DIY Christmas Wrapping Paper Ideas

4 Materials
$20
10 Minutes
Easy

I am wrapping up my Christmas in July week with DIY Christmas Wrapping Paper ideas with Tombow Dual Brush Pens! See what I did there? LOL! I love creating with items that I have on hand, it is a challenging and an easy way to get the kiddos involved (or just save all the fun for yourself, I won’t tell!) I am going to create three styles of DIY Christmas Wrapping Paper with my Dual Brush Pens, so let’s get started!

Handwritten Wrapping Paper

Cut a section of butcher paper and lay it out on a flat surface. Starting in the top left corner, handwrite MERRY CHRISTMAS diagonally in alternating colors of bright red and green. My go-to Christmas colors are 847 Crimson and 245 Sap Green. They just scream Merry Christmas, don’t you think? 

Now, this is not modern calligraphy or perfect hand lettering, instead, it is simply my unrefined mix of handwriting and printing. Don’t get hung up on perfection, but rather let go and have FUN! Think up other sayings that could be placed on wrapping paper such as Seasons Greetings, Joy to the World, or Feliz Navidad. Personalize the wrapping paper with the recipient’s name or change up the colors for some Happy Chanukkah. Get the kiddos involved and just create!

Plaid Wrapping Paper

Plaid has always been the go-to for the guys in my life, and the muted palette from the Holiday 10 Pack of Dual Brush Pens is a perfect match. Cut a section of butcher paper and lay it out on a flat surface. Start off with an approximately two-inch square grid of 847 Crimson, then add a second square grid with 228 Gray Green with the side of the brush tips of the Dual Brush Pens. This creates a basic windowpane plaid. Add wide strokes of 026 Yellow Gold to the right of the Crimson and 526 True Blue to the right of the Gray Green. 

Using the bullet tip add thin lines to fill in the rest of the plaid pattern with the remaining colors 177 Dark Jade, 837 Wine Red, and 249 Hunter Green from the Dual Brush Pen Holiday 10 Pack. Now, I didn’t measure and mark my plaid pattern, I just started drawing, but you certainly could if you want to. Experiment with different colors, patterns, and line widths to create some personalized Plaid Christmas Wrapping Paper. And, remember that plaid can be applicable to many different types of special occasions such as Birthdays, Anniversaries, and even Valentine’s Day. I always wrap plaid paper on the diagonal for added interest.

Doodled Wrapping Paper


This last technique is definitely my favorite because I love to doodle! Cut a section of butcher paper and layout on a flat work surface. Holly berries and leaves are a simple, yet iconic symbol of Christmas, so start with groups of three red berries using 847 Crimson. Add pointed leaves in between the berries using 245 Sap Green. Don’t worry about being precise, keep the shapes loose, and the coloring random. Once the butcher paper is full, outline all of the holly berries and leaves with the bullet tip of the MONOTWIN Permanent Marker using flowing and sketchy lines. 


You can stop at this point, but I wanted to fill in some of the white spaces that happened in my random design. Stars were the perfect solution! Draw some random stars with Dual Brush Pen 025 Light Orange and the outline with the MONOTWIN Permanent Marker. Variations on this doodle theme are endless, think stockings, candy canes, Christmas trees, and even angels or Santa! The doodle options are only as limited as your imagination.

I recommend using Tombow Xtreme Permanent Adhesive to wrap all the presents in the custom DIY Christmas Wrapping Papers.  It is five times stronger than standard adhesive runners and provides a clean, finished package.

Resources for this project:

See all materials
Any price and availability information displayed on [relevant Amazon Site(s), as applicable] at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.
Hometalk may collect a small share of sales from the links on this page.More info

Frequently asked questions

Have a question about this project?

Comments

Join the conversation

Next