How to cover up bad drywall

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  • Ken Ken on Dec 14, 2017
    So, what's "bad drywall"? Is it stealing the sofa's lunch money? I'm gonna say that you should not cover it, you should fix it. Not a lot of tools to buy and the skills are learn-by-doing. A big bucket of joint compound sells for less than $20 and you get to keep the bucket when you're done. Is this a great country or what?

    Of course that depends on just what is wrong. Come. Sit on my knee and tell me what's wrong.

  • Tom Crosby Tom Crosby on Dec 14, 2017
    Try wall paper.

  • Peter Peter on Dec 14, 2017
    I had sand-painted drywall on one wall (stupid idea from previous owner), and resurfaced the thing with 1/8" drywall... now it's 2 layers and smooth on top.
    If your wall is cracking, shifting or otherwise Damaged, have someone peel it off and Replace it. Covering it as I did should only be done if the structure beneath is sound and won't re-damage your efforts.

  • Kathy Kathy on Dec 14, 2017
    I hear you, Peggy! The walls and ceiling in my home are horrible. I am considering putting shiplap either on the walls or the ceiling. I'm also considering putting board and batten up on the walls.

  • You must find out what caused the problem: structural issues, leaks, abuse, etc. Each problem will require a different approach. Spending time and money to repair the wall if you have not figured out what caused the problem will be a waste of your time and money because the problem will come back. If it is just wear and tear, wash, rinse and wait for the wall to dry. Fill any nail holes and then sand patched areas smooth... then prime with a stain-block primer, dry and then paint the wall. If there is mold, find the source: is their a leak from the roof or an upper floor? Is the area humid from the climate you live in, etc. We once had mold in a closet that was from a hole that had been drilled in the floor, The hole was allowing humid air from the crawl space to enter the house. We filled the hole, cleaned with a mold killer (not bleach; products to kill mold can be found at Lowes and Home Depot or on-line); rinsed walls, dried walls and primed and painted. I have seen people put wall paper over structural cracks; the walls looked awful and they eventually had to repair a staircase that someone had removed structural sport from. The staircase slowly was sinking and taking the adjacent wall down with it. Again we need more info here.