Easy Upcycled Sweatshirt Pillow Stuffed With Poly-Fil®

6 Materials
$10
1 Hour
Easy

I love crafting everyday items into keepsakes for family and friends. Those projects made with love are extra special gifts. This Easy Upcycled Sweatshirt Pillow Stuffed with Poly-Fil® started out as a Birthday present bought in the wrong size that couldn’t be returned. My nephew was totally bummed when he tried to try it on and it was too small. I immediately thought I could turn it into a pillow!

Spend some time with the kiddos and create a keepsake from a sweatshirt or hoodie.

To begin the Easy Upcycled Sweatshirt Pillow, gather all supplies. Decide how much of the sweatshirt you want to be a pillow. Jonathan wanted to keep the pocket part of the hoodie but didn’t want the hood or sleeves.

Turn the sweatshirt inside out and on a flat surface, measure out a rectangle, and mark with a chalk pencil.

Cut out the sweatshirt rectangles along the marked lines with fabric scissors. These Fiskars Amplify Mixed Media Shears are perfect for heavy and bulky fabrics.

Secure the three cut sides with straight pins, leaving the bottom cuffed edge open. I love these extra long straight pins with colored heads.

Sew the cut edges on a sewing machine with matching colored thread, remembering to backstitch at the beginning and end. I also like to backstitch the corners.

Trim threads, remove straight pins and turn the sweatshirt pillow right side out. Stuff with Poly-Fil® from Fairfield World™. I recently discovered pre-threaded bobbins and I have to say my life is changed forever!

Stuff pillow firmly with Poly-Fil® from Fairfield World™ making sure to get into the corners.

Push Poly-Fil® from Fairfield World™ stuffing down into the pillow and secure bottom cuff edge with straight pins. Sew the bottom edge of the pillow closed with a sewing machine, remembering to backstitch at the beginning and end. Remove straight pins and fluff stuffing back into all areas of the sweatshirt pillow.

I hope you have enjoyed my Easy Upcycled Sweatshirt Pillow and that you will use my tutorial as a jumping-off point to showcase YOUR Fairfield World creativity! With a wide variety of stuffing, pellets, weighted blankets, pillow forms, quilt batting and more the makers of Poly-Fil have you covered for all of your crafting needs! For a TON of inspiration, check out the Fairfield Instagram account and Facebook page.

This Easy Upcycled Sweatshirt Pillow is a perfect beginner sewing project to complete with tweens and teens. Poly-Fil® from Fairfield World™ is the perfect stuffing for all your upcycled and recycled projects! Features 100% premium polyester fiber, superior resiliency, and smooth consistency. It is made from 100% recycled polyester fiber, washable, and non-allergenic. Plus Poly-Fil® is proudly made in the USA, and unconditionally guaranteed.


Creatively, Beth

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Have a question about this project?

1 question
  • Sjt29229935
    Sjt29229935
    6 days ago

    This may seem like a really stupid question and I feel like the dumbest rock in the box, but how do you sew your last closing seam? It looks like you have a trick to hiding those ugly, completion stitches. I hate that final bit of seam because it always shows and detracts from the rest of the smooth lines. i try to be real sneaky and hand stitch under the edges to hide the thread. Like a surgeon does to keep from leaving railroad track puncture dots and a ridge. Or in upholstering when using a curved needle under the material. Quite frankly, it's a pain. I sew on the wrong side as far as possible before turning so the seams are all neat and stitching stays on the inside. The way you have the pins in the material it doesn't look like you simply stitched on the outside (right side of material) being left with that ugly ridge. Do you have a secret you could share? i would LOVE to learn it! Thank you. Your pillows are adorable and what a lovely way to give extra life to a cherished garment.

    • Sjt29229935
      Sjt29229935
      6 days ago

      Thanks, Ann, that's my usual modus operandi. However, Beth. I read both this article and your blog and still am scratching my head about the final picture with the pins. On your blog they were still in place when you were sewing the final edge. So guess you simply sewed on the outside of the pillow to close the entire last seam. Thank you and sorry I am so dense,. Guess I will continue to use the method I have always used similar to Ann's comments. Have a beautiful, sunny spring everyone!


Join the conversation

6 of 15 comments
  • Jill Krol
    Jill Krol
    6 days ago

    I've made many a pillow, but I always make a liner first. What I mean is, I take anything I have such as a worn out pillow case or sheet and I make a pillow form the size of the finished pillow. I stuff that and then I make the outside finished product, but start with a zippered side. On the finished product, I sew a couple of inches on each end of one side and put in the zipper (make sure to open the zipper a bit once it is in and before the next step). Then I sew the other 3 sides, turn it right side out (through the open zipper!). Put in the pillow into the final cover. You can now wash the cover when needed!

  • Dl.5660408
    Dl.5660408
    6 days ago

    What a great idea! Especially if it was a beloved sweatshirt

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