Asked on Jan 7, 2019

How do I redo my linoleum countertop and splash board?

Ken Erickson

Answered

Linoleum counter and back splash need help

2 answers
  • Ken Erickson
    on Jan 7, 2019

    Some people have used a countertop paint kit and had good results. You could also remove old countertop and make a new one.

    • Ann Carolan
      on Jan 7, 2019

      I was looking for a recent home talk project that showed this but I can’t find it?

  • Ken Erickson
    on Jan 7, 2019

    I build Laminate top countertops for Habitat for Humanity houses. Buy 25" wide countertop particle board (3/4") at the lumber store (it is labeled that way). Lay out the top to match your kitchen configuration. "L" shaped counters will need to be glued together. Don't bother making a 45 degree angle cut - just go square. I usually use a groove cutting bit in a router to make a groove at the seam and glue a plywood spline at the seam and pull seam together with clamps until glue dries. Dowels, biscuits, or dominos also work. Flip countertop over and attach more 3/4" thick strips of the countertop material of 1x3 or 1x4 solid wood along the outside edges of the countertop to make it 1.5" thick. I usually keep the back edges recessed in by 1/8" to ensure the top fits snugly against the wall without being affected by lower strip. Add more wood strips from back to front located at the location of the cabinet walls. All of this build-up wood is glued and either screwed or nail gun installed in place. Ensure you don't penetrate the top. Use 1-1/4" nails or screws. Nailing is fastest and the glue will be doing the most structural work. If you have a seam, cover the entire seam with a wide piece of build-up material. I try for about 10"-12" but depends on what scraps I have. We install blocks in the corners of many cabinets near the top. We screw up through these blocks and into the countertop to hold it in place. We add oak strips (glued and nailed) to the outside edges to the countertop. You can use any desired wood, but it needs to cover the underlayment edges (at least 1.5"). Then the laminate top is installed (oversize) with contact cement. Place sticks on top of counter so laminate doesn't touch until you want it to. It WON'T move after sticking. Pull out a center stick and press laminate in place and work your way to the ends. A J-roller or rolling pin helps ensure good contact. Trim the edges with a bearing guided flush trim bit. Then go through with a chamfer bearing guided bit to make a bevel along all front edges. Leave wall sides flush. Lay countertop in place and screw through corner block with 1.5" wood screws. Then install your backsplash.

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