Karen Robinson
Karen Robinson
  • Hometalker
  • Bunnell, FL
Asked on Jul 13, 2013

What Type of Plant is This??

Bab5982502Mary Kaye GooddingMagz
+43

Answered

My husband bought me this plant for Mother's Day and when I didn't find any identifying tag, I asked him what it was. He had no clue. Some handicapped students were selling them and he bought it for me. I love the plant. In fact, from the pictures you can see how it is multiplying. I am growing more of them. The gift that keeps on giving. (I think it my be a type of kalanchoe, but not sure.)
This is the plant my husband bought me a little over a month ago.  It has quadrupled in size.  I can tell that it's a succulent.  Maybe a kalanchoe?
This is the plant my husband bought me a little over a month ago. It has quadrupled in size. I can tell that it's a succulent. Maybe a kalanchoe?
The little curls on the edge of the leaf fall off and begin new plants.
The little curls on the edge of the leaf fall off and begin new plants.
Here is a picture of the parent plant and a few of the 'babies' and I've started in their own pots.
Here is a picture of the parent plant and a few of the 'babies' and I've started in their own pots.
44 answers
  • Barbara Mccrary
    on Jul 13, 2013

    its what I was told a deer tongue

  • Karen Robinson
    on Jul 13, 2013

    I finally found a picture of my plant on the internet. It is called a kalanchoe daigremontiana. Also called Mother of Thousands, Alligator Plant, and Mexican Hat. I also discovered that the plant is poisonous. It is easy to take care of...needs little watering and will flower in the spring. Guess I should have researched a little more before posting. Thanks. And if anyone has any experience with the plant, I would love some pointers.

  • Jamala W
    on Jul 13, 2013

    it's called mother of thousands,,,.. Love that plant... When you pluck off the little buds and put them in dirt..they'll grow more

  • Jamala W
    on Jul 13, 2013

    it's in the kalanchoe family

  • Karen Robinson
    on Jul 14, 2013

    Thanks Jamala. I just love this plant.

  • Lisa McKinnon
    on Jul 14, 2013

    Very pretty...

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jul 14, 2013

    Karen, I would be very careful with that plant here in Florida. Mother of thousands is an understatement. Mother of millions is more like it. You will soon have them everywhere!

  • Tanya Peterson Felsheim
    on Jul 14, 2013

    to me its an ugly plant! sorry...

  • Don Payne
    on Jul 15, 2013

    my mother had one of these and she called it an airplane plant. i think because it was always dropping the little ones off.

  • Lynn
    on Jul 15, 2013

    I love the way nature takes care of itself (in the right environment!) and when I had it I was so happy to see all the babies. It likes dry and hot.......good for our TX drought!

  • Elaine Simmons
    on Jul 15, 2013

    Don Payne, what we call an airplane plant in Iowa looks nothing like this. The ones we have here have long shoots that fall away from the main plant.

  • Alice Vick
    on Jul 15, 2013

    We called it the Gossip plant, because it spreads faster than anything!

  • Su
    on Jul 15, 2013

    Alligator tears is what I was told it was called

  • Debbie Gaertner
    on Jul 15, 2013

    We call it the pregnant plant. I have found that the bigger the pot the bigger the plant gets. I love it have grown several from the little babies. I have not had mine flower however. The plant stick with the info said good indoors or out, but not winter weather. Probably would be ok in Florida.

  • Tabby
    on Jul 15, 2013

    maternity plant in southern Illinois. Perfect or Mother's Day haha

  • April E
    on Jul 15, 2013

    Kalanchoe daigremontiana mother of thousands its a great plant needs good light and to go DRY between waterings, however don't let it stay dry

  • Doreen Nestell
    on Jul 16, 2013

    I am laughing so hard at the answers. I love all the names. Each one is true to this plant. Spreading, gossiping, pregnant, thousands, millions... O:) just too funny. I will be praying for you. These are taking over my yard here in FL.

  • Nadlou
    on Jul 16, 2013

    The blooms are unusual, attract hummingbirds and make the plant worth growing (in my humble opinion!)

  • Maggie Lais
    on Jul 16, 2013

    I had one of these when I was a teenager. I actually think I sent for it in a magazine! It was called Mother of Thousands! I really loved this plant, because I didn't have to do much and it reproduced all over the place! I wouldn't advise growing it outside, especially anywhere it can be invasive, since those types of plants can become permanent invaders, can cost tens of thousands of dollars to control, and the worst part? If it isn't native, it can take over entire ecological niches, eradicating the native plants, and the things that benefit from the plants... etc... Really can be a very serious problem. Just ask anyone from Florida about Kudzu! and then there are insects and sea creatures: gypsy moths, and non-native thistles... some water lilies, lampreys, oh so many examples ...

  • Sandra T
    on Jul 16, 2013

    yes it is mother of many

  • Karen Robinson
    on Jul 16, 2013

    Thanks, Maggie Lais and Doug Hunt. I am only allowing it to grow in a pot and only put it out front to get sun in the morning. I have been throwing the majority of the 'babies' down the toilet as don't want them to spread anymore than I can control. I will definitely be careful.

  • Wanda sinnema
    on Jul 16, 2013

    Iwas given one about 35 yrs ago,,, slightly different leaves,puffier...ours was called MATERNITY plant,,,lost it in a move,,NEVER found one since..no one has ever heard of my plant..

  • Sally
    on Jul 16, 2013

    This is poisonous to animals, I got rid of the one I had,

  • Jodie Bristow
    on Jul 16, 2013

    Hallelujah!!! Thank you Karen Robinson for posting your pictures!! I have some Hen's and Chicks growing and out of nowhere this plant popped up and is now growing babies. Now I know I need to get it out of my Hen's and Chicks and maybe transplant it somewhere else. I don't have animals but good to know it is poisonous to them. Thanks you all for giving my plant a name or names! Being a mother of six I think I will call mine "Mother of MANY"lol thanks all.

  • Karen Robinson
    on Jul 17, 2013

    Wanda sinnema, it's hard to tell from the pictures, but you can feel that it is a thicker leaf (a succulent).

  • Nadlou
    on Jul 17, 2013

    It's not invasive where I live in SoCal... I have it in a dry, hot area and in a shaded, watered area and it hasn't taken over in either place. It's been there several years now.

  • Karen Robinson
    on Jul 17, 2013

    Nice to know, Nadlou. Yet, I'm still going to keep her in her pot. :)

  • Peg
    on Jul 17, 2013

    it is one of the kalanchoes Karen. There are several varieties that make "babies" like this. I've brought some home when I was in Florida that grew wild.

  • Donna
    on Jul 19, 2013

    I've too have always known it to be called Mother of Thousands. I grow it outside in Central Florida & while it does spread, it dies back in winter & I've never had it take over an area.

  • Doe Jackson
    on Jul 26, 2013

    I've known it as Sombrero Plant or Mother of Thousands. We can't grow it outside in my part of Canada.

    • Peg
      on Aug 14, 2013

      @Doe Jackson That's the nickname I was trying to get out of the recesses of my brain! Sombrero Plant! It's amazing how many nicknames there are for so many plants!

  • Jodie Bristow
    on Aug 13, 2013

    Mine started growing in the winter with my Hen's and Chicks here in California, so i'm curious to see what it does come winter.

  • Angelique DeMarco
    on Sep 7, 2013

    Mother of Many or Mother of Thousands...I had one as well....lost it several years ago and cannot find another :(

  • Debbie Dillon
    on Dec 17, 2013

    Josie, I have been looking for one of these and would love to have one or more. If you could think of a way to get one to me I would love one. goober375@yahoo.com

  • Sandra Creel
    on Dec 17, 2013

    My sister had one like this that was growing out the side of a porch. I grow mine in shade part sun etc. I have a couple that were sprouting out of my brick steps. I've never heard that they were bad for animals. If anyone knows more about this please post.

  • Jeanne Marie Miller
    on Jan 15, 2014

    Bryophyllum daigremontianum, also called Mother of Thousands, Alligator Plant, or Mexican Hat Plant is a succulent plant native to Madagascar. Like other members of the genus Bryophyllum, it is able to propagate vegetatively from plantlets that develop on the leaf edges. All parts of the plant are poisonous (they contain daigremontianin and other bufadienolides), which can even be fatal if ingested by infants or small pets. I was given a small plant by my son. I do enjoy watching the development of the plantlets.

  • Cbe1924689
    on Jul 8, 2015

    My Mother had one and always called it the "pregnant plant" because it produced so many baby plants. I have looked over the years for one with no luck. I remember Mom starting plants for half the town lol.

  • Fab and Pretty
    on Jul 8, 2015

    @Cbeldin lol

  • Wanda sinnema
    on Jul 9, 2015

    It has several names...Originally I heard it as maternity plant. back in the early 1970's.. Have tried to find it for years.. Lost mine in a move....

  • Melinda Teal
    on Jul 12, 2015

    Don't know name but its kill it if you can plant becase it will root from leave. And all the little clones on the sides will grow practically from the time they fall from hosting plant.

  • Eli mackewich
    on Jul 12, 2015

    They are the best plants ever I call them the forever plant because you can keep them going forever.

  • Kathy Roberts
    on Jul 12, 2015

    I have heard It called Mother of Millions.

  • Magz
    on Jul 12, 2015

    Mother of millions x

  • Mary Kaye Goodding
    on Aug 22, 2015

    I vote for Mother of Millions. My kids called it the pregnant plant. They always had to take a plant to school at some point. I would always give them one of these, they never failed! They never had to do anything and the teacher always asked if they could have it. Be careful, they fall off into other plants and every where. Don't feel like you can't pull and move it. They will even grow floating in water! Have fun!

  • Bab5982502
    on May 29, 2016

    I've always called it an Alligator plant.

Your comment...