Asked on Jan 12, 2018

Can you cut back hydrangeas after a freeze

Linda SikutWanda sinnemaGlenda smiley
+4

Answered

6 answers
  • Janet Pizaro
    Janet Pizaro
    on Jan 12, 2018

    NO........Leave them alone until the spring when the new growth begins to be able to determine what should be pruned
  • Pg
    Pg
    on Jan 12, 2018

    In late winter or early spring, these shrubs can be cut all the way back to the ground. Smooth hydrangeas will produce much larger blooms if pruned hard like this each year, but many gardeners opt for smaller blooms on sturdier stems.
    www.finegardening.com/pruning-hydrangeas
  • Vimarhonor
    Vimarhonor
    on Jan 12, 2018

    The timing of the pruning seem determines by the hydrangea variety that you have according to this source.

    Prune during the summer, just after the flowers fade:
    Bigleaf or Florist Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla)
    Prune in late winter or early spring:
    Hills-of-Snow or Sevenbark Hydrangea (H. arborescens ‘Grandiflora’),
    Oakleaf Hydrangea (H. quercifolia)
    Peegee Hydrangea (H. paniculata ‘Grandiflora’),
    Tea of Heaven (H. serrata)
    Prune as needed to control growth -
    Climbing Hydrangea (H. anomala petiolaris)


  • Glenda smiley
    Glenda smiley
    on Jan 12, 2018

    why? They will come out in spring. Some cut back every year but dimishes size of bush. In spring you can have new growth and old. Old being what considering cutting. You can cut or not in my opinion
  • Wanda sinnema
    Wanda sinnema
    on Jan 12, 2018

    I'd wait. remember if you cut off the brown tips of leaves forming, you may be cutting off next years blooms.. Regardless of the weather, if I didn't do it in the fall I always wait till spring in case it freezes hard again.
  • Linda Sikut
    Linda Sikut
    on Jan 12, 2018

    Hi Phyllis,
    It depends on the type of hydrangea you have. Some hydrangeas bloom on old wood and if you cut them back now, you will be cutting off flower buds. Some hydrangeas bloom on new wood and so those would probably be okay to cut back, but I really don't think it's necessary. I live in a section of the US where it gets cold and freezing temperatures are normal in the winter. My hydrangeas will bloom in the summer anyway. Mine is called Endless Summer and is the only one (that I'm aware of) that will bloom on old and new wood. What you really need to know is the name of your hydrangea and your hardiness zone. Below is an article about hydrangeas and late frost that might help you even more. Wishing you the best.
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