Light Up Address Numbers - 3 Options

3 Materials
$6
10 Minutes
Easy

Creating an option that is right for you to light up your address numbers is inexpensive and easy. Here are 3 different ways to do so...

For the first option you'll need:

Mason jars and the lids - one per address number
Solar lights (Dollar Tree) - one per jar
Sharpie or paint marker
Using a stencil or free hand, draw you numbers onto each mason jar. If you'd rather use vinyl sticker numbers that would work as well.

Pull the solar light stem off the light.
Place the light into the mason jar ring lid.
That's it for the first one. Make sure to place this somewhere where your solar lights will get plenty of light.
For the second option you'll need:

Glass Block (Craft stores - can get on sale for $5)
Plug in light (Dollar Tree or Craft Stores)
Vinyl number stickers (Craft Stores)
Place your numbers on your glass block.
Put your light in the bottom of the glass block. You could use a 20 strand of lights as well.
Plug in and that's it. This is a great option for those who have covered porches and don't get enough light to charge solar lights.
Option 3 - you'll need:

Recycled bottles - one per number of your address (mine are coffee syrup bottles)

Solar Lights (Dollar Tree) - one per bottle

Reflective Numbers (Walmart)

Place the reflective number stickers on the bottles.

Pull the base off the solar lights.
Place the solar light on top. I would recommend using silicone or a glue of your choice to adhere the lights into place.

Optional - add some dollar store rocks for weight or some water to enhance the brightness.
You can see me make this and more on Hometalk's Facebook Live Monday, March 27th at 1pm EST.
I would love to have you stop by my blog    Chas' Crazy Creations  for the full tutorial as well as sign up for my latest creations, posts, recipes, exclusives, and more...

I would love for you to subscribe to my YouTube channel to see more of my crazy creations - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIOsMN7hycVRco-MROXwmXg

Suggested materials:

  • Jars
  • Marker
  • Solar lights

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Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

3 of 4 questions
  • Carol
    Carol
    on Mar 26, 2017

    Have have some glass blocks but they do not have holes in them, did you make holes or get them that way, also if you made the holes how did you do it?

    • Artemis
      Artemis
      on Jun 7, 2017

      When you’re drilling into glass (always with a diamond bit) it’s best to start at a slight angle until you’ve scored the glass; then tip your drill straight up to finish making the hole. Also, depending on the size of the hole you need, you may want to start with a smaller bit and work your way up. If you try to drill straight in, without the scoring, the bit tries to travel around the glass and can be difficult to start (unless, of course, you have a drill press). As others have mentioned, go SLOW and use as much water as possible. I have a spray bottle for some jobs, but if I can, I’ll fill a bucket with water (deeper than my glass object), then fill the bottle or jar with water and put it upside down in the bucket (keep as much water in the bottle/jar as you can. The closer the water is to the surface of where you’re cutting the better. Diamond bits are not cheap, so treat them well. Hope this helps.
  • Linda Lavallee
    Linda Lavallee
    on Apr 28, 2018

    I love all the projects, but one question. When you put solar lights in mason jars what do you put around them to keep them from falling over in jar? Love your site.

    • Kathy Gallow
      Kathy Gallow
      on Feb 9, 2019

      I have some hanging and did silicone them to start, they popped from the heat buildup inside the jar. I just set them on top, occasionally they get some water in the jars, I just empty. Seems to work better not to seal, anyway for me.

  • Christine
    Christine
    on Jul 14, 2019

    Couldn't you use clear bottles with the house numbers on them and then fill with water. Put your light source underneath the bottle and it turns in into a flashlight of sorts. I'm trying this when I get home

    • Ida9464
      Ida9464
      on Sep 7, 2019

      I don’t understand how to have the light source underneath. Please explain . Love these super cute ideas!’

Join the conversation

3 of 47 comments
  • TNflash
    TNflash
    on Aug 22, 2020

    Can't you also use light weight clear hard plastic containers instead of glass? I mounted mine on a board to keep them from falling over and to make it easy to mount the lights. You can easily attach the plastic containers to the board by using glue or a pan head wood screw. If your containers are tall and you use a screw in the bottom to attach it, I recommend that you first drill a small screw hole in the bottom of the container. Then use a magnetic screw driver or a piece of tape to hold the screw to the screwdriver so you can insert the screw through the top and down into the drilled hole in the bottom. Keep pressure on the head of the screw with your screwdriver while you align the container on the board then tighten the screw into the board. With the containers attached to the board you can now mount the board where you want to place you house number light. Keep in mind the following tips when surveying for a place for your new light house number.

    1) The fire department, police, and friends need to be able to see the house numbers from the street. That is the light's main purpose.

    2) The more direct sunlight the house number solar panels get the longer the lights will shine at night. In the winter the sun is low on in the sky. The sunny areas that get full sun in the summer, maybe in the shadows of other buildings or evergreen trees in winter. Try to mount the solar panels where they get full sun in the winter months.

    3)Places where you mount the lighted street number could be the top of your mail box, in the grass beside your drive way, on the handrail of your porch or the wall of your house. Some neighborhood associations specify where the house number has to be located. If you have a neighborhood association, avoid problems ahead of time by checking to see if there are any size and location guidelines.

    4) The battery inside the solar light will grow weak after several months. For maintenance reasons, do not mount the house number where getting to it in the future is a problem.

    5) If your house number light is mounted where rain can get inside the light containers, you should drill a few small weep holes in the bottom of the plastic containers to allow the water to drain out. The small holes will keep the inside dryer to prevent algae growth and help keep insects out of your house number sign.

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