Can I use vinegar to clean urine stains on the rug?

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I have dog urine stains on my carpet, can I use vinegar to clean these stains?
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  • AvonelleRed AvonelleRed on Nov 24, 2014
    When my pet has an accident on the carpet, I use a regular carpet cleaner on it, followed by a generous amount of Hydrogen Peroxide poured straight onto the stain. You'll want to test a small, inconspicuous spot on the carpet first (think under a piece of furniture against a wall, or in a far corner), just to make sure that the peroxide doesn't fade the carpet. I've never had a problem with it changing the color of any carpet I've had, but I like to give that disclaimer just in case. What I do is first use the carpet cleaner with a microfiber cloth, then use the peroxide, again using a microfiber cloth, and I make sure to rub in all directions, not just back and forth. Use a clean dry cloth to blot it as dry as you can afterwards, then once it's fully dry, you can vacuum.

  • Sherrie Sherrie on Nov 24, 2014
    Hi! I was asked to try to help you, I always use the cleaning guidelines from the carpeting and rug Institute. This is not advertisement or recipes, this is what the Rug and Institute of America recommends for all carpet cleaning companies it is the cleaning guidelines for rug cleaners. What I posted below is from them. They give detailed instruction about removing many stains without damaging your carpeting. http://www.carpet-rug.org/About-CRI/CRI-Blog/April-2013/Pet-Urine-and-Carpet-Technical-Bulletin-from-the-C.aspx This is the link. I linked the page you need directly. They also have a list of cleaning products that will remove old stains. This is important because you have to consider what will and will not damage your carpet, and what will really remove stains and smells. One other thing you can do is go to a local carpet cleaning company that is certified and purchase their urine cleaner. Certified means it has to follow the guidelines set my the carpeting institute of America. Example Stanley Steamer. And purchase a urine remover. There are many products out there to remove urine over the counter but are not endorsed because they inky remove the surface stains and not the smell. Owners of even the best-trained pets will occasionally encounter pet urine accidents that leave urine stains on carpet. Often, the urine is not discovered until long after the accident. To treat urine-damaged areas, blot damp areas as soon as the urine is detected with plain white paper toweling. Apply a solution of 1/8 teaspoon of a liquid dishwashing detergent (non-bleach and non-lanolin) with one cup of lukewarm water, by saturating paper towels and blotting. Do not use automatic dishwashing detergent or laundry detergent. Then, absorb the moisture with a paper towel, rinse with warm water, and repeat the application of detergent. Continue rinsing and blotting with the detergent solution and water as long as there is a transfer to the toweling or improvement in the spot. Follow the detergent application with a solution of one cup white vinegar to two cups water and blot dry. Apply a half-inch layer of paper towels to the affected area, and weight down with a flat, heavy, non-fading object. Continue to change the paper towels frequently until the carpet is completely dry. Urine can affect the dyes used in carpet, although not all occurrences will result in a permanent stain. When urine spots develop slowly and are noticed after much time has elapsed, the dyes and carpet fibers may be permanently damaged. Pet urine, left unattended, can damage carpet in several ways. Moisture can weaken the bond between the layers of the carpet, allowing separation or delamination of the backing material to separate. Seam areas can be particularly vulnerable to damage and can separate. Another problem, especially with cat urine, is odor. Unless the cat urine can be completely removed, complete odor removal is unlikely. A number of products are available to combat odor, but some may simply mask the odor, and, in times of high humidity, the odor may reappear. Enzyme-based treatments are available at pet stores, veterinarian offices or other retail stores. (Refer to Pet Stain and Odor Removal products in the Seal of Approval Program) Some carpet manufacturers have developed backings that resist spills and even prevent the spillage from penetrating the carpet into the carpet cushion and, perhaps, the subfloor. Check with your carpet dealer about these products.

  • Carol Williams Carol Williams on Nov 30, 2014
    I have spray bottles with about half white vinegar and half water. I spray the area and put papertowels on top with something to weigh it down. Change towels a couple times. I have never had a problem with this on any carpet.

  • Suzy Suzy on Mar 18, 2015
    Wow! I did this the other day and it was amazing! I filled a spray bottle 3/4 full of white vinegar one tsp dawn detergant and a little water, u sprayed the area and sprinkled baking soda on , then left , I was gone for sev hours, when I got home that area full of baking soda was brown where apparently sage has used it more than once!! So I vaccumed up the soda ! Now to stop the dog from going there!