Marigolds growing! Should I pinch the buds?

+46
Answered

My marigold plants are growing. I heard that pinching the buds until Autumn will allow them to grow without killing the plant. Is this true?

q how do i get my marigolds to bloom
  37 answers
  • William William on Jun 07, 2018
    Pinch the flower heads after the have wilted. This forces the plant to grow fuller and new flower buds
  • Redcatcec Redcatcec on Jun 07, 2018
    Always pinch after the bloom has ended, you can then save the seeds from the dead bud for next year.
  • Joy30150932 Joy30150932 on Jun 07, 2018
    If you pinch the buds when they start to deteriorate then that is okay. More buds will come if you remove the old. This is usually good practice with any flowering plants.
  • Betty Betty on Jun 07, 2018
    I pinch after they bloom has ended .this year I take them to my tomatoes plants in the containers .I read on home talk the buds will keep pest away from the tomatoes plants .thought I would give it a try. .
  • Olive harte Olive harte on Jun 07, 2018
    I always allow mine to grow and seed and just take off the seeds and scatter them on the soil this way I have Marigolds all Sumer and up till November 1
  • Put chicken wire cloches over your marigolds at night to protect them from the bunnies and deer.

  • C.B. C.B. on May 07, 2017

    If you notice that the flower stem weakens & the flower falls over, it has too much moisture. The plant needs to dry out more between waterings. What's happening is that the plant gets too much water, the flower stem wilts, & the flower falls due to the inability to support the weight of the flower head...or the plant being in a draft or having been subjected to a sudden change from warm to cold will also do this [called 'dampening off']. If you have retained any of the flower heads, see if they have 'seed' in them, start new plants if they do have seeds.

  • Janet Pizaro Janet Pizaro on May 06, 2017

    Check to see if any insects are in the pots. Keep them in full sun, and do not let them dry out.

  • Just peachy Just peachy on May 12, 2017

    The main killer of plants is over watering. Try sticking your finger in the pot before you water. If it is damp or wet, don't water. If it is dry and inch down, water.

  • Douglas Hunt Douglas Hunt on Jun 01, 2013
    Slugs will definitely eat marigold leaves. Do an examination by flashlight at night and see if you see them.
  • Marigolds are an annual, and for most annuals, sowing the seeds in spring or indoors a few weeks before the last frost is ideal. There are many annuals like petunias and impatiens that will sometime reseed themselves and come back every year. If it's brutal in the winter where you live, you should wait until spring. Good luck

  • Douglas Hunt Douglas Hunt on Sep 24, 2014

    I would wait until spring until all danger of frost has past to plant your marigolds. They grow very quickly, so you don't really need to start them ahead of time indoors.

  • Joanne lueke Joanne lueke on Jul 27, 2018

    Marigolds need full sun to produce blooms.

  • E. Fisher E. Fisher on Jul 27, 2018
    Marigolds need full SUN. Try using a fertilizer for bedding plants and also check for slugs as they love to eat marigolds.

  • Kristi Kristi on Jul 27, 2018

    Cut back on your watering. Marigolds are extremely hardy, and are not particular about soil and do not need fertilizer of any kind to put on bloom. If a plant “thinks“ it’s going to die, it will bud and bloom to put on seed. They need at least half day‘s sun to set bud. It doesn’t matter which half, morning or afternoon. And overwatering will prevent this from happening.

    • Kristi Kristi on Aug 05, 2018

      And you should never water ANYTHING at night. It encourages fungal growth and slugs and snails. Soak the bed well in the morning not more than twice a week.

  • Ton10470755 Ton10470755 on Jul 27, 2018

    Again, dryish soil and full sun. Pull them and put them somewhere that gets sun. It's not the heat that makes them bloom - its actually the sun rays. When the blooms die, pull the heads and sprinkle them around wherever else you want them in dryish soil and full sun light. They need at least 6 hours of morning or afternoon sunlight.

    • Ton10470755 Ton10470755 on Jul 28, 2018
      You said sun in the morning, but how much? At least 6 hours? If not, pull them from the rest of your plants and replant them where it gets full sun.
  • Ron Ron on Aug 17, 2019

    pinch the tips off. that causes the plant to quit growing and start blooming.

  • Kimi Sharp Kimi Sharp on Mar 26, 2013
    I've found my marigolds will grow in almost any soil..
  • Douglas Hunt Douglas Hunt on Mar 27, 2013

    You can absolutely grow them in the soil in your garden. If you want to grow them in pots, it is always better to use a container mix than garden soil.

  • William William on Jul 13, 2018

    Yes, deadheading will promote more bloom growth. Otherwise you would get more foliage and limited or no blooms.

  • Fiddledd224 Fiddledd224 on Jul 14, 2018

    Yes. It's called "deadheading" and it encourages flowers to regrow. It also looks neater when the dead flower heads are removed.

  • Nancy Turner Nancy Turner on May 21, 2018
    They have to bloom to go to seed.
  • Kris Neumann Kris Neumann on May 22, 2018

    Marigolds are annual plants. You will need to replant them every year. It's possible they might reseed themselves, but usually they don't.

  • Sjt29229935 Sjt29229935 on May 22, 2018
    Sometimes you will find a few reseeds from the previous year but don't count on it. What did you do with your first batch of flowers? Did you let them reseed themselves or save the seeds? I haven't purchased marigolds since my first batch 30 years ago and have been been growing them from seed ever since.

    What you need to do is when the flower has dried, pinch it off just below the greem bulb below the flower where it joins the stem. The seeds can be found in the green part under the dried flower petals. Pull the dried petals off and some seeds may come out with the petals. I usually open the green bulb and you will find a ton of small seeds. They look like tiny needles. Two or three flowers will give you hundreds of seeds. Spread them on a tray and let them dry out in a garage or inside for a few days then put them in ziplock bags. If you don't allow the moisture to evaporate, they will mold in the bag over the winter. Then simply label and toss the bag on a shelf until next spring. You can divide them according to color if you want to keep seperate patches of color. When the weather warms in the spring, sprinkle the seeds on slightly roughed up ground and cover lightly with dirt. I usually plant them 1/2 - 1 inch deep tops. It should be shallow. All you have to do is water lightly and wait. You will have a million marigolds soon. I have replanted seeds the same year if you want a second crop. They are the easiest flowers to save I have ever seen.

    Have to tell you a quick story about my neighbor years ago. He always admired my prolific patches of marigolds, so I gave him a bag of seeds one year. In the spring, he came over and asked me which end of the seed should be planted up and how far apart. :-> I thought that was so cute and it gave me a giggle for the day. All I ever do is toss them on the ground whichever they land in any pattern that fits that area of the garden and say, "Grow dang it." And by gosh they do. I have done rows and patches depending on the garden design area. Enjoy and good luck with yours!
  • You could try and bring them indoors in the winter. I save the seeds and plant them the next spring.

  • Nancy Turner Nancy Turner on Nov 04, 2018

    I always kept seeds from mine in the winter and planted them the next year. You could try bringing them in, but they would need good light, perhaps a grow light to keep them going without the sunlight they received when they were outside.

  • Janet Pizaro Janet Pizaro on Apr 14, 2018
    you cannot sow seeds directly in the ground unless all possibility of frost is gone
  • Joy30150932 Joy30150932 on Apr 15, 2018
    Marigolds usually pop up from seed within a week or so, so you can either wait to see where the bare spots are or over seed and then thin if necessary.
  • Deanna Nassar Deanna Nassar on Sep 30, 2018

    Gather the dry flower heads and place in paper bag, store in dry, dark place.

  • Zard Pocleeb Zard Pocleeb on Sep 30, 2018

    My mother used to lay them out on a sheet of newspaper to dry real good. When they were dried sufficiently they went into a paper bag until spring.

  • Nancy Hawley Nancy Hawley on Sep 30, 2018

    Just harvest the dried seeds from the flowers and put in plastic baggies or small jars and label.

  • OceeB OceeB on Jul 21, 2018

    Marigolds are pretty hardy little rascals. They should do okay in both. I read that Marigolds are tolerant of poor soil, but it must be well-drained and if amending it with organic matter, like manure, will give the plants a head start.


    You could try breaking the ground up where you are going to plant them to about a 12 inch depth and mix good garden soil, some perlite, and peat moss into break the soil up and give some nutrients. Start composting adding egg shells etc when you think about it too. Coffee grounds are supposed to be good but do not know about the acidity (would need to read up)


    They are especially good in the garden

    https://www.hometalk.com/3996308/marigolds-in-the-vegetable-garden-yes-and-here-s-why

  • Cheryl Gillman Cheryl Gillman on Jul 21, 2018

    I have 2 marigolds in my front garden and the soil is awful, full of rocks etc, I just dug a hole, put some good potting soil in the hole first then put the marigolds in and filled the rest in with the good soil and they be been thriving since planted :)

  • Caitlin Caitlin on Sep 18, 2017

    With any seed storage, you want to keep them in a dry container and away from sunlight. I normally store seeds in a mason jar if I have a lot and in a cabinet.

  • Hb Hb on Sep 18, 2017

    seeds can be safely stored in either paper envelopes or little plastic baggies labeled and put in the door of your fridge or in the crisper .You must make sure that they are well dried otherwise you run the risk of mold forming and destroying the seeds. I always leave my seeds heads to dry in the house for at least a week then harvest the seeds and let sit for another week . Then pop them into the envelopes and/or baggies and pop in the fridge.I collect a lot of seeds so the little envelopes or baggies go inside a larger sandwich bag so that they are not all over the place .
  • Roxaneg Roxaneg on Sep 18, 2017
    After collecting the dried flowers, open the pods and remove the seeds. Set them out on a paper towel to dry in a cool, dry location. Once dry, store in an envelope to prevent them from molding or rotting. Keep in mind that if you have hybridized marigolds that the seeds won't give you a clone of the original plant.
  • Little Sprouts Learning Little Sprouts Learning on May 15, 2019

    It takes 3-10 days for marigold seeds to come up in pots