WOW !! Any ideas what this is???

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This is a plant that came out of a butterfly garden that someone gave me ! It has no leaves so far . She was moving and she had a lot of plants for me to dig up!! The leaf you see in the picture is a dead leaf from another plant. The "pom pom" flower is approximatly the same size of a large saucer ! I have never seen one of these and she has moved so I can't ask her!!! Any ideas????
q wow any ideas what this is, flowers, gardening
q wow any ideas what this is, flowers, gardening
  62 answers
  • Nancy Hatcher Nancy Hatcher on Jun 01, 2013
    This looks like an allium and I think it's from the firecracker series.
  • Rita Rita on Jun 01, 2013
    It is an alium. I agree with nancy.
  • Brenda Faulkner Brenda Faulkner on Jun 01, 2013
    I agree.
  • Sheila Suarez Sheila Suarez on Jun 01, 2013
    Perfect !!!!!!! I just love this site with so many helpful people !!!!!! Many, many thanks! Now I can look it up online! yipee!!!
  • Linnya Linnya on Jun 01, 2013
    I really like it what ever its name is
  • Debra Peters Debra Peters on Jun 01, 2013
    I agree with Linnya - gorgeous!!
  • Janice R Janice R on Jun 02, 2013
    this is called a powder puff lily they will multiply yearlly and are beautiful
  • Tammy@Deja Vue Designs Tammy@Deja Vue Designs on Jun 02, 2013
    That's a blood lily
  • Sherri Sherri on Jun 02, 2013
    kind of looks like a spider mum. If so, the foliage dies then the flower comes up
  • Nancy Hand Nancy Hand on Jun 02, 2013
    In south Georgia we call it "Surprise Lily" or "Spider Lily" because it blooms before the foliage comes up. Its a Lycoris.
  • Lori J Lori J on Jun 02, 2013
    Here in Nebraska, our Surprise Lilies are pink and more lily-like. They also seem to shoot up out of nowhere and I believe are rather late bloomers, by lily standards.
  • June June on Jun 02, 2013
    Lori, you are right about surprise Lilies. They are also called Naked Ladies because the foliage dies long before the flower appears.
  • Jessie Hammond Jessie Hammond on Jun 02, 2013
    Red Spider Lily : Family: Amaryllidaceae (am-uh-ril-id-AY-see-ee) Species: radiata (rad-ee-AY-tuh) (Info) Synonym:Lycoris radiata var. radiata Category: Bulbs Height: 12-18 in. (30-45 cm) Spacing: 6-9 in. (15-22 cm) Hardiness: USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F) USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F) USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F) USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F) USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F) USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F) Sun Exposure: Sun to Partial Shade Danger: Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested Bloom Color: Red Bloom Time: Late Summer/Early Fall Mid Fall - Late Fall/Early Winter Foliage: Herbaceous Smooth-Textured Other details: Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater Soil pH requirements: 7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline) Propagation Methods: By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets) Seed Collecting: N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed
  • Julie Gibson Julie Gibson on Jun 02, 2013
    In this part of FL we call them hurricane lilies because they usually bloom during hurricane season
  • Elaine Simmons Elaine Simmons on Jun 02, 2013
    Surprise lilies have a lot of names but I like "Naked Ladies" best. With no foliage when they bloom, they really do look naked. In the midwest, as Lori said, they are definitely not a Surprise Lily.
  • The Blooming Gardener The Blooming Gardener on Jun 02, 2013
    Janice and Tammy are right....it is Powder Puff Lily and called Blood Lily as well. So similar to Allium Schuberti in looks but there are differences. Has a lot of the look of Spider lily too, but it is Haemanthus multiflorum...look it up and see the little separate star burts combine to be the puff.
  • Ripples Ripples on Jun 02, 2013
    Yep, Haemanthus.
  • Judy Judy on Jun 02, 2013
    Found it online....Football Lily, African Blood Lily, Powderpuff Lily http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2440/#b Naked Ladies aka Surprise Lilies do not look anything like this & bloom in the Fall, not Spring. Way too many people slap the name Naked Ladies on anything that sends up a stalk without even bothering to look up a picture of them. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaryllis
  • Gail Salminen Gail Salminen on Jun 02, 2013
    @Sheila Suarez I think I found the site that has information on this - it is a blood lily http://www.csmonitor.com/The-Culture/Gardening/diggin-it/2010/1001/Blood-lily-a-ball-of-fire-in-a-flower-pot
  • Mikell Paulson Mikell Paulson on Jun 02, 2013
    Very pretty what ever it is called!!
  • Cathy Kurpil Cathy Kurpil on Jun 02, 2013
    Wish I had some whatever they are! These aren't the ones that grow into trees are they? We have powder puff trees here in Florida
  • Caroline Pfeiffer Caroline Pfeiffer on Jun 02, 2013
    Looks like it's in the allium family
  • Sharry Speaks Closter Sharry Speaks Closter on Jun 02, 2013
    Red Spider Lily. They are highly sought after bulbs. So if you like them keep them.
  • Shirley L Shirley L on Jun 02, 2013
    Hi, I have these also. Everyone I know calls them a lilly, they start to bloom in early summer. The blooms die but the leaves stay on all summer. I guess they r feeding the bulb. Oh they multiply so U need to divide them. They also live great in a container. Mine are in the shade.
  • Mercedes McFarland Mercedes McFarland on Jun 02, 2013
    One just appeared in my shrubs..... I have no idea what it was and was looking everywhere on the internet to find what these kind were called......WOW was the word on how beautiful it was...I didn't disturb it and left it where it is growing.......I hope to see some more :)
  • Vicki Yawn Andrews Vicki Yawn Andrews on Jun 02, 2013
    We've always called them Pop Up Lilies but I'm sure they have a more scientific name. Beautiful no matter the name.
  • Kate F Kate F on Jun 03, 2013
    Looks like an Allium. My just blossomed this week though they are purple.
  • Darlene Mapes Darlene Mapes on Jun 03, 2013
    When I lived in Mississippi they called them spider lilies. They would sprout up in the darnedest places
  • Cherry henson Cherry henson on Jun 03, 2013
    I grew up in Cuthbert, Ga. we call them spider lilies. you want see folage until the bloom dies, it is a small bulb.
  • Jackie Smith Jackie Smith on Jun 03, 2013
    Here in Mississippi we call them "Naked Ladies" because they have no leaves, just a beautiful bloom. They will spread on their own & you can transplant them to beds also.
  • Judy B Judy B on Jun 03, 2013
    Definitely, a spider lily.
  • Sherrie S Sherrie S on Jun 03, 2013
    I was going to post mine because I didn't know what it was. It really is pretty and seems to like shade.
  • Judy Judy on Jun 03, 2013
    Cathy Kurpil, I think your Powderpuff tree might be another name for the Mimosa tree.....I've always wanted one.
  • Anita Faircloth Anita Faircloth on Jun 03, 2013
    I guess every area has its own names for plants. These are all around the Florida panhandle and we call them fireball lilies. As stated by others, there is no foliage until after the bloom dies. To us, a spider lily is more like a vine, but with a tuber instead of a bulb, and the flower is red & yellow and more spider like.
  • Margie  Newman Margie Newman on Jun 03, 2013
    Darlene, I used to live in Sugar Run back in 2001-2003....Wonderful little town; great people....we miss it very much. I was shocked to see your posting!!! Love your flowers........
  • April E April E on Jun 04, 2013
    this is Scadoxus multiflorus or the blood lily it originated from Africa
  • Sandusky198 Sandusky198 on Jun 04, 2013
    Here in Tennessee we call it a spider lily. It's related to the magic lily as the foliage comes up...dies back.....and then a single stalk appears with this unusual red flower! It usually blooms in late summer.
  • The Blooming Gardener The Blooming Gardener on Jun 04, 2013
    It is not a spider lily, very very similar looking, but compare the photo to Lycoris, and it is not quite the same, And it is not a naked lady either, just because it blooms without foliage. It is very different to Amarylis, though all these are really beautiful to have in gardens, even grow all three together in one spot would be fun, though this photo shows a powder puff lily...if anyone actually wanted exactly this one, getting either one of the others would not grow the flower in the photo. Sheila and Gail posted links showing the flower in the photo exactly like Sheila posted. The other picture that came from her of the lavender ones are Hidden Ginger
  • Soniya Borkar Soniya Borkar on Jun 04, 2013
    Its known as May ball flower as it blooms here in the month of May and lasts the whole month.
  • Maryfennell Maryfennell on Jun 04, 2013
    I had one and they called mine a Blood Lily.
  • Sheila Suarez Sheila Suarez on Jun 04, 2013
    You all have been great to answer my question !!! And also neat to know it comes from Africa ! This woman had it in her butterfly garden along with her other many, many types of plants ...I still have some suprise plants that are coming up, .....can't wait to see what they turn into !! Thanks to every one of you a thousand times over!!!!! Happy gardening!! This is a great site with everyone from all over the place ....it's interesting to see, even with this plant , how far of an area it grows !!
  • Marion Griffith Marion Griffith on Jun 05, 2013
    It is a spider lilly. The blooms open and then much later, like months, the leaves appear.
  • Sharry Speaks Closter Sharry Speaks Closter on Jun 05, 2013
    The Blooming Gardener is "Wrong" about these. I have them all over my yards, front, back and side yards too. They are Amaryillis, RED SPIDER. Contact RAREBULBS on Ebay and he might have his own web site by now and you'll know that I'm right.
  • The Blooming Gardener The Blooming Gardener on Jun 05, 2013
    Sharry post a picture of yours...about ten other replies are "Wrong too" if I am, check the links they posted, showing identical flowers. This picture is not a spider lily. You have to use some Botany to see how different they are...I don't care if I am wrong, which I am not, just helping get the correct id is the goal, not trying to be difficult.
  • Sherrie S Sherrie S on Jun 05, 2013
    I know mine are called Fireball lily or blood lily and they are beautiful and look like your posting. I also have spider lillies and your plant doesn't look like my spider lily. Who knows for sure?
  • Sheila Suarez Sheila Suarez on Jun 05, 2013
    well , according to some of the posts , the leaves don't come out before the flower dies.....within the past few days the leaves are up and looking good, as well as the flower itself !! It has been pouring rain here and the flower is drooping a little but that I think is because of the amount of water on the flower head because it still looks great!!! I'm sure there are different "nicknames" for this flower, I'm just thankful I have some name to start with!!!!!!! Thank you all again !!!
  • Sharry Speaks Closter Sharry Speaks Closter on Jun 06, 2013
    I stand corrected, it is a blood lily. I admit when I'm wrong as I went on a search and I found it to be a blood lily. Sorry blooming gardener. It will die off and come back next year.
  • Sherrie S Sherrie S on Jun 06, 2013
    My plant also has leaves and flowers. I added my photo to show the plant.
  • April E April E on Jun 06, 2013
    the reason I posted the botanical name is because THAT doesn't change with local like the common names people you are all posting and reposting to try to make your point and you are ALL right but the common names differ however you are all talking about Scadoxus multiflorus ok now quit trying to be the ONLY RIGHT 1
  • Sheila Suarez Sheila Suarez on Jun 06, 2013
    The name Blood Lily is fine with me, and makes no difference who is wrong or right, whether it's a common name or botanical name...., everyone had fun trying to help and that's what this site is for as far as I can see, even if it is just a guess !!! Thank you all again! And Sherrie S, that's exactly my plant!!!
  • The Blooming Gardener The Blooming Gardener on Jun 07, 2013
    Scadoxus multilora is the new botanical name for Haemanthus multiflorum, which I posted five days ago, as common names are so variable, a common name is sometimes the same name used for plants in completely different genuses. (Like African Daisy, there are five different genus of daisy like flowers called African daisy...) I also was not guessing, and would not post unless I was absolutely certain that I was giving a correct I.D. and was only trying to help....
  • The Blooming Gardener The Blooming Gardener on Jun 07, 2013
    Sharry Speaks Closter Winchester, CA ""The Blooming Gardener is "Wrong" about these. I have them all over my yards, front, back and side yards too. They are Amaryillis, RED SPIDER. Contact RAREBULBS on Ebay and he might have his own web site by now and you'll know that I'm right."" I would also never post that someone is "Wrong" followed by 'and that you'll know I'm right' even if later admitting you stand corrected. It wasn't a contest for who is more right, but to help ID what is this plant :(
  • Sherrie S Sherrie S on Jun 07, 2013
    Right Shelia - your plant and mine are twins. Since I'm no expert I use the names I can remember and spell. I figured you could google or bing Blood Lily and make your own decision. I love HomeTalk where I often get help with my many plants.
  • Geri cottman Geri cottman on Jun 09, 2013
    I call them surprise lillies because u never know when they will come up
  • Sheila Suarez Sheila Suarez on Jun 12, 2013
    It sure was a "surprise" to me Geri !!!! And a great one at that! .....and Sherrie, I'm no expert either and don't pretend to be !!! I'm just loving the help from this site, and if nothing else I'm finding out if I have the plants planted in the right spot !!!!!! :)
  • Debra Peters Debra Peters on Jun 13, 2013
    "A rose by any other name is still a rose..." What ever it is, it is gorgeous - wish I had me one!! lol
  • Shirley L Shirley L on Sep 15, 2014
    Yes they R red Blood Lilies.....the flower has long died but my leaves r green and gorgeous......MY yard is full of what we around here call Hurricane Lillies....Maybe because there R 2 Hurricanes out in the oceans today.......anyway, they R beautiful....about 30 of them..:)
  • Lene Adelskov McQueen Lene Adelskov McQueen on Jul 03, 2015
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scadoxus_multiflorus The blood lily (Scadoxus multiflorus) is a rhizomatous, evergreen perennial that is native to Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The most distinguishing feature of this plant is its flower-head. Its former name, Haemanthus translates to blood flower, referring to the color. Although they bloom for only a week or two, when they’re in full flower, the blood lily makes quite a conversation piece in the garden. Topping off each 8- to 10-inch tall plant is a huge spherical orange-red umbel of nearly 200 tiny flowers. Each plant will produce only one of these magnificent flower-heads in a season. Short-lived, yet, spectacular sight. The leaves of the blood lily are large and thin, remaining green year round. Once the flower heads have stopped blooming, they form green berries that eventually become scarlet-colored throughout winter. These decorative berries can remain on the plant for up to 2 months.
  • Brenda Turnquest Brenda Turnquest on Jul 04, 2015
    They are alliums (perennials). (I think I spelled it right)
  • Sue Kiene Sue Kiene on Sep 02, 2016
    I agree with blood lily
  • Jonee Moreman Jonee Moreman on Sep 18, 2016
    We call them spider lillies. After they bloom the bulb will send up a clump of long green shoots that look similar to monkey grass. The bulb needs the foliage to store energy so it will bloom next year and multiply like daffodils. Leave it alone and let it die back naturally and next fall it should rebloom and possibly multiply.
  • Jgibson Jgibson on May 18, 2021

    Spider lily