How to clean pan that was in the dishwasher & left with a white tone?

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My daughter put a pan in the dishwasher that she shouldn't have. The bottom of the pan has q whitish tone...it isn't a film, but it won't just wipe off either. How can a clean this and restore back to original?

  7 answers
  • Carol Thomas Carol Thomas on Mar 26, 2018
    What is the pan made of?
  • A photo would help too.
  • Amanda Amanda on Mar 26, 2018
    Hello. You can try bar keepers friend. It works very well for me.
  • Ebbjdl Ebbjdl on Mar 26, 2018
    What is the pan made of ? Non-stick, stainless steel, copper, etc
  • 34312389737 34312389737 on Mar 26, 2018
    Thank you all for your input and help!
  • Carol Thomas Carol Thomas on Mar 27, 2018
    Oh, i see. As you have found out, putting those in the dishwasher is a no-no. The good news is that your cookware is probably perfectly useful. The bad news is that you are stuck with cookware that is going to look a little gnarly, and might react with particularly acidic foods.
    The anodization process involves building a thick dense layer of oxidation that is crystalline (basically sapphire) which is tough and non-reactive to foods, most of which are acidic, but soluble in an alakaline environment, like your dishwasher.
    Normal aluminum oxidation (the chalky white stuff) is a chemically different substance -- it is thin, weak, and washes off. (Consider that graphite and diamonds are both pure carbon -- and otherwise entirely different!) It is easily scoured off, exposing the shiny metallic aluminum beneath. Metallic aluminum is soft and reacts with foods -- not a good thing for cookware.
    Anodization involves sulfuric acid dips and a healthy source of DC power -- way beyond a DIY project. If you know somebody in the curtainwall business, they might be able to sneak your pots onto the line. No guarantees that you will have something safe for cooking food, but it will look nice.
    If having ugly cookware drives you nuts, or if it is misbehaving (turning your mashed potatoes a lovely shade of grey, for instance), then chunk it and start over. Otherwise, relax and cook 'em into the ground.


    • See 1 previous
    • Carol Thomas Carol Thomas on Mar 29, 2018
      Happy to be able to help you. I've surely messed up some of my pans over the years!
  • Carol Thomas Carol Thomas on Mar 27, 2018
    The good news is that your cookware is probably perfectly useful. The bad news is that you now have cookware that is going to look a little rough, and may react with very acidic foods.
    The anodization process involves building a thick dense layer of oxidation that is crystalline (basically sapphire) it is tough and non-reactive to foods, most of which are acidic, but soluble in an alakaline environment, like your dishwasher.
    Normal aluminum oxidation (the chalky white stuff) is a chemically different substance -- it is thin, weak, and washes off. It is easily scoured off, exposing the shiny metallic aluminum beneath. Metallic aluminum is soft and reacts with foods -- not a good thing for cookware. If having ugly cookware drives you crazy, or if it is turning your mashed potatoes a lovely shade of grey, then you will need to purchase a new set. Otherwise, relax and use them anyway.
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