Asked on Sep 09, 2018

How can you make a water vapor/LED lights fireplace??

Painthead
by Painthead
+6
Answered
  9 answers
  • Lifestyles Homes Lifestyles Homes on Sep 09, 2018

    Can you attach a picture of one, please?

  • Cheryl A Cheryl A on Sep 09, 2018

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    Aug 11, 2013 - I'm trying to get a realistic flame effect similar to those of the ... effect but I would try using a mister of water vapor and LED lights and a blower.


    Most of the info I found does not tell you how to make your own but to buy and have it installed. Hope this helps some..


  • Painthead Painthead on Sep 09, 2018

    Thank you Cheryl A, Yes, I know about the opti-myst. Cost is high, and I wanted to make my own.

  • Linda Sikut Linda Sikut on Sep 09, 2018

    Hi Painthead,

    I spent some time searching online for information about building your own. The only thing I could find was the option to build your own "cabinet" or "holder" for the working unit. I suspect that since this is new technology, it will take the DIY community some time to figure out a way to make it. If you're okay making the base for the working unit, here's one that I found. There may be more out there, as well. I searched for 'make your own water vapor/LED lights fireplace'. Wishing you the best. -Linda

    https://www.dimplex.com.au/files/downloads/Opti-myst%20pro%20roll%20fold-AUS-0514.pdf

  • Paul L Paul L on Jun 25, 2019

    In the process of creating our own with some miniature humidifiers and either LED or halogen MR16 orange bulbs that other manufacturers use for a realistic fire hue.

  • Bonnie Sue Bonnie Sue on Sep 09, 2019

    Let us know how you did this when it's finished. I have been researching this as well.

  • Nicola Nicola on Dec 13, 2020

    I’ve made a couple of vapour fires and it’s really not that difficult, as long as you remember a couple of points: Mist makers, regardless of price, are all a bit hit and miss. Some will pump out tonnes of vapour for years on end while others will stop working for no apparent reason after a week - so I use the cheapest I can find on eBay, at $5 each you can afford to get a few spares. This type (like most) need to sit under the water, but they can’t be too submerged as they won’t work. The optimum level is for the sensor to be about 1cm below the water line. When operating they expel a jet of water upwards (the stronger this is the better they work), so you need to take this into account when choosing the container so this water won’t be landing outside of it as will quickly empty the reservoir if it does (and make a big wet mess!). The container also needs to be big enough to have several centimetres of space about the waterline as this is where the vapour actually forms. This space needs to be warm to hot and I’ve found getting this done right and done safely is the biggest challenge. You want the “flames” to rise but vapour, given it’s normally colder than the surrounding air, does the exact opposite. So the area when the vapour forms needs to be quite a bit warmer than the ambient temp of the surrounding area In order for the vapour to rise up and dance like flames. Some people use small computer fans to push the vapour upwards but I found the results with this technique unsatisfactory - even on the lowest fan setting the vapour is pushed upwards with too much force - the “flames“ are just vapour shooting upwards in a very uniform way, much like they do in a humidifier oil burner and it’s not very realistic. The only thing that I’ve had success with is using 12 volt incandescent or halogen light bulbs for their heat - LEDs don’t emit anywhere near enough heat - and of course they also provide the next requirement, the light..... some things to consider about your light/s, stick to 12 volts to keep things safe, there’s no avoiding they will be getting wet, and water + 240 v of electricity don’t generally go together all that well. The best colour is orange, or orange and some yellow, old school car indicator lights work well thi they can be hard to find. I’ve tried painting clear glass lights with a tonne of supposedly heat safe options, with limited success, they work for a bit but all seem to discolour sooner or later. Coloured Ink mixed into silicon and painted on kind of works, and helps waterproof the connections, though all the silicon, bitumen paint, even resin seals I’ve used have failed eventually, so when in operation I always consider the fire to be live, but thankfully I barely register a 12 volt shock....which reminds me, if you put your finger too close to the vapourier’s ceramic disk when it’s on it can hurt like hell, it feels like an electric shock and it frightened the beJesus out of me the first time I felt it. Apparently it’s not an electric shock, rather it’s an ultrasonic shock, who knew? 😉....what else? You want the light shining upwards, but keep it positioned below the base of any “fire” you build, which will have to have strategic gaps for the light and vapour to exit, Droughts and wind are not the fire’s friend, and they’re not that impressive under the midday sun, because everything has a way of moving around in water I find it’s best to permanently mount the mist makers in their position, same with lights and everything else because positioning is everything.... I’ve made four of these now, when ive finally got the working, in all honesty you can’t tell the flames from real ones. I’m hopeless at cataloguing anything, so all I’ve got is this clip of the mini fire I made. It was actually much harder getting it to work properly on such a small scale, bigger is definitely easier! Ive left the best till last, these might cost a fortune to buy but they cost, like, next to nothing to make!

  • Nicola Nicola on Dec 13, 2020

    I’ve made a couple of vapour fires and it’s really not that difficult, as long as you remember a couple of points: Mist makers, regardless of price, are all a bit hit and miss. Some will pump out tonnes of vapour for years on end while others will stop working for no apparent reason after a week - so I use the cheapest I can find on eBay, at $5 each you can afford to get a few spares. This type (like most) need to sit under the water, but they can’t be too submerged as they won’t work. The optimum level is for the sensor to be about 1cm below the water line. When operating they expel a jet of water upwards (the stronger this is the better they work), so you need to take this into account when choosing the container so this water won’t be landing outside of it as will quickly empty the reservoir if it does (and make a big wet mess!). The container also needs to be big enough to have several centimetres of space about the waterline as this is where the vapour actually forms. This space needs to be warm to hot and I’ve found getting this done right and done safely is the biggest challenge. You want the “flames” to rise but vapour, given it’s normally colder than the surrounding air, does the exact opposite. So the area when the vapour forms needs to be quite a bit warmer than the ambient temp of the surrounding area In order for the vapour to rise up and dance like flames. Some people use small computer fans to push the vapour upwards but I found the results with this technique unsatisfactory - even on the lowest fan setting the vapour is pushed upwards with too much force - the “flames“ are just vapour shooting upwards in a very uniform way, much like they do in a humidifier oil burner and it’s not very realistic. The only thing that I’ve had success with is using 12 volt incandescent or halogen light bulbs for their heat - LEDs don’t emit anywhere near enough heat - and of course they also provide the next requirement, the light..... some things to consider about your light/s, stick to 12 volts to keep things safe, there’s no avoiding they will be getting wet, and water + 240 v of electricity don’t generally go together all that well. The best colour is orange, or orange and some yellow, old school car indicator lights work well thi they can be hard to find. I’ve tried painting clear glass lights with a tonne of supposedly heat safe options, with limited success, they work for a bit but all seem to discolour sooner or later. Coloured Ink mixed into silicon and painted on kind of works, and helps waterproof the connections, though all the silicon, bitumen paint, even resin seals I’ve used have failed eventually, so when in operation I always consider the fire to be live, but thankfully I barely register a 12 volt shock....which reminds me, if you put your finger too close to the vapourier’s ceramic disk when it’s on it can hurt like hell, it feels like an electric shock and it frightened the beJesus out of me the first time I felt it. Apparently it’s not an electric shock, rather it’s an ultrasonic shock, who knew? 😉....what else? You want the light shining upwards, but keep it positioned below the base of any “fire” you build, which will have to have strategic gaps for the light and vapour to exit, Droughts and wind are not the fire’s friend, and they’re not that impressive under the midday sun, because everything has a way of moving around in water I find it’s best to permanently mount the mist makers in their position, same with lights and everything else because positioning is everything.... I’ve made four of these now, when ive finally got the working, in all honesty you can’t tell the flames from real ones. I’m hopeless at cataloguing anything, so all I’ve got is this clip of the mini fire I made. It was actually much harder getting it to work properly on such a small scale, bigger is definitely easier!

  • Ross Ross on Mar 22, 2021

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