How can I get my Christmas cactus to grow?

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I have a Christmas cactus for 3 years this Christmas it's a house plant. I planted in MIRACLE GROW it doesn't grow any flowers and doesn't grow any larger but it is green and health, I have it in indirect lighting. How can I get it to flower and grow ?

  6 answers
  • Diane Coverdale Diane Coverdale on Sep 07, 2018

    Christmas cactus can be encouraged to flower two ways, by a light trigger or by temperature. A change in the light cycle will cause it to bloom , or if it can get a chill of cold air (don't freeze it) will also work.

  • Susan Susan on Sep 07, 2018

    My Christmas Cactus was just there till I put it outside this summer. I have new growth everywhere!! I will leave it outside until the temps really get really cold. Then I'll bring them in and place in a dark spot, and pray they will bloom. But, I have sooooo much new growth with the heat and humidity with them being outside..just have grown soooo much!

    • Mlr18589325 Mlr18589325 on Sep 08, 2018

      I put my Thanksgiving Cactus, Christmas Cactus starters off a 100 year old mother plant, and my Easter Cactus all outside, and man they have grown rapidly. I have also found that terra cotta pots, although they are not pretty, they work much better for growing these tropical cactus than plastic or ceramic pots

  • Lynda Delpino Lynda Delpino on Sep 08, 2018

    Thanks everyone for your suggestions, they do grow in the dessert right. I will put it outside.

    • Mlr18589325 Mlr18589325 on Sep 08, 2018

      Christmas, Easter, and Thanksgiving Cactus are not desert cacti, they are tropical cacti. When you place outside, put them in a well shaded area, as they are not “sun lovers”.

  • Pamela R Pamela R on Sep 08, 2018

    I am in Florida and my Christmas Cactus only come in when we have a threat of freezing (or hurricanes  )

  • Susan Susan on Sep 08, 2018

    Christmas cactus need declining light and cool temps to set blooms. Keep outside as long as you can without freezing -- natural light cycles and cooler night temperatures in the Fall generally prompt blooming.