Does anyone know what kind of tree this is?

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I have been trying for a long time to get an ID on this tree. It is about 16 years old and was given to me by a friend in Rocky Mount, NC but they didn't know what kind it was either. It blooms in the fall with a bunch of tiny white bell-shaped flowers. It stays green all year through the winter. It is do for some more shaping from I see from my pics lol! Please help me ID this tree if you can. Thank you in advance!
does anyone know what kind of tree this is, flowers, gardening
does anyone know what kind of tree this is, flowers, gardening
does anyone know what kind of tree this is, flowers, gardening
does anyone know what kind of tree this is, flowers, gardening
does anyone know what kind of tree this is, flowers, gardening, This is the base of the tree
This is the base of the tree.
  9 answers
  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson) 360 Sod (Donna Dixson) on Nov 10, 2013
    Eleagnus, fondly also known in the trade as ugly agnus. I think this is the Eleagnus x ebbingei.

  • Joan Malisa Joan Malisa on Nov 10, 2013
    Elaeagnus x ebbingei (Elaeagnus)sun sun/shadeheight 10.0 ftwidth 10.0 ftwater averagegrowth rate averagehardiness zones (6) 7-9soil well drained soilsflower silvery white flowersseed brown to red drupefoliage Evergreenfall color greenSpecies Description:A hybrid with E. pungens. Fragrant bell-shaped flowers in winter.Cultivar Description:Vigorous grower with less erratic growth habit. Dark green foliage with prominent silver scales.

  • Terri Jones Terri Jones on Nov 10, 2013
    Thank you!

  • Marie Stallone Marie Stallone on Nov 10, 2013
    This looks like Mountain Laurel

    • Terri Jones Terri Jones on Nov 11, 2013
      @Marie Stallone Thank you but I am pretty sure it is Eleagnus form what I see on the internet. It matches it perfectly.

  • Wendy Shonebarger Wendy Shonebarger on Nov 10, 2013
    eleagnus is right

  • Elaeagnus. Such a lovely fragrance. The shrub itself though is not suitable near the house because it grows so fast and looks "messy" by most urban and suburban standards. Traditionally this was used to mark property lines or divide pastures because the "whips" become intertwined making the hedge impenetrable.

  • Angie W Angie W on Apr 05, 2014
    Elaeagnus umbellata (Autumn Olive)

  • Terri Jones Terri Jones on Apr 05, 2014
    Thank you so much, Angie! That is it for sure!

  • Diana Kosa Diana Kosa on Nov 27, 2015
    I learned hat the Autumn Olive has edible berries in Fall. Just sample in moderation for the nature guide who taught me made a tea from them to share w/ her hubby. after sipping the tea they both woke up 2 hours later, so use caution :)