Asked on May 23, 2020

Killing something that may be called bittersweet vine?

AnnieNaomie Moore aka baileyanddaisey, Castaic CAJennasdomain
+9

Answered

A nuisance vine has taken over the trunks of all my trees. Friend pulled hers lose and it caused some rash wherever it touched her skin. I'd like to kill it on the tree if possible. But don't want to kill the trees. We've heard it's called bittersweet vine and it does look like something called that from Google searching. Help?

10 answers
  • Redcatcec
    on May 23, 2020

    Hi Donna,


    From what i have read this is a highly invasive vine that can choke the life out of trees. take a look here at these links and see if you can get the help you need. Both mention glycophosphate painted onto a severed vine rather than sprayed., this would be so as to not kill your tree. Best to you:


    https://www.ecolandscaping.org/02/landscape-challenges/invasive-plants/asiatic-bittersweet-vine-an-exotic-invasive-plant-fact-sheet/


    https://www.thespruce.com/oriental-bittersweet-vines-2130878

  • The best way to get rid of it is to dig out the roots. Check with your local garden store for a herbicide that may take care of it. Gloves and long sleeves are a must!

  • Chloe Crabtree
    on May 23, 2020

    Oriental bittersweet control involves removing or killing oriental bittersweet on your property. Pull out the vines by the roots or repeatedly cut them down, keeping an eye out for suckers. You can also treat the vine with systemic herbicides recommended by your garden store.

  • Em
    on May 23, 2020

    Bittersweet vine has bright yellow berries in the fall that open into a orange/red berry inside. They are considered invasive by many, others love the fall berries. I always keep a bunch in a tall vase. They last for a few years. They make a beautiful display when on a trellis. That being said an unwanted one can be a pain. This may help.

    There are two approaches to controlling Oriental Bittersweet vines. Either manually extract the bittersweet vines and roots. Or use a chemical to eradicate the vines. The manual method can be time consuming and frustrating. Manually removing the vines can make you feel overwhelmed. And even discouraged from continuing the eradication process. However, manually removing the vines is generally more effective. This is especially true with vines above ground.

    A chemical method of using a herbicide with Triclopyr is effective but not always immediate. It may take a few weeks to see any improvement. The chemical method must be applied to the root system during the growing season of the Oriental Bittersweet. It is not effective during the dormant winter months when the root system is not growing.

  • Em
    on May 23, 2020

    There are two approaches to controlling Oriental Bittersweet vines. Either manually extract the bittersweet vines and roots. Or use a chemical to eradicate the vines. The manual method can be time consuming and frustrating. Manually removing the vines can make you feel overwhelmed. And even discouraged from continuing the eradication process. However, manually removing the vines is generally more effective. This is especially true with vines above ground.

    A chemical method of using a herbicide with Triclopyr is effective but not always immediate. It may take a few weeks to see any improvement. The chemical method must be applied to the root system during the growing season of the Oriental Bittersweet. It is not effective during the dormant winter months when the root system is not growing.

  • Jennasdomain
    on May 24, 2020

    Looks like poison ivy...“.leaves of 3 let it be”. It likes to climb on trees. With long sleeves and heavy gloves you can pull it off the tree. Round up for vines and poison ivy can be used. The bark will protect the tree.

  • Sounds like your friend might have had poison ivy and if not properly handled can cause a rash, pain, etc. If you don't know what you have, glove up, take a good snip and place in a sealed plastic bag and take toyour best local nursery for identification. Or take several close up photos and a few of the general area and email to your local County Extension Master Gardener for assistance.


    Always watch the area in the first glimpses of spring before it grows a foothold. The earlier you get to it, the easier the job will be. Remember to gear up and be safe!


    We take the natural route whenever possible. All those chemicals people use ends up in our groundwater and aquifers. Plus dangerous for children, pets and wildlife. Consider all remedies before choosing a method. Or, just hire out this year and check every week thereafter to get a handle on it should it reappear.

  • Annie
    on May 28, 2020

    Yes that is poison ivy. Be careful with that - here's a natural home made recipe that really works.

    https://countrylivinginacariboovalley.com/homemade-poison-ivy-and-weed-killer-that-really-works/

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