What is this large flying insect?

+24
Answered
On the first picture it is on the upper right hand side. And on the second it is lower left corner. I thought it was a hummingbird when I took the pictures. Can you help?
q what is this large flying insect, pets animals
q what is this large flying insect, pets animals
  21 answers
  • Dawn McCreary Dawn McCreary on Oct 11, 2013
    you aren't too far off in thinking its a hummingbird. it's a clear wing hummingbird moth. they are daytime moths. I get them all summer long in my garden in eastern PA.

  • Jeanette S Jeanette S on Oct 11, 2013
    My question is, "What is the name of that stunning flowering bush?" I am thinking Althea (Rose of Sharon)? I gotta get one!

  • Jessica C Jessica C on Oct 11, 2013
    We had one of those striped hummingbird moths in our garden for the first time this year. They are very beneficial and pollinate just like a hummingbird does. You are blessed to have one!

  • MaryKay@Studio23Thirty MaryKay@Studio23Thirty on Oct 11, 2013
    Thank you so much. A hummingbird moth-wow!

  • MaryKay@Studio23Thirty MaryKay@Studio23Thirty on Oct 11, 2013
    Thanks so much. I saw my 1st live hummingbird last Spring and have been fascinated ever since. Now a hummingbird moth. I'm blessed.

  • Jeanette S Jeanette S on Oct 11, 2013
    I don't know if you are familiar with these plants, but they are considerd a "near nieusance" plant.. You may want to rim them in the fall to keep them from getting leggy. And to get rid of the pods that drop to the ground and seed.

    • April E April E on Oct 13, 2013
      @Jeanette S the rose of Sharon is only considered a nuisance in certain areas in the area she is in they are great plants with few reasons to be called a nuisance. please remember what is 1 persons weed is anothers exotic flower and also some folks plant the rose of Sharon BECAUSE they will spread and make a nice hedge

  • Jeanette S Jeanette S on Oct 11, 2013
    I don't know if you are familiar with these plants, but they are considerd a "near nieusance" plant.. You may want to trim them in the fall to keep them from getting leggy. And to get rid of the pods that drop to the ground and seed.

  • Mary Kay Mary Kay on Oct 11, 2013
    Thanks for the advise. I wish I had some warning on the morning glories I planted a few years ago. Talk about an invasion. Oh my.

  • John Reilly John Reilly on Oct 12, 2013
    They are called SPHINX moths and they come from the tomato horn worm. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphingidae

    • See 2 previous
    • April E April E on Oct 17, 2013
      @John Reilly @John Reilly Hemaris thysbe is the moth that is pictured what you are calling the sphinx moth that come from the tomato horn worm is Manduca quinquemaculata a completely different moth from what she showed macroglossium and manduca do beling to the genus Sphingidae however they are different species and have different pupae (or caterpillar forms) so this is how you are wrong put in laymans terms this would be trying to say you 3rd cousin twice removed was the same as your sister. oh and btw there are over 100 members of the Sphingidae genius

  • Chris J Chris J on Oct 12, 2013
    I had a tomato horn worm in my garden 2 years ago. He leveled all my peppers and 3 tomatoes. He went in the garbage. Yuck!!

  • Vicki Vicki on Oct 12, 2013
    u are very lucky to have sphinx moth. do not have any sphinx moths here lately. I will love to save those tomato horn caterpillars that u do not want. ;-) I do have several rose of Sharon. I admire the beauty of flowers and hummingbirds love those, too.

  • Sharon Sharon on Oct 13, 2013
    I found a moth hummingbird in my garden in upstate NY several years ago. The home section of the Herald Journal had an article about them w/ pictures just before I saw it, so I knew what it was when I saw it + I was thrilled, since the article explained that it was rare to see them in our climate. I had my camera in my pocket (I'm obsessed w/ gardening as well as photography) + actually got a great picture of it, too.

  • Jeanette S Jeanette S on Oct 13, 2013
    Oh, don't get me wrong....they are one of my favorite plants. Beautiful colors, easy to grow, and bloom when nothing else does in hot, dry weather! But down herek, they spread with every flower that drops off and reseeds! So we have to watch them.

  • Jinny Jinny on Oct 15, 2013
    It is a Hummingbird Moth.

  • Debbie B Cook Debbie B Cook on Oct 15, 2013
    Hummingbird Moth. Pretty but in the caterpillar stage of growth these beauties are Tomato Horned worms!! They will devastate your Tomato crops. Have them every year! On going battle here. Last year I hand picked 23 off of my Tomatoes in one day! lol ;)

    • Chris J Chris J on Oct 16, 2013
      @Debbie B Cook A friend of mine had them too. She said if it is a quiet night, you can hear them chewing on your plants and you can locate them that way. I consider myself lucky we had only the one and none since.

  • MaryKay@Studio23Thirty MaryKay@Studio23Thirty on Oct 15, 2013
    Thanks for the good advise everyone.

  • DutchJetje DutchJetje on Oct 16, 2013
    I see someone has answered your question already; it's a hummingbird butterfly! Though night creatures, often spotted by day.

  • Gloria Ketter Gloria Ketter on Oct 18, 2013
    Hummingbird moths!

  • Alva Jean Sharp Alva Jean Sharp on Oct 19, 2013
    I have had ROSE OF SHARONS for many years. Had not problem with them multiplying. I might find one ocassionally but never more than one a year. So enjoy your spiritual plants.

  • Patricia HATLEY Patricia HATLEY on Aug 09, 2015
    I've had a similar insect. Hovers like a hummingbird but looks like a moth. It loves these purple flowers I have.