Leisa Hart
Leisa Hart
  • Hometalker
  • Silver Spring, MD

Backyard Tiki Bar

10 Materials
2 Weeks
Medium

I always wanted a place outdoors to entertain, even if it rains.
This was a BIG project for me. I had no written plan, so a LOT of this was trial an error...this is my disclaimer :-) I am NOT a PRO
BEFORE
BEFORE
A great friend, and licensed contractor, Tom Water's and his son, built this 10x40' pavilion on the back of my garage. Now all I have to do the either wait for the grass to die....OR.. Spray it
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
After spraying, I laid weed block to cover. I used 4x4's as a border. Then used a speed bore to pre-drill holes. Lastly, iron stakes to hold them in place.
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
I thought of using concrete stain on the block retaining wall. A friend suggested bamboo fencing for the wall. Two words...LESS MESS. I love it. It screams TIKI.
I ordered 4 tons of Blue Stone dust. It's very fine and feels like sand. It took me all day to wheel barrel this in from the driveway (felt like all year...think of it as exercise)
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
The stone dust provides better drainage than sand. It is self-tamping, and after a few days, it sets-up like stone. In addition, later, when I am able to lay pavers, it only takes a stiff rake to loosen it up. I can then use it to sweep between the joints of the pavers.
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
This is 3 of the pallets broken down, using a reciprocating saw. I would upload the video, but it not in the right format. You'll have to trust me that it's EASY! The other 3 pallets were left intact. They provide the framing for the bar.
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
Scrap wood is used as corner supports on the top and bottom of each corner. The bar is U-shaped with one pallet cut in half. The other two pallets are placed next to one another.
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
1x10 common boards are cut to length and used as shelving behind the bar. 2x8 Douglas Fir and 2x4 Pine is used to create the bar top. The Fir is pretty. I haven't sealed it yet but I can only imagine how pretty it'll be when I do. I used exterior screws to screw it in from underneath.
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
Here's the finished bar with some driftwood decor.
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
After existing furniture and cool decor is added, the bar is officially OPEN. I hope this inspires you. 2 intense weeks, 1 single Mom with the help of my son (16) and daughter (14), a really cool drill, a LOT of screws, and a sore back.
backyard tiki bar, diy, outdoor furniture, outdoor living
A few have asked about the roofing material and how the pavilion was constructed. Here's a view from above.
Any price and availability information displayed on [relevant Amazon Site(s), as applicable] at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.
Hometalk may collect a small share of sales from the links on this page. More info

Top Hometalk Projects

13 Spectacular Ways To Display Your House Number
22 Ideas To Make Your Terra Cotta Pots Look Oh-So-Pretty
15 Kitchen Updates Under $20
15 Genius Curtain Ideas To Instantly Upgrade Your Space
29 Of The Best DIY Mirror Projects Ever Made
15 Genius Curtain Ideas To Instantly Upgrade Your Space
14 Cool Ways To Upholster Chairs That You Can DIY
16 Creative Ways To Upcycle Pallets
21 Ways to Have More Polka Dots in Your Life
30 Brilliant Things You Can Make From Cheap Thrift Store Finds!
30 Ways To Use Old Jeans For Brilliant Craft Ideas
15 Genius Curtain Ideas To Instantly Upgrade Your Space
15 Genius Curtain Ideas To Instantly Upgrade Your Space
21 Totally Terrific Things You Can Do With Doilies
16 Ways to Showcase Your Herb Garden

Have a question about this project?

14 questions
  • Liz Straughn
    on Apr 10, 2016

    Do you have problems with rain/water on the side of the barn?

  • Jill
    on Apr 10, 2016

    I would love to know where you found the anchor?

    • Leisa Hart
      on Apr 10, 2016

      I found it in a store called Homegoods.

    • Wardo
      on May 4, 2016

      If you look close, its made of a bunch of little pieces. I'll bet a walk on the beach or in the bush for some drift wood or wind downed trees might give up enough to make one eh?

    • Gisele
      on May 21, 2016

      AC Moore has a variety of driftwood-like items.

    • Leisa Hart
      on May 31, 2016

      Jill, I have just seen the anchor in both TJ Maxx and Marshalls stores. Best of luck shopping! :)

  • Suzanna Nyquist
    on Apr 11, 2016

    a couple of questions > do u serve bloodys and will you come and help me make mine lol fantastic

    • Leisa Hart
      on Apr 11, 2016

      Oh Suzanna, thank you. If you lived closer, I sure would help. My friends would tell you, I Really mean it. LOL! On a serious note though; I do serve Bloody Mary's but I specialize in Margaritas. Cheers!

  • Pam
    on May 22, 2016

    I am as well a single mother although with slightly older children but do most of my home maintenance, home improvements, etc., myself. I am curious what the cost of blue stone dust is. I love the idea but don't know if I would be able to afford it. Thanks for sharing!!

    • Leisa Hart
      on May 31, 2016

      Hi Pam. I ordered the stone dust through a bulk mulch and stone delivery service. I gave them the dimensions of the space I was covering (14' x 27' and 3" deep). They calculated 4 tons at a total cost of $208. Far cheaper than laying pavers, but a good material to have, should I decide later to install pavers. This is because the stone dust can be loosened using a bow rake. Right now it's hard as a rock, but crumbles loose easily. Once loosened, it can be push into the joints of pavers. I hope this helps.

    • Pam
      on Jun 23, 2016

      Thank you!! For some reason I was just able to view your reply today but great to know it's affordable. I'll certainly keep it in mind.

  • Meli
    on Jun 6, 2016

    Have you already received thank you cards from all the cats in the neighbourhood? If not, how do you keep them out of this awesome litter box?

  • Bob
    on Jul 9, 2016

    mm.How much was the cost of the materials and labour for the pavilion?

    • Leisa Hart
      on Jul 10, 2016

      I recall the pavilion materials and labor costing about $4K

  • Sun9369966
    on Jul 31, 2016

    You mentioned the cost @$4000, yet you mentioned the bill of materials as some lumber and incidental. I am assuming your contractor friend built the actual overhead structure and you did the finish work. The total for the entire project was $4k? What was used for the posts supporting the roof? What if the finish of the food? Steve M Tampa, Fl

    • Leisa Hart
      on Aug 1, 2016

      Yes, the $4K was for the overhead structure. The posts are 6x6 posts. What do you mean when you type "...finish of the food"?

    • Sun9369966
      on Aug 1, 2016

      That was the damn auto correct. It is supposed to be what did you put on the roof. Shingles? Metal?

    • Leisa Hart
      on Aug 2, 2016

      LOL! I've added a photo. Yeah auto correct truly has a mind of its own. I too have fallen victim.

      , The pavilion was built on the rear of my existing garage The roof line was extended and asphalt shingles were used
    • Mike Williamson
      on Jan 28, 2018

      Very nice! Kool place to hang out!
    • Caseyem11
      on Jan 28, 2018

      Nice shady spot for the Maryland summer. Perhaps an exterior grade ceiling fan next? .
    • Leisa Hart
      on Jan 29, 2018

      Yes, indeed. I have since (fall 2017) added junction boxes for ceiling fans and additional receptacles to accommodate a TV on the wall behind the bar, and bar needs ie blender, mini fridge.
  • Klondike
    on Jan 28, 2018

    You state that you used four tons of blue stone dust. How many square feet did that cover and how deep did you make it. Hopefully I can use your numbers to figure my needs. I am pretty sure I can get a dump truck to the area and have them dump it all around and then I can simply spread it. The wheelbarrow can kill you.
    Thanks for the help.
    • Sjk29281121
      on Jan 28, 2018

      Well the area was 10' x 40' and you'd probably want 2-3" deep. I'll let you do the math, :)
    • Jim Smith
      on Jan 28, 2018

      One ton covers 100 sq/ft 2 in. deep
    • Leisa Hart
      on Jan 28, 2018

      Note that it's over a year later. The stone dust has become compacted. It's about 3"deep. I hope that this year I have the area paved. Stay tuned.
    • Sue
      on Jan 29, 2018

      1 cubic yard of material covers 162 square feet 2 inches deep, 108 sq ft 3 inches deep or 81 sq ft 4 in deep. hope that helps.
    • Aussie Girl
      on Feb 10, 2018

      We have used dolomite sand (which I think is made from bluestone, so probably the same stuff) for areas in our yard. We wanted a hard surface, but could not afford concrete or pavers. My husband used a wacker packer to compact the dolomite, and then screeded it to make it all level and even. He then sprinkled cement powder over the area and then sprinkled it with the hose to wet it through. He has also experimented with dry mixing the dolomite with the cement powder in a mixer and then leveling and screeding it which helps the cement integrate with the dolomite a lot better. He usually makes it about 4 inches thick. Once it has been thoroughly wet, it hardens to a surface as hard as concrete, but if you need to dig it up, it is very easy to break up. We have had a section of this in front of our lounge room for about 4 years, which cops all the weather and we have driven our fully laden 3 tonne truck over it time and time again and it has stood up to the test of time. The only place it has deteriorated is where the water from our downpipe flows over it, which has washed some of it out over the years. You may be able to do away with the pavers by using this method, worth a try
  • Linda
    on Jan 28, 2018

    Can I ask where the tray tables that are shown with your chairs came from?
  • Nora Lee
    on Jan 28, 2018

    good for you. That was a lot of work. What is the “cool drill“ you used?
  • Sherrie
    on Jan 29, 2018

    I have done all sorts of yard projects, but never heard of stone dust. Is it a sort of sand?
    • Leisa Hart
      on Jan 29, 2018

      it's crumbled blue stone. Typically used to sweep between pavers, and flagstone. I chose it because, at some point, I'll put down pavers. At that time, I can loosen (with a bow rake) and reuse the stone dust
  • Susan Davis
    on Jan 29, 2018

    Very nice. How did you attach the bamboo to the block wall?
    • Leisa Hart
      on Jan 29, 2018

      I used masonry nails, affixed sparingly into the mortar joints. Then the bamboo was tied using coated floral wire. I must admit. It's not holding up well. This spring, I plan to attach furring strips to the wall. Then I'll be able the bamboo to that, as the floral wire isn't sturdy enough. Stay tuned.
    • JQ
      on Feb 3, 2018

      Leisa, If there's wood behind the bamboo, what about big staples to hold it up? If it's cement maybe attach a wood border with the masonry nails all around the cement area and then attach with big staples to the border? I don't know the materials you have but I thought I could throw out a couple (maybe workable) ideas. I'm in no way a builder, lol, but I love what you've created.
  • Kat
    on Jan 29, 2018

    How much sand did you buy and how much was the cost? Your project turned out beautiful. I want to give this a try.
    • Leisa Hart
      on Jan 29, 2018

      4 tons of blue stone dust, because It provides better drainage. I purchased it in bulk and had it delivered. It cost less than $200
  • Kat
    on Jan 29, 2018

    How much sand did this take and what was the cost of the sand? Congratulations. You did a beautiful job.
    • Leisa Hart
      on Jan 29, 2018

      4 tons of blue stone dust, because It provides better drainage. I purchased it in bulk and had it delivered. It cost less than $200

Join the conversation

2 of 184 comments
  • Yvonne Larr
    on Aug 8, 2018

    That looks fantastic!! I am in the process of transitioning/downsizing from urban to country living and always looking for ideas to create outdoor living spaces-yours is amazing-and the multi-use sand was brilliant!

  • Deborah Perrin
    on May 21, 2019

    Looks great! I've been looking for ideas for my breezeway that was built 5 years ago - it somehow got turned into the storage area - and we never finished it off. So stealing several of these ideas!

Your comment...