Can you please identify the style/era/wood of these 2 end tables?

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Hello friends, can you please help me identify the style, era, and wood of these 2 matching tables? They seem like "lamp tables" or end tables. No markings on them indicating maker. I haven't seen anything comparable online. Thanks!
q can you please identify the style era wood of these 2 end tables, home decor, painted furniture, repurposing upcycling
q can you please identify the style era wood of these 2 end tables, home decor, painted furniture, repurposing upcycling
q can you please identify the style era wood of these 2 end tables, home decor, painted furniture, repurposing upcycling
q can you please identify the style era wood of these 2 end tables, home decor, painted furniture, repurposing upcycling
q can you please identify the style era wood of these 2 end tables, home decor, painted furniture, repurposing upcycling
  6 answers
  • The wood appears to be maple. The style is Colonial or Duncan Phyfe. That dresser is also maple.

  • Doyle Tami Harmon Doyle Tami Harmon on May 04, 2015
    The wood is what I call "Hard rock maple" it is from the 1940-50's and the feet look to be colonial.

  • Ginny Valanzola Ginny Valanzola on May 04, 2015
    I believe the fancy edge classifies it as a pie crust table. My Mom had some. I am 70 so I think it would be 40-50 style

  • Angelia Christenson Angelia Christenson on May 04, 2015
    i know...beautiful and perfect for my needs!! ha...im jealous..ive been looking for two small end tables for a long time to get rid of two chunky upholstered and mirrored ones that are currently being used at an end table in one room and coffee table in the other. I do like the fact they have storage shelves but lord they are huge and we havent had that set of furniture they match in two sets of furniture!!! gross! those are adorable...have fun

  • Leeanne Leeanne on May 04, 2015
    Thank you everyone for all of your wonderful expertise. You solved my mystery.

  • Swan Road Designs Swan Road Designs on May 04, 2015
    Because of the style of the legs and the center carved spindle, they would be classified as Colonial/Early American. They are most likely a hardwood and, since the grain is not too pronounced, I would say they are maple. These types of tables were commonly made of maple because it was/is plentiful. They're not too old. Probably, as others have mentioned, date to around the '40s or '50s.