Asked on Feb 23, 2019

How do I know if this oven plug meets irc building code?

BetsyLana HassellSeth
+16

Answered

I can’t believe this is safe with the box open like that? What if a pot boiled over? Please help.

15 answers
  • I would contact a professional. I'm sure if you email a local company they can give you advice.

  • Fiddledd224
    Fiddledd224
    on Feb 23, 2019

    Call your township building code inspector. If it doesn't meet code they will tell you (and contact the contractor)

  • V Smith
    V Smith
    on Feb 24, 2019

    Go on-line with the manufacturer of your appliance and see what their installation manual says about connecting the power. You may get an idea of what needs to be done from there.

  • Jb225264797
    Jb225264797
    on Feb 24, 2019

    The clamp is just a strain relief to keep the cable in place. It isn't intended to seal the box. Your range will cover the plug. There isn't any way for a boil-over to affect it.

  • David
    David
    on Feb 24, 2019

    By building code the plug-in should be so far off flooring shouldn't be on the floor in the first place . someone probably didn't have enough wire to put it on the wall or didn't know how to get it inside the wall but either way it should be on the wall and up off the floor.

  • George
    George
    on Feb 24, 2019

    1) The picture shows a hard-wired connection, not a "plug".

    2) Consult a licensed electrician. Do Not try to interpret the National Electrical Code on your own; you do not have the background knowledge.

    3) The picture tells me this was a DIY installation - NOT done by a professional. Get it fixed. If there is a fire and your insurance company can lay the blame on this connection, they will not pay full restitution.

  • Lucy Marie Bernier
    Lucy Marie Bernier
    on Feb 24, 2019

    Please check into all of the above comments! That does not look safe.

  • Mona Blake
    Mona Blake
    on Feb 24, 2019

    Call an electrician immedeiately! It is worth the money to have it certified safe! Our gas and light company would send out somepne for free.

  • Carol
    Carol
    on Feb 25, 2019

    My home Was built new. Having issues getting reliable advice and why I’m reaching out. Haven’t closed yet because of so many builder issues. The builder picked all the subcontractors and now I know why.

    actually the electrician was the only one I trusted and now after finding this I’m at a loss. Please help. Why don’t builders do everything to code? My contract states everything would be done according to code. The local code officials shrugged me off. Sad people get paid to protect the public and don’t do their jobs.

  • Betsy
    Betsy
    on Feb 25, 2019

    Hi Carol: I would NOT close on this home until you had an independent contractor check everything out. First, contact the city to have them come out and check these things. Get the name of the contractor who comes out and have him sign off on any repairs. If you have stickers on your windows saying who inspected what, take good pictures of those. When you take the stickers off, they will tear. You need to know who is responsible for signing off, in case anything goes wrong. The city, as a rule, has to inspect and pass everything, and they do it at no cost to you. What that tube is, and why it's just hanging out there is very suspicious. Until you and the city are happy with the work, don't sign anything. Even if they say they will come back later and fix it, don't believe it. They should do it now, otherwise they will never do it. It's just how they operate! Good luck, and remember, don't sign anything until you are satisfied.

    • Betsy
      Betsy
      on Feb 27, 2019

      No, I didn't miss that, that's why I suggested she get names and signatures. If something goes wrong, she will know exactly who to go to. If they don't sign, then she shouldn't sign. If she does sign and something goes awry, then she will have paperwork to take to court. She can sue for repairs AND her attorney fees if she wins:)

  • William
    William
    on Feb 25, 2019

    I agree that this is dangerous. Should not be that way. I definitely agree with Betsy. Sounds like the local inspector may have been paid off or missed the plug. Most builders do use their own sub contractors they are happy with. You should have been given a punch list to jot down what needs to be redone or repaired before closing on the property. Don't close until everything is repaired properly. You can also deal with your lender and homeowners insurance carrier if no one else will correct the problems. Good luck.

  • Seth
    Seth
    on Feb 26, 2019

    Carol,

    Another thing to check is if your wiring for the stove is correct in your electrical panel. If your stove is rated for 50 amps, then your panel should show a dedicated circuit for just the stove with a tandem breaker (looks like 2 breakers connected with a bar) wired for 240 volts on a 50 amp circuit. Your stove might be rated for more or less so the circuit should match it. The IRC does not speak to specific wiring of appliances like stoves. The NEC defers to the appliance manufacturers installation requirements and speaks only to outlet placement if your stove has a corded plug and is not hardwired. The generally accepted practice in new construction is that all wiring and receptacles are mounted in such a way as to be contained within the cavity at the rear and bottom of the stove so the stove can go up against a wall without obstruction. The box and wiring in the picture may not be out of code other than it should be inside/under the stove.



  • Lana Hassell
    Lana Hassell
    on Feb 26, 2019

    Carol,

    Everyone has excellent ideas that you need to seriously consider. I am sensing just through reading your letter that you live in a small town where everyone knows everyone else and everybody's business. I have lived in a town with 3500 people and lived in one with several million people. I have a reason for telling you this, and it is simply so you will know that I do understand what you are going through. Now, IF AT ALL POSSIBLE, RUN, DON'T WALK to the closest large town where you can find a House Inspector. One who has no connections to your town or the people in it. I really think that your town has a few "good ol' boys" that "help" each other out on such things as cheap substitutions for building materials, and the City code people ignoring you as they did. You need to bring in the Big Dogs. After you get a REAL House Inspector, you may find that you have grounds for, and need of, an Attorney (from out of town). I wish you good luck and hope everything turns out okay. 🌹💖😘

  • Betsy
    Betsy
    on Feb 27, 2019

    Hi Carol: Lana has some good ideas, too. If you take her advice, I'd still get something in writing and signed from anyone you have that inspects anything. You will need every document you can get your hands on to substantiate adn prove your case should you have to go to court.

  • Betsy
    Betsy
    on Mar 1, 2019

    Good luck to you Carol. Let us know how things turn out for you.

Your comment...