Asked on Feb 03, 2014

How do I repair broke marble?

Jessica C
by Jessica C
+19
Answered
Help! I inherited this beautiful antique dresser with a marble top. Unfortunately the corner of the marble is broken. Is there some sort of glue or epoxy that will work to glue the pieces back together? I have never worked with marble before and I don't want to mess this up!
q how do i repair broke marble, diy, home maintenance repairs, how to, painted furniture, tiling, I inherited this dresser with the marble top that was damaged years ago
I inherited this dresser with the marble top that was damaged years ago.
q how do i repair broke marble, diy, home maintenance repairs, how to, painted furniture, tiling, It is on the back corner of the piece and looks like it wouldn t be hard to repair
It is on the back corner of the piece and looks like it wouldn't be hard to repair.
q how do i repair broke marble, diy, home maintenance repairs, how to, painted furniture, tiling, The pieces seem to fit together perfectly I am not sure what sort of product to use to put them together
The pieces seem to fit together perfectly, I am not sure what sort of product to use to put them together.
  19 answers
  • Nancy M Nancy M on Feb 03, 2014
    I would think a two part epoxy would work but if not I would drape some sort of table runner or ever a scarf or crocheted piece over it. No one will know.

  • Nivasi Frankly-Speaks Nivasi Frankly-Speaks on Feb 03, 2014
    of course there is an epoxy, how do you think they put huge pieces of it together in the kitchen? there are canvas clamps you can use to hold in place while drying.

    • LinJ47 LinJ47 on Feb 04, 2014
      @@Nivasi Frankly-Speaks You are absolutely correct. My Dad was a marble carver, cutter, etc who worked in dozens of NYC cathedrals, prominent buildings (St Patrick's, St John the Divine, the UN & WTC) and they used special epoxies to hold the marble pieces together. I would strongly suggest though that since this is such a splendid piece with lots of family history to it to take the extra pains to have some professional help to restore that broken marble top. It also appears that there is a piece missing and a pro could have that piece back to its original glory. An amateur attempt to fix this might very well ruin this marble top and unfortunately the results would be very disappointing. I wouldn't take the chance if I were the owner.

  • Jennifer G Jennifer G on Feb 03, 2014
    Visit a Marble store for advice or I found this online: http://www.acrylicrepair.com/marble.html Good Luck!

  • Devcon makes a two part epoxy that will hold that together. Check with your local stone supplier, they may have something other to suggest, but the epoxy should do the trick nicely.

  • Jessica C Jessica C on Feb 04, 2014
    Thanks everyone!

  • Christine Christine on Feb 05, 2014
    Be careful supporting it if you epoxy it together. You only get one chance and if it shifts or droops, it's doomed to look 1/2 done forever. Lovely piece!

  • The "glue" that stone countertops are joined with is not epoxy, but I believe a polyester-based stone adhesive (smells like Bondo for that reason). I agree, to preserve the value and look of this piece, I'd hesitate to recommend repairing it yourself. The professionals mix colorant additives into their adhesives so that the glue line blends in with the surrounding stone. You're not going to get that with an off-the-shelf product. Also, a professional stone worker would have the equipment to buff out the glue line to hide it further, or even patch in additional material where it's missing. You might start by asking around at stone/granite countertop companies in your area if it's something they would take on. Most of them are probably in the business of selling stone+fabrication+installation as a package, so it might take some searching. If there's a stone slab wholesaler or showroom in your area, they could likely refer you to folks who do just the fabrication & installation, which is more the type of company you should be looking for.

    • Jessica C Jessica C on Feb 05, 2014
      @Eason Construction Services, Inc. Thanks so much for the information, I had no idea they could do all that! Will definitely seek professional help. Thank you!

  • Welch Creative Lighting Welch Creative Lighting on Feb 05, 2014
    I would think any of your local granite/marble fabricators would do this for you happily.

  • Timeless Interiors Timeless Interiors on Feb 05, 2014
    If you don't want to bring it in somewhere, E6000 glue is great for almost everything. It's the best permanent adhesive on the market, and it's cheap! You can get it on Amazon.

  • MarineMom MarineMom on Feb 05, 2014
    Wow ! Your dresser is identical to one I inherited. The bottom of dresser is a hidden drawer. I would like to know how to clean mable that has a few stains and discoloring. I would not recommened using e6000. I use it for crafts and around the house, however for true strength is does not hold up. You can get E6000 at Walmart in craft section.

    • Debby Debby on Feb 07, 2014
      @MarineMom i would try barkeepers friend or damp baking soda slurry to clean your marble, or call local stone company or installer for reccomendations. I've always had good luck w soda or barkeepers but would depend on what the stain is as well. Good luck.

  • Anna Ibarra Anna Ibarra on Feb 05, 2014
    I always wonder about fixing something like this, so glad you asked.

  • Our best recommendation is the same as 'Welch Creative Lighting" (above). Most tile and granite sales outfits have a list of the local fabricators.

  • Larry W Larry W on Feb 07, 2014
    There are adhesives and clamps that can be purchased...but the glues come in a wide array of colors to match the specific stone, of which your local hardware store will not carry. There will be clamps needed to hold it in place, and then it will have to be sanded and repolished to hide the "fix". You are better off hiring a professional to do it. Calcitic marbles are soft and hard to deal with, the chances of you fixing it to the look you want are minute.

  • Steve Smith Steve Smith on Oct 05, 2015
    A good epoxy for marble is Super Mend by Goop. It is used by monument companies to repair cemetery marble markers. It mixes easily and cures quickly. Clamping is recommended. Color is bright white. Sold on Amazon.

  • Ademola-Oba Gbadebo Ademola-Oba Gbadebo on Aug 08, 2016
    Buy Locitte at Walmart or Home depot.

  • Sal10822870 Sal10822870 on Sep 07, 2016
    i would take to a marble company and have it professionally done. i have one that was done 50 years ago and so unnoticeable. it is a stunning piece. the cost will be worth it. good luck. sallie newman

  • Allison Elizabeth Fox Allison Elizabeth Fox on Jan 23, 2017
    I have that same piece as well- also broken! Do you have the matching piece that goes with it?

  • Jessica C Jessica C on Jan 23, 2017
    I have the marble piece that I still haven't glue in place. I do not have any other pieces to the furniture set.

  • Ademola-Oba Gbadebo Ademola-Oba Gbadebo on Jan 24, 2017
    use Locceite or liquid cement