Window Dressing and DIY Board and Batten Shutters for the Potting Shed


Adding some window dressing with decorative shutters has been on my to-do list. The challenge has been finding the size and width I needed, 18 x 48, and three shutters, hanging one in the middle between the windows to frame the window boxes. After pricing board and batten shutters online, I thought they would be easy to build.
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
Building board and batten shutters for the Potting Shed would also solve the dilemma of having to purchase two sets of shutters to give me the three I wanted, without one left over. These board and batten shutters were an easy DIY, that you can tackle in a weekend, with the painting most time-consuming part.

Cedar boards sounded like a perfect fit for shutters on my west-facing windows that take a beating from the sun. Cedar can stand up the weather and is resistant to shrinkage, warping, and insects.
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
We purchased (5) 1-in x 6-in x 8-ft cedar boards from Lowe’s. In the world of wood, the actual finished measurements of a 1 x 6 is 0.875-in x 5.5-inches.
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
To get the 18 inch width needed, we decided a build a spaced board & batten shutter, with a 3/4 inch space between the boards to add the extra 1 1/2 inches to the width. My hubby cut the 8 foot boards in half for 4 foot lengths. A 1-in x 4-in x 10-ft cedar board (actual measurement 0.875-in x 3.5-in) gave us the six 18 inch lengths for battens we needed.
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
The battens were attached with wood screws from the back, after placing the spacers between the boards. The cedar boards are reversible with a rough and a smooth side. I chose the rough side to add to some texture and contrast to the window boxes and so my painting and brush strokes didn’t have to be perfect.
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
I used Valspar Reserve Extreme Weather Paint + Primer, saving me the step of priming the boards before painting. It’s formulated for the southeast US and rainy, humid regions. I chose the color Spanish Tile, to match the window boxes and my red bench.
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
The window boxes were hung two years ago and are vinyl/ polyethylene material that can tolerate the UV rays and hold up to constant watering. They also have double wall design with a water reservoir to encourage root growth. The came from windowbox.com and have a 15 year limited warranty.
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
The window boxes were planted a month ago with a combination of petunias, angelonia, pentas, coleus and sweet potato vine, all summer annuals that can take the heat!
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
This is how the window side of the Potting Shed looked two years ago, before the additions of the window boxes, bench and shutters. You can see how she’s grown, here
window dressing and diy board and batten shutters for the potting shed
I’m pleased how well my red bench has held up after being outside for a year. It’s the Luciana® outdoor bench and is still available at Grandin Road. More photos and details at the link below!

Suggested materials:

  • (5) 1-in x 6-in x 8-ft cedar boards  (Lowe's)
  • (1)1-in x 4-in x 10-ft cedar board  (Lowe's)
  • Valspar® Reserve® Extreme Weather Paint + Primer/ color Spanish Tile  (Lowe's)
See all materials
Mary @ Home is Where the Boat Is

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

2 questions
  • Pg
    on May 27, 2017

    What did you use for spacers?
  • Bbr21558924
    on May 27, 2017

    They look great - how would you attach these to brick?
    • Sarah Beavers
      on May 30, 2017

      Hold your shutter up where it's supposed to go, mark the tops and bottoms of your cross boards in both spans (spaces between vertical boards) of the shutter. Find the center on both sides, upper and lower, top and bottom. You should have 4 places to drill per shutter. If you plan to drill into the actual brick, use a hammer drill. The easiest way is to drill into the mortar, with a concrete bit and then use concrete screws. If you buy a package of screws it will tell you the appropriate size bit to use, and may even supply it. Just remember to get screws long enough to go through the shutter and about an 1" or so into the wall. Since mortar is set back roughly 1/4", and the cross boards are roughly 1", (if the cross board is against the wall), you'd need 2 &1/4 to 2 &1/2 " long concrete screws. If you plan to have the horizontal boards facing out, add 3/4 inch to the length of the screws, ie. 3". Be sure to pre-drill the wood so it doesn't split. If you can, countersink the screws and fill the indentation with putty, sand, and paint.

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3 of 33 comments
  • Kate Taylor
    on Jun 18, 2017

    THIS ... is fantastic. Gorgeous design, quality craftsmanship and it looks truly inspired. Can't give this enough praise. Definitely "craft goals"
  • Kate Taylor
    on Jun 18, 2017

    Oh my gosh! NO way!! We just moved to Hickory, actually - but my sister lives in Ballantyne! Will have to check it out in person some time
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