My poor mint plant has brown withered areas - help!

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Hi hometalkers, I have a nice healthy mint plant, sitting in a spot that gets direct sunlight a couple hours a day (and the rest of the day lots of indirect sunlight - its outside on a porch). Over the course of like a day, i see that some of it started to turn brown and dry/withered. Anyone know what this could be? (it's hot and summertime but I think I have been watering enough....) thanks!
q my poor mint plant has brown withered areas help , gardening, plant care
  13 answers
  • Carol Stewart Carol Stewart on Aug 22, 2016
    mine is almost all brown just a few maybe 3 live ones left why? Help!

  • Janet Pizaro Janet Pizaro on Aug 22, 2016
    At this time of season many plants need re-potting. Pull the mint plant out of your container and check the root system.If all the roots are tangled carefully pull them down trim as needed repot and give it water.

  • Laurie Laurie on Aug 23, 2016
    Healthy roots are white and supple. If the roots are dry, brown and brittle they have died. There are probably good roots in there somewhere.

  • Bra7335907 Bra7335907 on Aug 23, 2016
    It can't take the direct sun.

  • Three Dogs in a Garden Three Dogs in a Garden on Aug 23, 2016
    The brown spots are probably one of a few fungal problems. If the brown or black spots are on the underside with a corresponding yellow splotch on the top of the leaves, suspect rust, a fungal infection. Caused by Puccinia menthae, mint rust mainly infects peppermint and spearmint. Destroy infected mint plants. Prevent mint rust by watering the plant at soil level and p be providing good air circulation around and within it. It also might be web blight. Although web blight commonly infects the mint’s main stem, it may also latch onto lower leaves, causing spotting and the death of the leaves. The disease may enter your home on new plants or cuttings. Unfortunately, you must remove, bag and discard the infected mint plant and its soil. Scrub the growing container with soap and water and soak it for 15 minutes in a solution of one part household bleach and 10 parts of water. Rinse the pot thoroughly after disinfecting it. Unfortunately, you must remove, bag and discard the infected mint plant and its soil. Scrub the growing container with soap and water and soak it for 15 minutes in a solution of one part household bleach and 10 parts of water. Rinse the pot thoroughly after disinfecting it. There is one other possibility. Tomato spotted wilt virus can also strike a number of plants, including mint. This virus is one of 20 species in the Tospovirus genus and is spread by thrips (Thripidae family). Although it is unusual indoors, it is possible to bring the pest in with new plants. Symptoms of tomato spotted wilt virus include dead growing tips and dead spots on the leaves. There is no cure for the disease and the best course of action is to remove the plant and dispose of it.

  • Johnchip Johnchip on Aug 23, 2016
    Mint is a mess. Cut back, tops weekly and roots and repot regularly. Never put it in a free range garden!

  • Debbie Debbie on Aug 23, 2016
    Could also be a combination of too much direct sunlight and too much wind.

    • Tova Pearl Tova Pearl on Aug 24, 2016
      I had no idea that wind could be a factor. We have had a lot of weather fluctuations and wind.

  • Sal9316258 Sal9316258 on Aug 23, 2016
    You may want to give it some more room. Even potted plants need to be watered every day. Be certain that the pot drains. Your mint may be too crowded. Cut out half and re-pot making 2 pots or move entire plant into a larger container. My mint is an old variety and on occasion gets brown spots on the leaves, and then those leaves die and fall off. I was told it was due to our crazy weather this year - too hot too fast, too cold, then too hot again. Once the weather calmed to a "normal" summer pattern, the mint looks great, fresh green leaves w/no spots! My mint is planted in the ground and has contained itself in one garden. Because we have terrific "golf course" bent grass - it is tougher than the mint and keeps the mint from spreading.

  • Could be the variety of mint too. I have mint, planted in the ground in full sun where it gets very very hot in the summer and mine is extremely prolific. I have not had much luck growing in pots as they grow rapidly and become rootbound if not repotted often enough. I would check with a good local mursery as they would be able to better guide you and live in a similar climate. Good luck! And don't give up! Nothing like fresh mint to liven things up. :-)

  • Tova Pearl Tova Pearl on Aug 24, 2016
    Eep. It's much worse today. I'm going to have to try all your suggestions...

  • Heather Cummins Heather Cummins on Aug 24, 2016
    My 2 pots of mint stand in ice cream containers kept filled with water in a semi shaded area , to always have nice green leaves prune back some of the long leggy stalks..

  • Lynne Johnson Lynne Johnson on Aug 24, 2016
    I had a large container of mint that started dying suddenly. When I dug into the soil, I found an amazing number of grubs were eating underground. I had to dig out all the plants to get at them all. Then I had to buy a new plant and start again.

  • IFortuna IFortuna on Aug 24, 2016
    Check this site and it will tell you what is wrong.------https://www.plantvillage.org/en/topics/mint