
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After getting the finish the way I wanted it, I added Watco Lacquer. I won't say this was an easy project - but only because my island has a lot of angles. If you are lucky enough to have a straight island, you could do this project in a weekend.
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The final product. The cost for this project has a lot of variables. I went with 2 inch thick wood so it cost a lot more than using standard 1 inch thick wood. I also used white oak instead of red oak (which is a bit more expensive). I had the mill plane and joint the wood so allI had to do was cut it to length. The entire kitchen was around $1200. The island was roughly half of that.

To see more: http://www.therozyhome.com/blog/diy-herringbone-wood-countertops

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