Caring for a "Bleeding Heart"

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I planted a Bleeding heart Bush in the spring using just a root from a home and garden store. It turns yellow after rainfall then after a few days, the leaves will be bright green again. I followed all the instructions, but I am a rookie at this. Is this a normal growth cycle? It is currently about 8" tall. Should it be growing faster than the current rate it is now? Any advice on making it grow stronger, I live in Georgia and the summer weather is unpredictable. Not to mention the red clay we have to work with!
bleeding heart plant care, gardening, The yellow after a consistent rainfall
The yellow after a consistent rainfall.
bleeding heart plant care, gardening
  22 answers
  • Bleeding hearts do this. Do not worry. At one point they sometimes they slowly fade away. In GA as well as here, they love shade more and to be in a moist environment. Do not worry yet because this is the first year-old saying goes "the first year sleeps, second year, second year creeps, and third year leaps" Just keep it from drying out the first year. good luck and happy gardening

  • Barb Rosen Barb Rosen on Jul 19, 2014
    Many varieties of Bleeding Hearts are spring ephemerals, meaning they fade away after their bloom time. Just keep it watered as it gets established. It may even die back entirely and the reappear next spring! Here's some more information : http://gardening.about.com/od/plantprofile1/p/Bleeding-Heart.htm

  • Andrea Minyon Andrea Minyon on Jul 19, 2014
    Thank you. I try to look on websites for information but the garden terms and definitions are still new to me. Asking on here always gives me the answers I need in' layman's' terms!

  • Pam Shoesmith Probasco Pam Shoesmith Probasco on Jul 20, 2014
    A few years ago when I planted my bleeding hearts, I thought they died during the summer. But they were back the next spring, bigger and better! They just don't like the heat. This year our weather has been wetter and cooler and they still look good although starting to yellow some. But they'll be fine! Hang in there!

  • Lori Jackson Lori Jackson on Jul 20, 2014
    Agreed...don't mourn the loss of this one until (and if) it does not re-emerge in the spring. I did have one not come back years ago, but my others are healthy. Mine begin to yellow and fade the minute the temps become really summerlike.

  • NancyLee NancyLee on Jul 20, 2014
    Last spring I moved to a new home - didn't even know there was a bleeding heart until it blossomed. It seemed to grow at least 3 inches a day! After it bloomed, the foliage became, well, unsightly, shall we say? It was so woody like and discolored. I cut it all the way down to the ground. This spring it came back even more beautifully! Again grew from the ground up to about 4-5 feet within days (well, not days but it seemed like it! Hehehehehe.....) I cut it down again after blooming was over. Here's a picture from this spring (I don't have one of the whole plant).......

  • Patti @Hearth and Vine Patti @Hearth and Vine on Jul 20, 2014
    It will come back. It isn't you! Mine has done this many times. This year it has been cool and wet and its still around but it has died back many times and always returns. If for some reason it doesn't try something new.

  • Somewhat Quirky Somewhat Quirky on Jul 20, 2014
    I cut mine back to the ground every July when they get funky.

  • Wendy Wendy on Jul 20, 2014
    I planted mine about 10 years ago, and they are doing great. I have found from living in different town, that they like a north facing well draining soil. Now mine do get the afternoon sun, and in the summer it get's about 85 degree. I leave them and continue to water through out the summer. I hope this will give you some encouragement. just love them for what they are. I'm sure they will come back in the spring big and strong. Good luck.

  • Ruth Ruth on Jul 20, 2014
    They thrive in the shade. Maybe too much sun?

  • JBug JBug on Jul 20, 2014
    Bleeding hearts do this after they are done blooming and will come back again in the spring. A horticulturist shared a great verse with me. When you plant a plant in the ground - just remember...the first year they sleep; the second year they creep and the third year they leap.

    • See 2 previous
    • BONNIE J BONNIE J on Jul 20, 2014
      @Andrea Minyon LUCKY YOU! JUST KEEP READING & LEARNING. LOTS ON THE INTERNET. GET YOURSELF A GOOD GARDENING BOOK & JUST EXPERIMENT! I HAVE AT LEAST 6 PLANTS I WENT OUT & BOUGHT AFTER I PICKED OUT A BOOK FOR MY AREA, AFTER 4 YEARS THEY R LOOKING & DOING GREAT!! I'M SO HAPPY U R LOOKING AFTER ALL THE WORK & LOVE THE FORMER OWNERS PUT INTO THAT PLACE. SO OFTEN PEOPLE JUST TEAR EVERYTHING OUT. I WORRY AFTER I GO NOONE WILL LOOK AFTER ALL MY BABIES. GOOD FOR U, ANDREA!

  • Kathy C Kathy C on Jul 20, 2014
    I live in Virginia and mine do this yearly. I have to mark where they are in the ground so I don't plant something else there. They reappear every spring and last until the heat forces them into dormancy. No worries.

  • Andrea Minyon Andrea Minyon on Jul 20, 2014
    Thank you all for the input and easing my worries!

  • Donna Shaner Donna Shaner on Jul 20, 2014
    They are also easy to divide and you can get many plants to put where ever you like. My exsperience is the same as the others who have commented. They grow really fast in the spring, then yellow and die back in the heat of summer. You can cut them back and they will reappear in the spring. They are so pretty when they are in bloom.

  • Judy Judy on Jul 20, 2014
    Years ago I had Dicentra formosa (western, wild or Pacific bleeding heart) aka Fern Leaf Bleeding Heart, originally taken from the wild. I planted it along the East side of the house & it quickly spread to the whole length of the bed. It seemed to prefer the partial shade in N Oregon so I'm sure it would be happier in partial shade in warmer Ga.

  • Julia Brown Julia Brown on Jul 20, 2014
    Is there a possibility that you are growing a bleeding heard that has golden foliage? http://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/1194/gold-heart-bleeding-heart/

  • Julia Brown Julia Brown on Jul 20, 2014
    A bleeding heart-sigh.....

  • Paula Paula on Jul 20, 2014
    Hope I am not repeating anyone. There are 2 types of Bleeding Hearts. The ones that have more color and only bloom in the spring then turn yellow and die off, and the others with tighter leaves and not as brightly colored that last all summer. The ones you have look like the spring ones. Enjoy them while you can, then cut them back and let your other summer perennials cover the stubs. Enjoy !!

  • Janet Janet on Jul 21, 2014
    So glad to read these comments. I have my first Bleeding Hearts and thought they had died. So glad I can look forward to seeing them again in the spring.

  • Susan Blancette Susan Blancette on Jul 21, 2014
    I planted mine next to the porch in the corner where it gets morning sun and shade in the afternoon and it got huge and had lots of flowers hope this helps

    • Andrea Minyon Andrea Minyon on Jul 22, 2014
      That's precisely how mine is planted. I watched my yard for days going through the daylight hours to find the location. Hope mine prospers such as yours!

  • Dorothy Dorothy on Jul 22, 2014
    Considered to be "ephemerals"....plants that come up in the spring, bloom and then die back and go dormant in summer heat. Mark where it is so you don't dig it up and plant something else in the same place. Shade lover so north side of house is often best location or under heavily shading trees. Plant with hosta and ferns and things like solomons seal. The Hosta and ferns will cover over and fill in the space during the summer when the bleeding heart is gone.

  • Martha Martha on Jul 22, 2014
    JBug, they really can leap! A house near me has them growing in the rain gutters!