Southern Trillium LLC
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Asked on May 11, 2012

Does anyone know what this is?

Florauae.1VeraSherryle Hinton
+46

Answered

I know these photos are not great, but all I had on me was my cell phone. This was growing at a client's yard and we noticed it blooming in a very shady corner near their house. I am struggling to identify it. I took these photos on May 3, 2012.
It reminds me of Winter Jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum) based on the leaves and similar shape of the flowers, but the flowers are appearing on the ends, not along the stems like Winter Jasmine. It is also not the season for winter jasmine. Thanks for the help.
q does anyone know what this is, flowers, gardening
q does anyone know what this is, flowers, gardening
46 answers
  • KMS Woodworks
    on May 11, 2012

    years ago I had an indoor jasmine ( because our climate is cold) it had white flowers just like those

  • Rebecca D
    on May 11, 2012

    Lisa C. spring perennials are divided in the fall. And fall perennials should be moved in the spring.

  • Louise R
    on May 11, 2012

    Does it have a fragrance? Night blooming Jasmine has yellow flowers and a different smell from the others.

  • Karen C
    on May 11, 2012

    Looks like my star jasmine. It can be white or yellow and has a great aroma. Will spread and comes back every year.

  • Jenny M
    on May 11, 2012

    The foliage is reminiscent of Vinca Minor, a shade-loving evergreen ground cover, but the blooms should be lavender in color. So....I don't know.

  • Mona D
    on May 11, 2012

    It is a jasmine. not sure which one but still very pretty.

  • Ann H
    on May 11, 2012

    Could it be Carolina Jessamine?

  • Jenny M
    on May 11, 2012

    Could be Carolina Jessamine... a very large growing vine.

  • Linda B
    on May 11, 2012

    honeysuckle?

  • Ruth R
    on May 11, 2012

    looks like a carolina jasmine

  • Jenny M
    on May 11, 2012

    Now I definitely think it's a Carolina Jessamine.

  • Jenny M
    on May 11, 2012

    Carolina Jessamine love full sun and grow very large. They can cover a telephone pole in just a few years if left unpruned.

  • Patricia S
    on May 11, 2012

    The yellow flowers & leaves look like my butterfly vine. It's seeds look like butterflies.

  • KC S
    on May 11, 2012

    euonymous?

  • Southern Trillium LLC
    on May 11, 2012

    It is not Carolina jessamine, the leaves are completely different. I looked at Star Jasmine as well, but the leaves are still completely different. Also, this is not on the ground, but was growing all over a fence. At least I am not the only one that is struggling to identify it.

  • Les H
    on May 11, 2012

    It has trifoliate leaves...so it is not Carolina Jasmine...looks more like Jasminum fruticans ( Yellow Jasmine)

  • Cathy L
    on May 11, 2012

    This looks exactly like "Periwinkle" to me. Most often it's flower is lavender & I have had a white one - but have never seen a yellow one. It loves the shade and flowers in the spring.

  • Melanie M
    on May 11, 2012

    it is a yellow jasmine i have them in my yard and i also have the white jasmine they grow awesome in south Texas

  • Cynthia E
    on May 11, 2012

    either Fla. native yellow jasmine or Italian yellow jasmine

  • Debi M
    on May 11, 2012

    Love the smell of jasmine. I have an entire fence covered w/Carolina Jasmine. Does yours have a perfumey odor?

  • Sue S
    on May 11, 2012

    the suspense is killing me! I'm with those who liken it to vinca but also have never seen yellow.

  • Southern Trillium LLC
    on May 12, 2012

    This is not VInca. I agree with those that posted above, beginning with Les, that it is Yellow Jasmine. I have never seen it before, but it is an attractive plant.

  • Southern Trillium LLC
    on May 12, 2012

    Upon further discussion with my uncle that was with me when we first saw the shrub, he did some further checking in one of his books, and we believe it is actually Jasminum floridum, Les got it close enough to find the exact match. Thanks Les.

  • Terri G
    on May 12, 2012

    pretty sure I used to propagate this at work, & that is the right name for the plant

  • Debi M
    on May 13, 2012

    This is a photo of Carolina Jasmine. This particular jasmine is 5 years old. The flowers are a bit different from yours, these are a pale yellow, not the vibrant yellow that yours are. I'm sure you have a jasmine, but it isn't Carolina Jasmine

    q does anyone know what this is, flowers, gardening, Carolina Jasmine
  • Debi M
    on May 13, 2012

    PS: I agree, jasmine grows really fast. I planted 3 Carolina Jasmine plants on my fence 5 years ago and it is now completely covered, making a wonderful sweet smelling barrier

  • Joline Cosman
    on Feb 10, 2013

    Looks like .... Begonia pavonina.....

  • Cindy Wood
    on Feb 11, 2013

    This looks like the Carolina Jasmine I have planted beside my swing-arbor --It is a vine and has completely climbed over the top and has the most amazing aroma like no other flower -- beautiful bright yellow blooms. (*_*)

  • Suzy
    on Feb 11, 2013

    yellow jasmine

  • 8498tx
    on Feb 12, 2013

    it is yellow jasmine, grows like the Carolina but the flowers are a brighter prettier yellow. Everyone wants that one but very hard to find in a store and buy, nurserys usually only grow and sell the Carolina one. You have found a treasure!

  • Sherryle Hinton
    on Feb 13, 2013

    It looks like Confederate Jasmine to me, I have it over an arch and mine blooms in May and again late summer. It is a creamy color and has a very sweet smell and when the blooms fade, they have a very sickening odor (to Me). It grows very thick and easy to root in water! And will cover anything very quickly!!

  • KC S
    on Feb 18, 2013

    I would agree with the Jasmine...mine's a white Confederate Jasmine and just has the best smell...I love it when there's a breeze when I'm outside, perfumes the air!

  • Kathy Garber
    on Jun 14, 2013

    I have no idea what it is, but, I would love to have a start..lol..........beautiful!!!!

  • Sandy
    on Feb 18, 2015

    I see 3 leaves--------flee!

    • Marti
      on Apr 28, 2015

      @Sandy, I apologize. I just assumed you were talking about Poison Ivy. Just the thought of Poison Ivy makes my antenna start shaking!! I got into some Poison Ivy about 6 yrs ago. About 4 hours later, my life had changed!! Albeit a temporary change for about 6 weeks but one that seemed like 6 years!!! I was working in my yard and thought I was pulling up the Virginia Creeper vine but turned out to be Poison Ivy!! OUCH!! After that I tried to make myself knowledgeable about the poison vines because every vine I saw a vine of any kind, I wanted to run the opposite direction. Below is something I have placed in one of my computer files and refresh my memory before hiking or being in a heavy foliage area. Poison ivy is generally found east of the Rocky Mountains, growing as vines or shrubs. The leaves can have either smooth or notched edges and are often clustered in groups of three. Poison oak is more commonly found west of the Rockies, usually as a small bush but sometimes as a climbing vine. Its leaves are smooth-edged and cluster in groups of three, five, or seven. Poison sumac is most often found in wet areas of the Southeast. The leaves are generally smooth and oval-shaped, with seven to 13 growing on each stem. I hope we can both continue enjoy the beautiful outdoors without any encounters with poisonous plants or bugs or reptile!!

  • Marti
    on Apr 28, 2015

    Hey Sandy... I am sorry.... I apologize....I thought you were referring to Poison Ivy. That is one poison vine I keep in front of my mind when discussing poison vines because there was so much of it on the property we used to live before buying our new house. And...it was there I had my MISERABLE encounter with that stinker!! Below is information I put in a computer file on Poisonous Vines. When I had my encounter with Poison Ivy, I actually thought I was pulling up the Virginia Creeper vine. That is a vine whose leaves are in a cluster of five but looks just like Poison Ivy leaves (clusters of three) but is nonetheless most often confused with Poison Ivy. Oh well, I live and learn! Poison ivy is generally found east of the Rocky Mountains, growing as vines or shrubs. The leaves can have either smooth or notched edges and are often clustered in groups of three. Poison oak is more commonly found west of the Rockies, usually as a small bush but sometimes as a climbing vine. Its leaves are smooth-edged and cluster in groups of three, five, or seven. Poison sumac is most often found in wet areas of the Southeast. The leaves are generally smooth and oval-shaped, with seven to 13 growing on each stem. Again...I am sorry I assumed you were talking about Poison Ivy. May we both be careful while enjoying the beautiful outdoors!!

  • Sandy
    on Apr 28, 2015

    I know, Marti! I had my first "attack" of poison ivy at the age of 40, and, now, many years after, I cannot get near it without an outbreak!

  • Nin
    on Jul 20, 2015

    Looks like a summer jasmine i sawfor sale last week.

  • Lisamstratton
    on Jul 20, 2015

    I believe the first photo is a wild morning glory. They are considered a nuisance. They are difficult to kill because they have a long root system. They will take over everything in your yard. We have them in Wyoming and they are awful! However, since the flowers are yellow, I am not sure. Morning glories are white with a hint of pink just before blooming.

  • Leslie
    on Jul 20, 2015

    It looks to me like "carolina" jasmine.

  • Larry Lou
    on Jul 21, 2015

    The leaves look like a Jasmine, which one I'm not sure, but they don't look like wild morning glory as we have 3 different colors of them and none of the leaves or flowers look like the ones here in AZ. Not sure about your area, but leaves look like Jasmine for sure. Hope you find out :)

  • Mary
    on Sep 27, 2015

    It is carolina Jasmine. I have 2 in my yard. They can take over if you don't keep them pruned back in the winter.

  • Mary
    on May 6, 2016

    If it opens up white then turns yellow it's probably star jasmine.

  • Sherryle Hinton
    on May 9, 2016

    Carolina Jasmine

  • Vera
    on May 11, 2016

    This is Honeysuckle

  • Florauae.1
    on Jun 1, 2016

    This is a yellow flower. http://florauae.com

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