DIY Hanging Shower Planter


We're officially obsessed with indoor gardening and plants in general. We decided that we needed plants in every single room, so we built our own 'raining' plant hanger. I was skeptical about how it would turn out, but I'm actually really in love with it. It took us less than an hour to build and was easy to hang from the ceiling. Make one for your shower using our guide below!
diy hanging shower planter, bathroom ideas, container gardening, gardening
diy hanging shower planter, bathroom ideas, container gardening, gardening
diy hanging shower planter, bathroom ideas, container gardening, gardening
diy hanging shower planter, bathroom ideas, container gardening, gardening
diy hanging shower planter, bathroom ideas, container gardening, gardening
diy hanging shower planter, bathroom ideas, container gardening, gardening
MATERIALS:
• (1) 1'x1'x8' board
• Chicken wire cut to 1'x2'
• (1) Roll fiberglass screen
• Staple gun and staples
• Plants
• Small gauge chains
• Metal hooks
• Soil
TOOLS:
• Wire cutters
• Needle nose pliers
• Wood Screws
• Drill
INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Go to your local hardware store (we went to Lowes) and pick up your supplies. If you don't have a saw, ask the wood department to cut your board into 2 pieces: (2) 2' sections and (2) 1' sections
2. Layout your boards in the shape of a rectangle and pre-drill the holes so your wood won't split when you screw them together. Screw all 4 boards together.
3. Cut your chicken wire with the wire cutters to fit the rectangle and then staple around the edges so it's tightly secured. Cut off the excess chicken wire around the edges.
4. Fold over your fiberglass mesh 4x so it's thick. This will keep your soil from falling out. Staple it around the edges, right over the top of the chicken wire layer, so it's tightly secured.
5. Add your hooks to the corners of your planter. Our hooks had clamps, which made them easier to hang. Then screw your 4 regular ceiling hooks into the ceiling, after you have measured the right distance.
6. Take your plants and separate them by gently breaking apart the soil and dividing them by the root.
7. Measure out where you want each plant to go on the black mesh (this is where you will make holes for the plants). We made holes 2 inches apart using a ruler. You can use a knife to make each hole.
8. Gently feed the roots through each hole and add a layer a soil that completely covers them.
9. Moisten the soil so you can see the roots and layer with more soil. You can continue to add more soil wherever needed.
10. Hang your planter above the shower and get ready to enjoy!
diy hanging shower planter, bathroom ideas, container gardening, gardening
Peachesandsalt

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

3 of 9 questions
  • Maureen
    on Sep 12, 2017

    Would you put some landscape fabric above the root system as well? Do you trim the roots, or do you find it is not necessary?

    • Fer25945957
      on Dec 27, 2017

      Landscape fabric works just as well if not better than fiberglass and is MUCH for affordable! You will need to fold it more if you plan on using full coverage of soil. The plants used in this project - pothos - can do extremely well just in water and/or minimal amounts of soil!!
      I would suggest using Miracle Gro and using just enough to cover the roots - and feel free to trim them if you like. Leave at least 1/2-3/4". Be sure to cut with a very, very sharp knife. I use a scalpel.

      I love working with these plants and still have one from my first apartment - 26 years old!!!

  • Fer25945957
    on Dec 27, 2017

    Hi! I tried to go to your blog - BUT - I need a password!!??
    Why include the link if I (we) cannot access the site. I want to see what you have!!!! :D :D

    Also, all of your measurements (for everything) are listed as feet only never in inches. For example: your first measurements are 1 foot by 1 foot by 8 feet? Is this correct or am I reading it wrong?

  • Linda
    on May 21, 2018

    How do you water it? I have visions of dirt coming from the planter over the edges since it has no sides

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29 of 44 comments
  • Liz
    on Jan 6, 2017

    In theory, this looks attractive and workable, however, I'm personally concerned about the dirt/water environment creating mold spores. It can be especially harmful breathing mold spores in a closed in moist environment. For me, having this somewhere else would be preferable.

  • Superbee
    on Jun 1, 2017

    It's very nice but for me, it would be way more trouble than it's worth. But my crafting days are winding down......

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