Pamela F
Pamela F
  • Hometalker
  • Hinesville, GA
Asked on May 20, 2012

Could You Please Help Me Identify This Shrub?

Fiona PumiliaAjh8661574Donna Heinecke
+104

Answered

This has small tear drop type leaves and grows pretty pink flowers that turns brown and fall off.
A few years ago, I began a garden partly due to boredom and the other because I loved looking at the gardens in Savannah, Ga. Anyhow, I just planted all types of flowers and shrubs and didn't document them so I never knew what was growing in my gardens when asked. Now, I take pictures of them and document their names. This is the final one in my garden that doesn't have a name. Could you please help me identify it? Thank you:-D
could you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape
could you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape
This is how it looks today 2/9/2013
This is how it looks today 2/9/2013
107 answers
  • Tai D
    on May 20, 2012

    Looks like vinca

  • Deb R
    on May 20, 2012

    too "woody" to be vinca I think...

  • Terri H
    on May 20, 2012

    maybe a barberry or boxwood?

  • Kathy Z
    on May 20, 2012

    does it all bloom at once or continue to bloom?

  • Donna B
    on May 20, 2012

    Could it be a gardenia? Has it bloomed?

  • Gretta G
    on May 20, 2012

    looks like boxwood-does it have kind of a spicy pungent odor?

  • Terri S
    on May 20, 2012

    It does look like boxwood.....Some people say it smells like cat urine, very pungent, not pleasant...

  • Ryan D
    on May 20, 2012

    Vinca is a flower...not a shrub.

  • Sonia K
    on May 20, 2012

    yeah I agree too woody ... does it flower? ...kinda reminds me of a tea olive but stunted

  • Karen H
    on May 20, 2012

    Do boxwoods get flowers? She said it gets pink flowers...

  • Becky M
    on May 20, 2012

    Looks like wax leaf ligustrum. Does it bloom?

  • Sandra R
    on May 20, 2012

    Is it thorny? It looks like a berberis shrub.

  • Lena H
    on May 20, 2012

    this looks close. kinda like some type of boxwood http://www.goert.ca/propagation_guidelines/sites/default/files/images/Arc-uva-ursi-large.jpg tried to get the exact name of this one but can't find my way easily around that site. does it flower. have you seen it through seasons? that would help to identify it. gl!

  • Jodi S
    on May 20, 2012

    I think it might be Escallonia

  • Cheryl M
    on May 20, 2012

    I agree with Donna B. Gardenia

  • Debi M
    on May 20, 2012

    Donna, I can SWEAR it is not a gardenia...they have white waxy flowers,larger than those pictured here. I've had ligustrum before, the flowers looked different than these, I know its not vinca because it doesn't grow into a bush. Maybe boxwood, but I'm not positive.

  • Susan T
    on May 20, 2012

    some type of boxwood

  • Cindy F
    on May 20, 2012

    Could be boxwood or euonymus.

  • Christiane S
    on May 20, 2012

    Buford holly? I have boxwood and it has never bloomed.

  • Karen R
    on May 20, 2012

    a not so healthy azalea or something else in the rhododendron family

  • Kelly S
    on May 20, 2012

    looks like azalea from I can tell.

  • Bonne C
    on May 20, 2012

    leaves don't look right for a gardenia.

  • Dana C
    on May 20, 2012

    Maybe a camelia, they have pink blooms.

  • Rosemary N
    on May 20, 2012

    I think the leaves are too small for a gardenia; could be a barberry -- does the stem have stickers? How tall is it? How wide? This is intriguing.

  • Linda R
    on May 20, 2012

    What is the other kinda ground cover? Pachysandra???????

  • Karen H
    on May 20, 2012

    My guess is azalea, they sometimes sell them really really small for just a few dollars. As for keeping track of the plants as you put them in, I always cut the tag off of the plant or pot or keep the little plastic tag they place in the soil, the receipt for their purchase and a photo of their location.

  • Robin H
    on May 20, 2012

    That is definitely not a gardenia, nor boxwood, azalea or vinca. She needs to get better pictures up. Pink flowers? When? What time of the year? A pic of the flower could actually help you know.

  • Dana C
    on May 20, 2012

    The leaves look glossy and waxy like the camelia. The plant looks a little stunted, but plant food should help. The camelia blooms in fall/winter in the south. Mine bloomed around Christmas because of the cold weather.

  • David S
    on May 20, 2012

    Would have to be a type of azalea.

  • David S
    on May 20, 2012

    She mentions pretty pink flowers. Would be a type of azalea.

  • Patricia C
    on May 20, 2012

    If it blooms in the spring then it`s an azalea.

  • Michelle S
    on May 20, 2012

    I think azalea. Does it bloom in spring? Boxwood i believe have no or very small white flowers.

  • Alice E
    on May 20, 2012

    it kinda looks like my indian hawthorne

  • DeAnne T
    on May 20, 2012

    I think who ever said BOXWOOD is correct, I have three in my yard...

  • Carolyn F
    on May 20, 2012

    MY GUESS IS AZALEA ,I HAVE 3 PINK THAT BLOOMS IN SPRING.

  • Diana H
    on May 20, 2012

    I agree with azalea. Because the leaves and flowers of the azalea can vary so much, it would be a lot of help to get more info/pics. For instance, when does it bloom, does is drop it's leaves in winter months...etc.

  • Janice N
    on May 20, 2012

    How about a rhododendron?

  • Alice E
    on May 20, 2012

    Boxwood doesn't have pink flowers that I know of

  • Alice E
    on May 20, 2012

    if the flowers are those little brown clusters that kinda are showing in the background which is what the hawthorne does. Does it get lots of bees in spring??

  • Evelyn R
    on May 20, 2012

    I am pretty positive it's NOT a boxwood. The flower turning brown and falling off does sound like an azalea and the leaves also look like azalea. I have a huge boxwood right at the corner of my house/sidewalk - impossible to avoid it! It definitely does stink!

  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    Yes, they get light pink pretty flower that blooms but after a few months turns brown and fall. The closest picture that looks like them are Gumpo Azaleas but I don't know. Thanks everyone!

  • Trish W
    on May 20, 2012

    I'm thinking boxwood, azalea?

  • Merry O
    on May 20, 2012

    azalea

  • Karan F
    on May 20, 2012

    I agree it is in the Rhododendron family,, looks very much like the rhododendron I gave my Mother in law for Mother's day 6 years ago :)

  • Sam W
    on May 20, 2012

    I would just call it "Fred".

  • Linda A
    on May 20, 2012

    It really looks like a boxwood, except the flowering thing is weird, I have azeleas and boxwoods, boxwoods don't flower that I have ever seen and I have lived here for 20 years. Maybe it cross bred with something you planted, the leaves definately are boxwood.

  • Billie N
    on May 20, 2012

    Maybe an Indian Hawthorne. It is an vergreen that has pink blossoms

  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    I'll post more pictures. For years it was planted next to my wax leaf ligustrum but they grew really big so I replanted it there. It is about 1.5 feet tall. A few branches broke off but I'd say its about a foot wide now. It seems to never get any taller though.

    could you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape, The brown things used to be pink little flowerscould you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscapecould you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscapecould you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    I have an Indian Hawthorne and the leaves are must bigger than the leaves of this shrub so are the leaves of my wax leaf ligustrum.

  • Kathy C
    on May 20, 2012

    I think it looks like an Azalea, had quite a few at the old house...white, hot pink, light pink, purple, red...the leaves look the same. Definitely not a rhododendron, the leaves are not big enough for that.

  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    Thank you all! I've compared it to Gumpo Azaleas and I guess I will go with that. I will be more mindful about what I plant and continue to document them in the future.

  • The Blooming Gardener
    on May 20, 2012

    Azalea, there are a few species of Azaleas, very different leaves on some, like this. Gumpo Azalea or Kurume likely- definitely not, not, not boxwood, privet, gardenia, barberry, hawthorn, euonymus, escallonia or holly- and highly unlikely a camellia.

  • Sarah T
    on May 20, 2012

    it looks like ground cover sedum, if I am right it will get a little yellow flower or red on the top of the growth

  • DENISE M
    on May 20, 2012

    The leaf looks like a gardenia to me!

  • Dana C
    on May 20, 2012

    Now since you posted more pics, I think whoever said Indian Hawthorne might be correct.

  • Debi T
    on May 20, 2012

    The new pictures clearly identify it as an azalea, although which variety I am unsure. The glossiness of the leaves is confusing to those who think it is a gardenia; clearly not gardenia nor is it Indian Hawthorne. Take your leaf to a nurseryman but I am certain you have an azalea.

  • Pam
    on May 20, 2012

    Looks like Indian Hawthorne to me too. So do the little flowers, or should I say the past blooms.

  • Rebecca B
    on May 20, 2012

    I would have guessed boxwood as well if not for the blooms. My boxwoods do bloom but produce insignificant creamy white flowers in late winter/ very early spring.

  • Cyn87200
    on May 20, 2012

    My azaleas don't have waxy shiny leaves and the leaf is a different shape. I'd like to know when you find out what it is. You can send the photo to Birds and Blooms and they will identify it for you.

  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    the 1st leaf is from my Indian Hawthorne it is 2.5" from tip to bottom of stem and 1" wide. It blooms white flowers. The other leaf of that unidentified shrub is 3/4" from top to bottom and 1/2" wide. I also took pictures of the backsides. Does that help anyone? I so anxious to find out. I'll also go to Birds and Blooms for more info too...thanks.

    could you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscapecould you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscapecould you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Teresa F
    on May 20, 2012

    When do they bloom?; and I believe you are right; looks llke Gumpo Azalea. We planted some for a lady whom already had some, and after hunting for that particular kind, found them at a Nursery and that was what she had. Very pretty flowers, and leaves are small and good darker green color than most Azaleas.

  • Jodi S
    on May 20, 2012

    I am willing to bet that it is an Escallonia. We grow them as hedges here. Very common where I live.

  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    Teresa, I've seen flowers in the summer and late fall.

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on May 20, 2012

    check this link and see if the description fits that of a Serrissa foetida http://www.floridata.com/ref/s/seri_foe.cfm There is also a pink blooming form, a varigated one and one with a double pink flower.

  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    I think they are too because my leaves look just like these and the flowers are very similar. I'll post another picture when they bloom again.

    could you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape, Gumpo Pink Azaleas
  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    @ Four Season Nursery...WOW...it could be those too. I'm lost all over again. What is the difference between that and Gumpo Azaleas?

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on May 20, 2012

    The bloom on the Serrissa is very very small compared to the Gumpo Azalea.

  • Pamela F
    on May 20, 2012

    @ Four Season Nursery, I looked them up and all the pictures sort of have a cream or yellow like border around them but mine never gets a border like the Serissa. I don't think that it is this type. But, I could be wrong.

  • Dennis K
    on May 20, 2012

    Pamela if you see blooms a couple of times a year they are most more than likely the Encore variety. I have found many different Encore varieties. I am not sure how many there are.

  • John W
    on May 20, 2012

    [it is a anzala

  • Betsie D
    on May 20, 2012

    Can someone PLEASE tell me how to kill off bamboo. My neighbors are going to kill me if I don't get rid of it soon

  • Marcia M
    on May 20, 2012

    Azalea.

  • Marcia M
    on May 20, 2012

    Try Roundup full strenth and pour it on the roots. It spreads underground like Wisteria and continues to pop up everywhere.

  • Becky H
    on May 21, 2012

    Good luck Betsie. We had bamboo and ended up having to dig all the roots out; we never found any other truly effective way of getting rid of it.

  • Robin F
    on May 21, 2012

    my guess would be azalaes or rhodenendron. Both are bushy looking as well and have waxy looking leaves like this.

  • Debi M
    on May 21, 2012

    I have Indian Hawthorned and it doesn't look like this. I'm not familiar with all of the Hawthornes tho The center of the flower is different from Azaleas And Gardenias are white, not pink

  • Debi M
    on May 21, 2012

    the leaves looks similar to my rhodedendron and even the flowers resemble those. Maybe take a sample of your plant over to the local US Dept of Agriculture. They should be able to help you

  • Roxy D
    on May 21, 2012

    Azalea gets my vote.

  • Jodi S
    on May 21, 2012

    I'm telling you, it's an Escallonia. I am positive of it!!!!!!

  • The Blooming Gardener
    on May 21, 2012

    It is NOT an Escallonia even though the leaves look like it...the FLOWERS do NOT bloom on Escallonia the way this plant in the pictures do. (The drivethrough Starbucks has a hedge of dozens of Escallonias in bloom right now latitude 37, and if you saw them with this these pictures, you would have to agree this is NOT an Escallonia) I do love Escallonia, but it is not one.

  • Carol M
    on May 21, 2012

    I think it is a azalea. We have lots of different kinds , colors and shapes here in the Northwest.

  • Sonia K
    on May 21, 2012

    my first instict was an azalea also .. I think when it blooms and you look close you will be able to tell between escallonia andd azalea

  • Pamela F
    on May 21, 2012

    I think so too:-)

  • Pamela F
    on May 21, 2012

    I read that escallonia grows to 6-8 feet. It's been 3 years and it hasn't grown any taller. It must be a dwarf of a kind.

  • Alice E
    on May 21, 2012

    just fyi my indian hawthorne bloom pink-type in indian hawthorne on search and you can see all the different varieties and they have some that look just like yours-stem and all.

  • Pamela F
    on May 21, 2012

    WOW...I'm on my way to the Lowes Nursery where I purchased it from.

  • Pamela F
    on May 21, 2012

    I'm back...its in fact an Azalea Coral of the small variety. They actually had more so I bought 2 more! Thanks EVERYONE!

    could you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape, Azalea Coral Bellscould you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape, The leaves are very very similar just that I plucked a fatter one but there are some of the exact same size on eachcould you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape, Look closely I do believe that they are the same
  • Teresa F
    on May 21, 2012

    The Gumpo Azalea is a slow grower; and they will do really well when you plant them to mix in some BLACK COW Manure in with the soil at planting time. Lowes sells this in bags; I use it with everything I plant and have very good results with it.

  • Debi M
    on May 22, 2012

    glad that is settled! I have Formosa Azaleas. When we moved here 8 years ago they were probably 6 ft tall and "raggedy" looling. They had not been trimmed or shaped, just left to grow wild. A friend came over and shaped them, now they are about 4 ft high, rounded and very full. I was told that they are acid loving plants, so we piled pinestraw around them and they love it.

    could you please help me identify this shrub, flowers, gardening, landscape
  • Pamela F
    on May 22, 2012

    They look amazing...can't wait for mine to grow in that manner. I added cedar mulch but we cut down plenty of pine trees from our back and frontyards...I hope that our soil is just right for them to grow.

  • Sonia K
    on May 22, 2012

    yeah ! always happy when something gets figured out ... enjoy them

  • Jodi S
    on May 22, 2012

    Here is a picture of a dwarf escallonia

  • Pamela F
    on May 22, 2012

    It surely does look similar! I'll keep you posted when it blooms:-D

  • Bonnie M
    on May 23, 2012

    It's Indian Hawthorne. It blooms intermittently from Spring to Fall.

  • Jodi S
    on May 23, 2012

    Hawthorne is related to the rose and has thorns. I don't believe this has thorns. Doesn't appear to have.

  • Jodi S
    on May 23, 2012

    Your shrub seems to have glossy leaves and azaleas usually don't have a glossy leaf, in fact they are usually slightly furry so they are not. Escallonia does have the shinny leaves and the dwarf varieties don't get tall. They can have flowers ranging in color from white to dark pink, almost red.

  • Debi M
    on May 23, 2012

    Pamela, if you are sure it is a type of azalea, you can do the following to help it without spending money (1) sprinkle used coffee grounds around the bush during the growing period (2) Save your egg shells. I put mine in a qt jar w/a lid. break them up as you put them in the jar, adding enough water to keep the shells covered. When it is full, put them around the base of the azalea bush. It doesn't smell great, but the azaleas love it. My grandma taught me that trick years ago.

  • Pamela F
    on May 23, 2012

    @ Debi M thanks for that information, I am going to start saving my eggshells and coffee grounds.

  • Jodi S
    on May 24, 2012

    The picture of the azalea in the picture you posted aren't even close to the picture of the leaves in the shrub you are asking about. You can clearly see that the azalea leaves are not GLOSSY. Shinny maybe, but not glossy, and pointed where as the leaves in your original photo are more rounded, like escallonia. Escallonia leaves almost feel a bit sticky. Azalea leaves feel more papery.

  • Pamela F
    on Jun 14, 2012

    @ Jodi S....if and when it blooms, I'll post a picture. Secretly, I'm still wondering.

  • The Blooming Gardener
    on Feb 11, 2013

    It is an azalea...

  • Chris E
    on Aug 22, 2016

    I have one of these ina pot at home . The tag says it is an Indian Hawthorn. It is a lovely small pink flower for the spring -is very hardy for hot summers and is somewhat deciduous for our Melbourne climate.

  • Donna Heinecke
    on Oct 26, 2016

    Boxwood

  • Ajh8661574
    on Nov 26, 2016

    It looks like a geranium to me. I probably didn't spell it right'.
  • Fiona Pumilia
    on Jan 31, 2017

    Hi, sorry this is a late one, it is a Dwarf Japanese Azalea. I have two of these in my garden, the flowers are stunning but very fragile, rain or wind will demolish the flowers, however the shrubs themselves are very weather hardy and require little maintenance as they are very slow growers x hope this helps x
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