How to I start growing herbs in a window box?

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I just moved into a new place with great window boxes, but right now they're just full of old weeds. I want to start growing a few herbs. What are some good tips and tricks for someone who doesn't have a green thumb?
q how to i start growing herbs in a window box , container gardening, gardening, plant care
  7 answers
  • Riabailey Riabailey on Jun 26, 2016
    Hi good for you, if you have some sun during the day but not too hot, grow parsley, basil, coriander (needs cool), chillis, mint, anything is worth a go except things that need a lot of room like rosemary. try also some nasturtians as they are pretty and produce edible flowers and capers. also cut off the bottom of your bunch of spring onions and pop them in as they will grow very quickly as will lettuce. good luck and happy gardening

  • Riabailey Riabailey on Jun 26, 2016
    forgot to mention put some good potting soil in and some cow manure, helps heaps

  • Deh7220306 Deh7220306 on Jun 26, 2016
    Remove the old soil, scrub the window box with soap and water, dry. Use a good potting soil, Pro-mix for herbs and veg. is a good one. Herbs that do well for the micro-climate of your window box area would be best. If you get a lot of cool weather basil will not thrive. Oregano grows large over the years, but great if you intend to replace/split it. rosemary, lavender, cilantro, tarragon, parsley. thyme. Cilantro and tarragon will not come back the following year. Dill and regular chives grow too big, but I have found garlic chives stay small and fine textured.

  • Deh7220306 Deh7220306 on Jun 26, 2016
    basil will not thrive in cold conditions. Oregano grows large over the years, but great if you intend to replace/split it. rosemary, lavender, cilantro, tarragon, parsley. thyme. Cilantro and tarragon will not come back the following year.

  • ObiaMan ObiaMan on Jun 26, 2016
    Excellent advice so far. Totally cleaning the boxes can go a long way. Same for the soil mix. I'm a soil mix freak. I like to buy all sorts of stuff and mix it all together - potting soil, vermiculite, perlite, cow manure, blood & bone meal, peat moss, compost, sand, just to name a few. Basil is always good and can grow kind of tall. Oregano does spread but might look good cascading over. Mints can get way out of hand. I live way down south, so I have parsley that's been growing since spring of last year. Try sets of onions if you like fresh green onions. You can keep trimming them over and over. Sage is really nice looking. Add a few French marigolds for beauty and insect control. Just have fun and try different things over the years.

    • Cara Cara on Jun 26, 2016
      Thanks James for the great advice. I didn't know marigolds can be use for insect control.

  • ObiaMan ObiaMan on Jun 26, 2016
    Almost across the board, if you search plants for pest control, you'll always find marigolds. I've grown them everywhere I can for years and they're just beautiful, from the small French multi colored ones to the huge solid yellows and oranges. They start from seed very easily, transplant easily and spread nicely. They are used extensively around tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, basil, almost with any plant. Keep the flowers dead headed and they keep flowering for months. Here in deep south Louisiana I've had some last for several years. The small ones will stay about 6" tall while the taller ones can easily reach 3' tall.

  • Deh7220306 Deh7220306 on Jun 26, 2016
    Queen Sophia are the most beautiful marigolds; they form great mounds of fair sized blooms. Just gorgeous and they are quite easy to start from seed and plant outside once there is no chance of frost.