Asked on Jul 28, 2015

Is this house worth my time and money?

NormskiCeeNorma Shumate
+675

Answered

A good ex-neighbor of mine has just offered me this small, 1 bath, 1 bed, home, with a medium backyard, and small metal shed for 15 grand for full ownership. The last renter of his really abused the house, and caused so much trouble for him he had to have her forcibly removed from the premises, and its sat there ever since. He's old and tired of having this and knew I was young and looking so he made the offer at a seemingly low offer; BUT, It definitely needs a lot of work on the outside that I can see. I'm young and know close to nothing about home repair, so I need some intelligent people for help on this. I'm committed and ready to work, I just need guidance or advice. Should I take the deal...or leave this potential bomb-shell for someone else? Thank you so much for your time, and answers!
This is the house from the front. Dilapidated, chipping paint, snapped off porch light.
This is basically every window sill on the outside of the house. There was wood there at one point, but no longer.
Outer boards of some windows are rotted out as well. Can see bugs crawling in and out.
Gutters all around the house are fallen, or simply missing. This one should be easy enough to fix?
As before there is no gutter directing the water into the ground, so water just flows down the house, causing more damage to the boards and moss growth.
Bottom board missing, and an exposed pipe of some kind.
A lot of foundation cracks and slidings like this one. This is the least damaging of them all, the entire corner of the other side has shifted.
The outer boards of this house are so damaged they fall apart like paper Mache.
Side of house. Patio is unusable as the boards out there are like the ones of the side of the house...pure fiber. The stairs have long since fallen.
No visible stains on the ceilings at all, but definite damage as their dropping in places.
The kitchen looks very nice and visibly "fresh" from the rest of the house.
Half-finished projects? This room doesn't even have a wall. Easy enough to hang drywall though.
Stained walls (from water)? Non-sealing windows.
The ceiling in the bathroom has completely collapsed! What is this? Is this serious or an easy fix?
250 of 591 answers
  • Donna
    on Dec 19, 2016

    This house is adorable! Show it some love...the neighbors will love you forever!
  • Ocallah28443
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I just finished and moved into my old- new mobile home (1980's) and was used as a rental. It took three months and much directing home repairers when to do their thing! I had to squash arguments from vendors but the results are stupendous. But I might add, the basic part of my mobile home was good and I mostly did remodeling and making it into the 21st century. It is just hard but in my case it was worth it! I might add, I am a 76 year old and think this to be my last home until something else happens????
  • Debbie
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I see a LOT of damage costing LOTS of money, work and time - it likely forebodes even more of same in what is unseen, especially when you see water damage, wood rot and possibly a crack in the foundation. As several have said, even when complete you only have a 1 bedroom, 1 bath. RUN!!!!
  • Donna Simon
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Find out what the property is worth less tear down of the old home. Then purchase a used mobile home . There out there cheap. Then sell it or rent.
  • Cindy Hagemann
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Go to the city or county and find out what the appraisal is and taxes. Pay to have it inspected by a professional to find out exactly what you are dealing with (it will cost $200 - $500 depending on where you live). If you are handy - do it if the appraisal, taxes and inspection pan out. If you are not handy, you will have lots of money to spend on repairs with a professional - which could be a lot of money. Good luck.
  • Ael9908822
    on Dec 19, 2016

    It;s so nice. I would buy it and fix it up.
  • Cathy
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Hire a home inspector he will give you good advise to make your decision
  • Karen
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Have a home inspector check it out, so you'll know what all needs to be done and have a contractor give you an estimate on repairs and you'll know approximately how much it will cost you.
  • Mickey Hogan Jeneski
    on Dec 19, 2016

    First major things to check for: asbestos, electric, plumbing and termites. Any of these problems can end up costing big.

  • AneRyan
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I agree you need an inspection before you decide. If the bones are good and can be salvaged , the you should. Old homes are often a goldmine for creativity. What a bargain in any case.
  • Gary Yarbrough
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Find out what it costs to tear down and haul to the dump-it may be more than
    The price of the lot
    gary Chattanooga Tn


  • Joyce Fries-Brune
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Check for cracks in the foundation walls. Make sure your water pressure is good. Any trouble flushing may indicate sewer issues. Do the lights dim when something requiring power is plugged in? Are there large cracks inside at the corners of the windows and doors? These issues are indications of COSTLY repairs.
  • Sue Kiene
    on Dec 19, 2016

    As a Realtor, with the amount of work that I see just from the few pictures that you have provided and you did not show electrical boxes or furnace or plumbing etc., no you do not want to purchase it. As a one bedroom home, no matter how much money, time and effort that you put in it, the price will only go so high. If it will cost you $30000 (time, labor, materials, and some things you do need a contractor for, etc.) added to your $15000 base, is it worth $45000. What can you purchase for $45000 in that location. Regarding the people that are telling you to purchase a modular home and put on it, there are laws regarding whether one can be put on it and each location has different rules and to what codes must be met for the home to go on a lot. Even if a used mobile/modular home can be put on it, there is the cost of foundation as well as all hook ups and the moving of the trailer and setup costs. Is this a well and septic location? Are they to code? What repairs are needed in the used manufactured/modular home? What damage could be done moving it that will need to be repaired? Tearing the house also has costs and permits and regulations etc. to be adhered to. What is a vacant lot worth in that location. And by the way, the last tenant did not do all that damage. That house has been neglected for a long time with all the rot on the windows etc.
    • Margie Hood
      on Jun 8, 2019

      You are right about permits and what is allowed...My neighborhood is on a dirt road and is all country but there are no mobile homes allowed here....I think it can bring down property value too

  • Norma Centner
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would have it inspected like everyone is suggesting. If you have to tire it down you still have the land (don't know how much comes with it). Build a home of your own there.

  • Ruth Mitchell Purvis
    on Dec 19, 2016

    If he was giving it to you I would say yes but for 15 grand??? NO. Mold, termites, and heaven know what else. Good luck.

  • Linda
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Others are correct to order a home inspection before buying . Calculate your budget, check other sales in the area, tax $ appraisal and then, if ready for hard work, save this house and enjoy your hard work. You can always do the labor work(saving money) and learn how to do simple tasks. If you love the neighborhood, good luck.
  • Ase8274026
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Location, location, location! Then inspection!!! If the property doesn't pass inspection but the location is prime buy it anyway and you've got yourself a great piece of potential future to work with.
  • Joan Abbott
    on Dec 19, 2016

    WALK AWAY FAST AND DON'T LOOK BACK. THE HOUSE IS NOT WORTH IT AND THERE ISN'T ENOUGH LAND TO JUSTIFY THE COST.
  • Kel12915509
    on Dec 19, 2016

    You can't buy a lot for $15K, so, yes, that's a great deal. First find out if you qualify for a bank loan to tear down the structure and rebuild a small house on the lot. If you do, go for it. However, having gone through two house constructions myself, I'm telling you that house is not a candidate for renovation. That's a tear down.
  • Deanna Nassar
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I can see what looks like major wood rot on outside. If termites haven't already moved in they will. Inside some of the pictures show what may indicate roof leaks. To even consider you would need someone to inspect for termites, and structural soundness. Not cheap. My Mother took over a repo VA home with lot of damage and made it work. New door, lot of paint, replaced bath floor and redid kitchen floor. Honestly my gut feeling is let it go.
  • Cathy C
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would think it depends on how much work you plan to do yourself and how much would be hired out. Without knowing the condition of the electric and plumbing as well as the heating system, I see the need for replacement windows and the siding repaired, scraped and painted. If the bones of the house are sound, foundation and framing and the roof isn't bad then it could be a nice little house when fixed up! I would check for termites and other rot but if you have the know how or the ambition to learn how to do things yourself, you can cut a lot of costs by doing it yourself.
  • MaryAnn
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Am working on a similar one myself! I love old houses and don't begrudge the work. My skill level is same as yours but find the guys in Home Depot and roof supply plumbing supply, etc. great when they find out I'm tackling the job myself (an older woman) I get all the help I need!!
  • Lad9607515
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Go for it. I'm a woman and have purchased houses like this and turned them around. Yes get the inspections. But 15,000 unless inner-city. Worth it.
  • Wyldecent
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I've been there with my $1 house that turned out to be a money pit. The money I've spent on it, which was solely repairs to bring it up to code, simple improvements and adding a very small second bathroom which was needed, is more than it is valued at with the decline of my neighborhood. Had I known what I know now, I would have razed it and put up modular home as was suggested by another reader. It would have been cheaper and I wouldn't have had to live with years of remodeling, much of which I had to do myself to save money (learned how to do a lot of things the hard way). Just from the picture, I can see dry rot and what looks to be a crack in the foundation to the left of the door. You will need to replace at least one of the windows. The gutter is down on one side which could suggest roof issues. None of this will be cheap to fix, and as you state you are a novice, you will need to hire someone rather than do it yourself. This adds to the costs. At the very least, have a home inspection first and do a search for the costs of the repairs in your area. It may cost more to repair it than to replace it.
  • Helen Dore
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Oh Lord, is this on a big lot? If so buy it and burn the house down!
    Start from scratch! That old house needs new foundation, new walls, doors Windows, plumbing and electricity. Don't even spend a cent on home inspection!

  • Margarita
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Get an inspection first to determine what needs to be fixed and how much it will cost. To me, this looks like a complete tear down. In the end, it may be cheaper to replace rather than repair. Perhaps put a modular home in its place?
  • Lno13886593
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Good advice from many. Once you know the cost of (1) repairs (from inspection + contractor estimates), (2) tear down and haul-away (again, from contractor estimates, which should include cost of permits), (3) potential resale value of repaired house (from recent nearby sales of comparable size), and (4) sale of vacant lot (again, from recent sales of same), you will be in a position to make an informed decision. Your only real cost in gathering this information will be from the formal inspection - and that will be worth every penny to fully understand the degree of expensive repairs (structural, electrical, etc.) vs. cosmetic repairs (things you may likely be able to handle yourself). Decent contractors should be willing to provide free estimates (get three, if you can), and the other pieces of information you can obtain yourself (from Realtor.com, Zillow.com, and/or any friendly real estate agent.) And, depending on the results of your information gathering and analysis, you can always go back to the seller and negotiate the purchase price. Good luck!
  • Helen
    on Dec 19, 2016

    In my humble opinion, it's a tear down. I agree with kellereleanor and a couple of others. Do your homework!!!
  • Kathleen Mckirkle
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Knowing what you do now from the sensible answers you got here, maybe you could ask if he would accept $10,000 which is still a fair bit of money, but would give you a head start on the money you need to do whatever you want to do.
  • Nancy Colas
    on Dec 19, 2016

    If they want to give it to you for 4 or 5 thousand, maybe? But it has a lot of work that is needed. The house is not that sturdy looking. However, if your heart says yes, take a chance. Only you know what your strengths and potential are. Good Luck!!!
  • Gail
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Location is the issue. Depends on what you can rent it for, if you want to live in that location yourself and how much the teardown would cost. I could not see inside pictures, but I am a woman and remodeled and flipped a lot. If the EMPTY lot is not worth the $15,000 plus the cost of teardown, as several have said, RUN AWAY! but again Location is the issue. Some places can bring 100,000 or more for the empty lot, some you can't sell the lot for 5,000. Use your head.
  • RuthF
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Definately get a home inspection to find out what's wrong that you can't see. (What you see is bad enough!) For example, our house had 60 amp electric with some bare wires at the box. The previous owner never had a problem with the code enforcer, but guess who had to bring that up to code? Yep, us! Same with the plumbing. Neither of these are cheap, nor are they do-it-yourself jobs. So that's the kind of stuff you want to know about before you take possession--what will the authorities in your area demand you fix?

    Are you tied to municipal water, or is this on a septic system? If it's septic, it could be on it's last legs...or they town could make you tie into the municipal system at your expense.

    Get all the info you can up front, then have the repair folks give you some estimates. (Good electricians and plumbers aren't easy to schedule; usually they have more work than they can handle, so keep that in mind, too).

    Whether it's a good offer or not also depends on how much land is involved, whether housing prices are stable or increasing, and what the comparables are today--which is where a realtor might be able to give you some help. Frankly, if the owner let the condition get this bad in the first place, you have to figure he didn't put any money into it over the years. (I don't care how bad a tenant is, cracked foundations and wood rot is on the owner. So that tells you something right there). If he really wants to dump it, and you can show him how much it will cost to bring the place up to code, you might be able to slash the price by thousands.

    But whatever you decide, don't be in a hurry. This house isn't going anywhere. Look at it from every angle, run the numbers and if they're not in your favor, walk away.
  • Donna
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I agree with Nancy 4 or 5 thousand, way to much structural damage from what I see. Where is this located? Since I saw plumbing on the outside of the building. Would you be able to live there while doing the repairs? Would save what you are now paying for rent/mortgage towards some of the repairs.
  • Nve2737038
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Having done my share of rehabbing homes I can tell you it will be more work and more money than you think it will be. If you haven't done any before THIS is not the one to start with! If you don't have at least 30grand in the bank to use repairing this one for resale don't even be tempted to tackle it. If you have to borrow money from other people to repair it then don't do it since you don't know how long and how much money it will be. There is a lot of great answers here and I hope you listen to them before going one step forward. Do your homework on all the pros and cons.
  • Steve Woodward
    on Dec 19, 2016

    The key to fixer uppers is the amount of sweat equity you can put in. First know the real value and the value of a comparable with the repairs done and up to local code for at least a renter. That difference in value is key!
    Remodeling and decorating should not be a huge factor, clean and repairs is where all the real value lies, the rest is based on if you live in it, then make it to your tastes, flipping is not just fancy rooms it is making the home safe, livable and inviting. There are just too many factors with out knowing the area values to say if it is worth buying.
    Look at your own finances and ask is renting comparable? if renting is much cheaper, then it has to be a real desire to own. Owning is costlier then just the purchase and repairs, homes need constant upkeep as is evident in the photo.
    I have flipped, remodeled and taken on huge renovations, where I live is where I spent the most, my flips with me JUST doing the repairs, a few cosmetic touch ups and selling gained me the most return on investment. I could never in this market recoup the money we have in our home. But I do not have to or want to sell so that money sunk into it is worth it to me.
  • V0910189728
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I think its worth having just for the land. I'd tear it down and put in a modular.
  • Susan
    on Dec 19, 2016

    First Get It Inspected And Get A Rough Idea What It Would Cost To Do The Repairs, But Remember Always Figure In Extra Money For Hidden Surprises That The Inspector May Have Missed. It Looks Like Based On The Photos; Depending On The Age Of The Place: It Might Have Single Paned Windows, Replace, It Has A Lot Of Wood Rot Or Damage From Termites So You Will Need To Replace A Lot Of The Wood Trim. As For The Interior; It Looks Like There Was A Bit Of Water Damage So That Will Need To Check Out Behind The Walls For Any Mold And/or Water Damage. If It Is An Older Home It Might Have Either Asbestos And/or Lead Base Paint And If There Is Water Damage There Might Be Mold. Now If Any Of The Three Are There They Will Need To Be Professionally Removed. Also If You Decide You Want the Land But Not The Building Just Remember If It Does Have Lead Based Paint It Can Not Just Be Burned Down. It Will Need To Be Torn Down. But In My Opinion, Based On The Photos; If You Want The Land & Are Trying To Decide Weather Or Not To Invest Money In The Repair Of It, I Wouldn't Bother Trying To Repair It. Just Tear It Down And Put In A Simple Trailer Or Build A Small House. But Then Again You Might Want To Save The Headaches And Just Pass This One Up. But That Is Just My Opinion.
  • Vickie
    on Dec 19, 2016

    yuk....I agree tearer downer....mow it over...salvage anything reusable...otherwise..get it down to the basement...see what is good about the basement and then start building up from there....
  • Betanner
    on Dec 19, 2016

    All of the above is good advice. Also, look up the taxes on it. Most cities and towns now have the information on line. It will tell you what the County values it at and the history of ownership. Include the taxes and Insurance in your figures.
  • 861650
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I agree with Ruth. First and foremost, have the home inspected! You can't negotiate with your hat in your hand!
  • LibraryKAT
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I wouldn't do it, especially for a first timer. It will essentially need to be gutted inside and out. Even with your labor, you are talking thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours of work. I'd let it go and find another property to purchase. I have a friend whose father left his home in this shape; their buyer pulled it down to do a new build.
    • Rose Broadway
      on Dec 19, 2016

      I agree. Been there, done that. Not worth it. See how much the location is worth, it may be valuable land that you could sell or build on.
  • Vbu4870730
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Have done remodels and built homes. offer ten thousand dollars as there is no doubt in our minds you will need home re wired and probably all new plumbing. A general home inspector is not what you need for help. You need actual electrical, plumbing and structural inspector. General home inspector can not give in depth inspection in these areas. You also need home inspected for termites Even if you tore home down lot should be worth ten thousand dollars
  • Beatrice Tangeman
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I hope you bought it, the lot alone is probably worth more.
  • Jackie Gulick-Dunn
    on Dec 19, 2016

    First and foremost, is it in a location that you will enjoy? Location is the most important thing about buying your home. Is it in a blighted area or an area that will increase in value? And second advice, I agree that it's going to be Way more work than you think it will be. I would approach very cautiously.
  • Pvj14882359
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Yes The land has value and you have a house that you can learn on and rent for money If lucky you may find someone that knows what they are doing to live there and help you plus pay you so you can put the money back into the house does it have a well and septic system and what is the condition this is important
  • Pvj14882359
    on Dec 19, 2016

    ps if you have a friend that knows what they are doing ask them to help you look the house over
  • Ginger Taylor
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Find out what the land is worth without it it may be worth bulldozing down and selling land without it
  • Sara Gooden
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Yes I would do a flip if it were mine . There is always someone looking for a smaller house to live in .
    • Janet
      on Dec 19, 2016

      I have a 110 year old, one bedroom house. The land is the value as it it is in a sought after area. I did major renos a few years ago with the hopes that this is my final retirement home. It is definitely s good look to see what the land is worth.
  • Puppymom
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would have a real estate agent and a contractor look at it and give you their opinion to base your decision on what to do?
  • She15067125
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Having fixed an old house in much better condition, I recommend buying ONLY if the land is worth the asking price. Remember you are buying a lot which requires work--demolishing this old house. Without an inspection you can see dry rot. It probably has need of everything--I mean everything. Siding, insulation, maybe 2 X 4's, plumbing, wiring, and is the foundation viable? What would a completly refurbished one bath one bedroom home be worth?

    We are two years plus into an old farmhouse remodel (2 bedrooms and 2 baths). We discovered bug nests inside the wall and once you took off the interior you could look to the outside of the house. We have spend countless hours and more than $ 50,000 thus far. The house we are doing has sentimental value. We don't have the kitchen or the master bath done yet. The trim work etc. is waiting too. We hope to add a garage and bump out the living room. It will be worth it but the location and whatnot is prime. Add the sentimental value and it is priceless to us.
    • Judy
      on Dec 19, 2016

      I agree with Shela. What is the electric like, the plumbing. The most valuable thing is probably the land and where is the land located. Location has much to do with it. Best of luck to you.
  • Sally-Charles Evans
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I noticed a crack in the foundation.....always a problem.....I think I would respectively pass on this one, unless you were going to raze it and sell the property.
  • Jan Thomas
    on Dec 19, 2016

    If the location is good, buy it. Then donate any reusable items such as cabinets, appliances, etc. to Homes for Humanity and bulldoze the house. Build a new one. The overall investment would probably be less than trying to remodel one with so much damage.


  • Pri11383256
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I think I would take my time, I dont know your age, but If it werr me I think I would go for it. It looks like it would make a cute little place. Good Luck!!
  • Paulette
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I hate to say it but it is a tear down. You will have to rip off the exterior siding. The dry rot and possible bugs make it too much of a risk to repair. There are disposal costs. Strip the inside of everything possible, put it in storage and get barebones modular. That is if the foundation is in good shape. The slope will make yard care more challenging, but a young guy could do it. The land is worth it, but I don't know the tax base there. Check out land prices nearby. Some places with utilities and sewers are 30 k and up. And yes, location is so important. You have to be happy with the area. Home ownership does tie you to one place. If you get transferred or have to move before you get it done, you may find it a hard sell. Only you know. Good luck.
    • Susan
      on Dec 19, 2016

      AGREE! If the land is worth it - sure... but it is DEFINITELY a tear down. I've been working on the interior finish of my "pole barn" home and believe me - the money goes FAST and the time it takes... too long! Then if you do something incorrectly... it's a do over and that's just more money and time. Especially if you're living in it while improving/fixing it.
      PASS on this one. Learn some remodeling skills - then maybe try it out on a smaller investment...? GOOD LUCK either way!
  • Bunny Harrison
    on Dec 19, 2016

    It looks pretty far gone -- foundation, leaning, may have asbestos paint, etc. As others have said location is first, and value of land. Good luck. I wouldn't pay more than the land is worth -- for instance, if the cleared lot is worth 10K, and then, there's the expense of demo. Go cautiously. Perhaps a contractor and realtor can give you good data.

  • Joye R. Foster
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Hire a home inspector or find a contractor with experience in restoration to get their thoughts. Then realistically look at your budget and see what you can afford in repairs. Since you have little experience with this type of project, realize you will be in for years of work and a lot of frustration if you attempt to move in and try to do the repairs. Be realistic.

    Best of luck.
  • Martha Anne Horning
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Having just finished a total gut remodel on a 2 bedroom (formerly 3), be prepared to spend close to $50,000 to complete it. We did not have siding to deal with, it is brick, but rewired, eliminated a wall, roof, gutters, windows, trim, all maintenance free, new kitchen, relocated bathroom, created walk-in closet for master bedroom from previous bathroom, etc. You need to be sure the property will be worth what you are putting into it. A one bedroom home is a tough sell in many markets.
  • Drgoodie
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would not buy this. Wood rot, termites, mold, water damage, roof replacement, out of code electrical and plumbing, appliance repair or replacement - possibly some not so obvious problems such as soil erosion, tree disease treatment or removal. Cramped space - 1 bedroom 1 bath will not keep you happy for very long. Converting to a rental eventually could bring on more tenant problems and damage. I'm usually not such a pessimistic nay-sayer, but I have had five properties in good condition over the years, with tenants good and bad but always more careless than I wished. I am so happy to be rid of all of them. I am thinking the land value is not significant or the owner would be selling the property at a higher price. Maybe someone can offer the optimistic "pro" list.
  • Marcia Richards
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Looks to me like it needs a whole lot of work. We have a 110 year old house and had no experience when we moved in, but the house was in better shape than the one pictured. It needs a roof, some window frames for sure, and possibly way more than that. Stuff is EXPENSIVE--we paid about $15,500 to re-roof the house and barn about 20 years ago and it's about at the point of needing it done again. Our storm doors cost $400 EACH, and we needed 3. Storm/screen windows were made to order sizes, and we probably should have replaced all the windows at the same time but we couldn't afford it then. I am leaning with the others who suggest a tear down if the land is worth the cost--or skipping it entirely if not. The work is not so hard that you can't learn to do it, but it takes every weekend for the next 20-30 years, and some things DO require an expert. Do not rent a large floor sander, for instance--requires some skill to use and you can sand too much in one spot in seconds!! We could still find work to do on ours and we've been here 38 years now. It's very livable and we got a good original price on it, but we've put in an awful lot of sweat and cash to get it that way.
  • Jody Price
    on Dec 19, 2016

    If it's in a great location, ABSOLUTELY!
  • Tina Gallagher
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I'll weigh in like everyone else, but with a difference. Land today is worth buying. I'd speak to a trusted contractor and a building inspector to see if the structure can be saved. Next, if it can be, I'd make a plan and begin working at my level of knowledge, which includes getting all the necessary permits for building a retaining wall on the property. Lead paint removal requires a kit and is a DIY in most areas; check in yours first. If it can't be saved and I like the floor plan, get an architect in and have plans drawn up for a new one. I like the look of this little cottage- it can either be upgraded or if having to build new, built with modern day living and wiring installed. If after all the work, you don't want it, you could make a profit or gain rental income from it. The decision is entirely yours- but I'd definitely jump on the investment.
  • Vik
    on Dec 19, 2016

    No, don't buy it unless the lot has good value. This is either a tear down or only for someone quite experienced. But have you thought about offering half of what he's asking?
    • Jolynngates
      on Dec 19, 2016

      Yes - offer the value of the land, less the cost of demolishing the house, because the house looks like a loss. Keep the land and build when you can afford to.
  • Cathy Ashworth
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I strongly agree with the concerns pointed out by Drgoodie. Also have rented property and people do not care about what is not theirs.
  • Rose Kathrein
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Tear it down, start over. The land is definitely worth the 15,000 but the other problems are not!
  • Jkendall
    on Dec 19, 2016

    As others have stated....Land, location, taxes are key issues. I don't think this is a home for a first time home buyer, to tackle fixer upper style. If foundation is sound, use it for modular, if your neighborhood allows? This will also cost more though because it's a custom build to the foundation.
  • Diane Johnson
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Run as fast as you can from this. Land may be worth something, but removal of the old house is not cheap. Sometimes, landfills are picky and expensive. I've sold real estate for 36 years!

  • Dennis
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Many counties/municipalities appraise property and dwellings separately. Perhaps you can get a realistic assessment of the property value online. i would not attempt to rehab the existing building - limited demand for one bedroom - one bath homes. Plan to spend about $5000 - $10000 tearing it down and another $140-150 per square foot for another house, plus $10-15000 for foundation work. You will likely have $100,000. Into the project in addition to the cost of the land - more if you are a beginner. Might be some salvageable materials. Some cities will tear down and haul away debris for free. Might be worth it if you can get the proper for 50% of appraised value, have it torn down, and then sell it to a builder for a small profit. Good luck.
  • Mandy Brown
    on Dec 19, 2016

    You really need to weigh the cost of the potential repairs to the what the final worth will be. Is the home In a desirable location? How much property comes with it? Are there any easements crossing the property that would prohibit you from adding onto the main structure in the future? What is the zoning in the area? Also consider if this is someplace you want to spend many years in or just a place to flip and sell. If you decide to renovate be aware of materials you put into it. If the area the house is in is mostly rural, you may not want to put high-end materials in because you won't get a return on you're investment. Don't put marble floors in the bathroom if comps in the area all have linoleum. That doesn't mean you shouldn't use a nice porcelain tile. I did notice in the one picture (showing the unfinished wall with insulation) that either that door was added later or whomever did the construction didn't install the header above the door correctly. It also looks as though the ceiling in the adjacent room is lower. Those tiles may need to be tested for asbestos as well. A lot of the outside damage looks like water and dry rot. You may want to check around the foundation to make sure there isn't any standing water in the crawl space or basement when it rains. Landscaping and sloping the ground away from the house will help with that.
  • Hackiem
    on Dec 19, 2016

    It would be a dream for me, have the time and know how. not so on energy thou. This would be worth the price asked for the land. at worse tare it down and build a Tiny House on the land.
  • Connie
    on Dec 19, 2016

    The house is a tear down. Wish you would have shown more of the lot but from what I see in the 1st picture it has a large slope to it---more money to make level and sell-able. Most likely there is lead paint ect in and on the house ---more money. offer 9000.00 and you would be better off.
  • Thomas Bales
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Daniel, From the photos you've provided, the house is obviously too far gone. However it seems the kitchen has some salvageable cabinets and perhaps some wood ceiling boards, I can't tell if you might have other things that could be salvaged. From my own experience in home remodeling /construction, there are building permits and codes to adhere to. I could list 15 cons and 1 or 2 pro's for purchasing this property. If you are really interested in this property, I would recommend that you offer the seller the land value at the most. Tear down is going to cost. If you are looking to remodel and this would a DIY project, I would consider adding on a bedroom if the property will accommodate it. Find a contractor that could help with projected cost. God Bless and Good luck. Thomas Bales



  • Mary
    on Dec 19, 2016

    May be worth the cost of a home inspection to get an idea of costs to renovate. And by the way, if the. If the mechanicals like heat are not working, you will not get a loan to fix it. Compare to other similar homes in the area with the same land to get an idea of what it is worth. You could possibly buy and then turn around and sell for a profit to a contractor. Does the work, etc... Right now you do not have enough information.
  • Vickie
    on Dec 19, 2016

    dependent on location -the land is valuable and the $15k is a great price --again dependent on location -- but the house itself needs more than just fixing up -- tear down and re-build AGAIN dependent on location and land values

  • Lucy Marie Bernier
    on Dec 19, 2016

    It's cute, you have to look @ it of what it will be ! Get an inspector to look it over. The work needed might deduct from the price of the home? If your single and your first home, think of the potential . Windows can be bought @ Habitat for Humanity. Check in the surrounding area for who likes to restore homes and get involved with them to help. Labor will be low b/c your involved. Check the pipes and electrical , you know there going to be up to code. I also kinda agree with Vickie. The look of the home has possibilities.
    • Jenny
      on Dec 19, 2016

      A structural engineer is needed. For around $500. But that will let you know from the foundation to the roof. Everything else is cosmetic.
  • Cathy
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I agree with all the above, looks like a money pit, say no thankyou!
  • Bbunny42
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Due to your lack of knowledge in all the areas you need to know in order to do just general repairs to say nothing of a total rehab, I suggest passing on this "opportunity". Other comments have some valid points, but you need to know a little something (or have someone to meet with you and any inspectors, etc.). This house has foundation problems -- sinks on the right end and/or rises on the left -- and those will be very expensive to fix. Also, if it has a septic system, no doubt it will need to be replaced. Mine had to be replaced with a $6,000 aerobic system (for which I only paid $2k; Seller paid the rest - bank would not issue mortgage until it was replaced); they now are going for about $10k I am told. Wait until you have more home owner/renter experience before you tackle a rehab project. Good luck!
  • I would have purchased this in a hot minute. The land alone is worth more than the house. Besides who says it has to stay a one bed / one bath house? Where I live the land alone would go for $300,000 +. If you read through all the reviews, it appears they demolished it and placed a doublewide on the lot. Also a viable use and what suited the new owner. Too bad I wasn't there to dumpster dive for the old wood!
    • Did you read through all 400+ entries? The gentleman that bought this house ended up tearing it all down. Many people advised passing up this opportunity. I am glad he was smart enough to buy it and then rehab it to his liking. How often does one get to buy a piece of property for $15,000? Not often.
  • Karen Rae Lvine
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I have an old house. Every wall we open is a proverbial can of worms. If you're not a fixer-upper, professional help is expensive. I know you have a vision, which is romantic at the start. At least hire a reputable inspector before you buy. I does look like a tear-down to me. You don't need to learn much to demo it. If you do, make sure you get a big enough dumpster! If the land is worth at least double, it might be a good investment. Good luck!
  • Cathy carter
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Being a purchaser of a foreclosed home, I know you will see some challenges in re-doing this home. It will cost to replace all the wood that has rotted around it, not to mention termites. If you can get the windows replaced with metal trim that would be great. Also you can redo the ceilings and floors by yourself. I used 3/4" plywood, treated, for the floors and 5/8" wall board (can't think of the name) for the ceilings. We had an independent contractor replace the roof. Yes it cost money, but re-doing it while living in the best part of the home, we are close to having our retirement home completed. Home: $21,900, cost of repairs: about $38,000, value of the home now: about $125,000. Keep in mind we are on 1 1/4 acre, 2688 sq. ft.
  • Valerie
    on Dec 19, 2016

    The house in my opinion, not worth the effort on remodeling, it would actually need to be gutted, however per some of the other comments, I agree with getting an inspection an inspection. Otherwise go totally for the for the land. Land is always a more valuable investment in the long run.
  • Ref15374975
    on Dec 19, 2016

    This house is completely riddled with rot and termites. How much land comes with it? That would be the only value it has, just the price of the land itself. Have that valued, it could still be a deal depending on where you are. If the value of the land is good, you could just scrape this mess and build something else on it. Some small and energy efficient would be perfect.
    • Kathleen
      on Dec 19, 2016

      I agree with what this person said, but don't forget to factor in the cost of getting the land exterminated of the termites. That can cost several thousand.
  • Kathryn Waddell Jetter
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Get the big bad wolf to blow it away , See what the land is worth.
  • Happy Days Hometalker
    on Dec 19, 2016

    1: Get an appraisal.
    2: Get a home inspection
    Then make a decision, if it pencils out, by all means.
  • Lorraine Northam
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I've lived in houses that looked better than this one but needed lots and lots of work. I've remodeled a home too. Get a professional inspection first. Find out what the land is worth. If the land is worth more than the asking price, and you have cash saved to purchase without having to finance anythin, I'd get family and friends to help me tear down this house then either put in a nice double wide or build an really energy efficient small house and you would be in great shape.
  • Eileen H
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Grab it!!! Every community - usually at county level - offers re-hab grants or very low intereest loans. Check out what's available in your area.

  • Kelly
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would jump at the chance.
  • Debigray
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Most have stated above. Challenging for the unknown factors. You can call your County Building Dept. and ask for an inspector probably at no cost. See what he says. Call a Realtor on the Value of the Land all property inclusive not just the house or structures. See if it is on a foundation or wood floor up on piers. The house may be a total tear down or not. Looks too like Termite or serious wood rot. You can price repairs out for windows, plumbing, electrical plus permits depending on the county. Salvage what you can, if tear down. Old kitchen sinks, knobs etc can bring good money. This would be a great place to learn and of course ask questions if you choose to repair. You can raise your Novice Status and who knows you may get the itch to do more. Very generous of your neighbor and could be a very profitable investment. Even if just the land. Do your homework on permits and cost of doors, windows etc. Lay it all out. Make a decision that will make you happy. Please keep us all posted ! Best of luck in your process.
    California DIY
    • Dawn Renee' Lemons Freeman
      on Dec 19, 2016

      I generally agree with one exception--DON'T ask a realtor about the value of the land and structures, check with the county taxing department. Property valuations are usually done through the tax assessors office, should be available to the public and may be online. At the very least, set up an appointment to talk to someone in the office about the property valuation and whether or not the taxes are current. Take the pictures you have and explain that you are considering buying and rehabbing it. If the person you talk to doesn't know anything, ask to speak to someone who had been there a LONG time. I LITERALLY asked the person I spoke to over the phone to check to see if there was an old, white-haired guy in a corner office in the basement who might be able to answer my questions, and SHE FOUND HIM!! LOL. Do plenty of research, and realize it's going to be a lot more work than you think, but it will be worth it! Also, check with local high schools or other places that have vocational training in building trades. You might be able to get free labor by providing them an educational opportunity. You'll have to be able to pay for all the materials as they need them, but if you have the money or can get the financing for that, it could save you some time and frustration. (BTW--high school VO TECH students built my aunt and uncle's house from the ground up and did a great job! They're supervised and generally interested in learning about what they're doing. Good luck!
  • Mickey
    on Dec 19, 2016

    As long as it stands you can get a loan...once it goes down your loans dry out. Get an builder to help you make the home you want and can afford. Pay for the plans and go to the bank......someone will help you make it better...
  • Jeanna
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would do it! It will take time and money, but you will learn so much, you can make it what you want. Places like home depot are a great place for information. Plus, like Eileenmh said there are usually loans and grants. Wish I could help.

  • Dwo5286852
    on Dec 19, 2016

    They don't make anymore land. Like most have said, price the lot and blow it down. plus anything you can salvage has value. Why do I see scrappers every trash day. Heck, I've done it.
    Wookworking Dan the handyman
  • Bernadette Staal
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Look at the lovely shape of the house and imagine what it could look like when it is finished. First of all the cost of the land has to be worth more than $15K so that is a bonus. The house is a lovely shape. If you have the skills and have seen the numerous programs on TV where people take buildings that are crumbling and where everything seems to go wrong at the end the people are so happy and even if you have to rebuild most of it, you can get parts from second hand window specialist - second hand wood etc. I think I see beauty in the home. Personally I could not do the work but if I could and if I had the time I would say YES PLEASE. I can see this house sparkle and a lovely garden will finish it off. $15K is a dream come true.
  • Meg
    on Dec 19, 2016

    My husband and I buy, rehab and sell. We once bought a cottage I simply could not believe he wanted to buy!!! I called it "one step up from squatting in the woods" He fixed it and we sold it for a profit. Value of the land is important and will vary by location significantly. Advise on checking into it is the best. Be ready to work hard and get dirty, but the payoff to "sweat equity" is worth it.
  • Allison Velez
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would buy it just for the kitchen ceilings! None of the things in your pictures looks unrehabable, but what can't you see? I agree spring for an appraisal, it will give you more clarity. Also be aware what your resale value would be and/or rental potential. a one bedroom is not going to be great on either of those probably. But of course, you could add a bedroom!
  • Mcu11939048
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I have rehabed 15 houses pay for a inspection this will tell you are the bones stable also find out what just the lot is worth .Is it liveable whike you work on it this will save money
  • Junebug
    on Dec 19, 2016

    It looks like a money pit. Been there done that !.Good Luck.
  • Sophia,M.,McConnery
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would jump at this.If you can get some reasonable trades men,help them with the work,and things like that,it will reduce costs a lot.Also check out places that offer retraining in areas of house repair.It is good to help them out with hands on knowledge!
  • Barbara Rigot
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Yes, land is valuable but I think you need Chip and Joanna Gaines of HGTV's Fixer Upper.
  • Sara Gooden
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Yes the land is worth a lot . One reason they don't make any more . Hope on to it .
  • Debigray
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Thank you and I forgot to mention to check and see if any back taxes or liens are on the property because if they are not cleared you will need to have him clear them prior to you purchasing .
  • Sue Hunter
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Watch Fixer Upper on HGTV. You will learn a lot. There are other shows that teach many things like Flip or Flop.
  • Sue Hunter
    on Dec 19, 2016

    You could do a tear down and get a tiny house.
    • Carole Alden
      on Dec 19, 2016

      Tiny house cost as lot to buy and what abut the neighborhood, would you want to live there?
  • Lynn c
    on Dec 19, 2016

    we bought a run down fixer upper in 1996 worst house in town really 20 yrs later we have what we set out to achieve, It took alot longer cost tons more than anticipated but i learned so many skills in fixing our "dump". it is now one of the towns jewels. be prepared for alot of blood sweat & tears
  • Catherine Bridges
    on Dec 19, 2016

    The land alone should be worth $15,000. If you have somewhere to stay while you gut it I would take it and have some experts come in for estimates ( to get free advice) then you can pay them for what you cannot do and do the rest yourself. An inspector would be my first call only because what is not up to code should be brought up to code.-wish I had that deal-good luck!!
  • Catherine Bridges
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Is that in Virginia??
  • Mar1293249
    on Dec 19, 2016

    The windows look good. How much land does it have? You could later get something built there. Even if it had termites, I would get it if there is no sink holes, or flooding happening there. In other words, there is many things to consider, besides property taxes. Good luck!
  • Jade
    on Dec 19, 2016

    I would definitely buy it. Counter offer 12,000
  • Letitia
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Get a good home inspection to see what you are getting into. Look for any taxes or liens. If you have more time then money then it will be a good learning experience. Anything can be repaired you just have to have the patience to plow through it. If you have another place to live in until it is habitable great. I wouldn't live in it until the roof and foundation is secure and it is rewired and insulated. Winter is here! Good Luck.
  • Sen15092564
    on Dec 19, 2016

    How ever is good to try and fix. Im a lady and i will do . Wish to get good dill like this , no more to find one bedroom house . You are yang and you can do if you want, if you have the target will work. Good luck.
  • Marquetta
    on Dec 19, 2016

    It would depend on the location of the house and land. If it's in a good part of the town/county by all means yes buy and repair. At the very least you can tare it down and build a small house or a trailor house. where is the house and land? In a good city/State?? If not turn and run as fast as you can. If I couldn't flip it for at least three times what I have in it, I would not touch it.
  • Cbl8775653
    on Dec 19, 2016

    How much land? What is the value of the land? Is it 15 K free and clear or are there are costs such as liens, back taxes, etc? Does it have city water and sewer? If not what is the condition of the well and septic system? Looks to have rotting wood, window issues, siding issues, gutter issues and probably mores issues. If you tore it down and rebuilt, can you get permits to built on this lot? Get a home inspection. Pay particular attention to plumbing and wiring issues. Painting is cheap and easy to do; however repairing bad or non code plumbing and elctrical is much harder and much much more clostly. The kitchen cabinets and ceiling look usable. Good luck
  • Blanche loiselle
    on Dec 19, 2016

    If the property is worth anything  then tear down the houshe and build with a prefab, they are a great value
  • John Jackson
    on Dec 19, 2016

    Sure it needs work but the price is great, it looks like a total gut. new roof ,windows doors, some rotten sills,etc 30 to 40 grand might do it with your work
  • Connie
    on Dec 20, 2016

    What are comps going for in the area? Would it be feasible to doze then put up a modular? Just maybe a couple of questions to check into. sounds like you would want to live in it as opposed to renting or flipping? Sounds like a deal though. Best of luck whatever you decide! If you renovate would love to see pics as you go if possible.
  • Pat
    on Dec 20, 2016

    You should look into getting a 203k HUD loan. You can take out a loan for 50K and pay off the 15k and have 35K to do renovations. Find a home inspector who is certified HUD inspector. Have them do the home inspection and the same inspector work with the lender to do the draw inspections for the 203k. Or take out a 203k loan and level the house. As long as you use the same foundation you can rebuild a new house. Go to info@homelandhomeinspectors.com and read up on the 203k loan and if you have any questions feel free to give us a call. Good luck on your endeavor. Please let us know what you decided.

  • Sue
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Most definitely, it has good vibes and good bones, just needs some love and attention.Good Luck to you,go for it.
  • Joseph Glackin
    on Dec 20, 2016

    It appears to be on quite a hill. Have a home inspector check the lower foundation carefully. If it is sound, the place is worth it You could tear out the house and rebuild from the foundation up.
  • Lucy Marie Bernier
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I agree with you...
  • Linda Sturgill
    on Dec 20, 2016

    This could be a great deal. Yes, it will need a lot of work. That times, money and commitment. If you have these then go for it. You can learn to do whatever you need to do. There are resources out there. Big jobs like electricity, plumbing, or foundation work may take professional help. Get all the details, get some idea of repair costs, and pray. Then go into the deal with your eyes open. If I were young again I would take it on in a second. Good luck.
  • Beverly
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I am an old soul and see that at one time long ago that house was full of love but the years of no care has beaten it down.
    Everyone is right you have a lot to think about, wiring, plumbing and so on. If it is in a good area then I would put your touch and love in the house. Just cover your basis, protect your investment and you will make the right decision.
    Good Luck in whatever you decide.
  • TMP
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Spend $250 for a thorough inspection by a highly regarded contractor. I say contractor, because they can give you a realistic idea on how much repairs and renovations will run you, as well as a timeline of what needs to be done first and what can wait until you have the cash. If you live in an area where housing is really expensive (I'm in Seattle and the house and land you've pictured would go for around $450,000), this might be a fabulous first home opportunity.
  • Ese8934807
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Go for it,my dad always told us if you have any land you will always have money, good luck on whatever you decide
  • Jerry
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I bought an old house built in the 20's and it was a one bedroom , 1 bed, 650 square feet. It needed a lot of work but after about 5 years of work a little at a time, it was worth it. I am single and didn't start this until I was almost 55 and it was fun and worth every minute of it. Just get a liscense contractor and if the foundation is good. Buy it.
  • Rachelmary
    on Dec 20, 2016

    How much land goes w/ house? Check out all the bones , they will tell you a lot. Look in city/ town hall for answers.
  • Njc2121324
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I think it is adorable ... however get some one who will tell you the truth of
    what has to be done to bring it up to code and livable. If you are by yourself,
    and you have nice neighbors, it could be enchantingly nice!
  • Candy Walsh
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I agree, I LOVE old houses, just please make sure you get a licensed highly rated inspector. Call the BBB and check them out and get as many references as you can. If he says it's all good, I'd go for it! That house is probably full of so many memories! You can do it. Good luck and let us know what you decide :)
  • Turtle
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Professional Inspector first, then licensed contractor and remember that his or her estimate will be very low compared to end cost no matter how good and ethical the contractor, then take a construction course at your community college. This last is what made this possible for me. And I now have my private Eden!
  • Sandi
    on Dec 20, 2016

    find out what the appraised value is. what is going on the street? are the neighboring houses all in the same shape? you don't want to out price the neighborhood.
  • M-L
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Assuming that the area around the house is a good one, take it. Even if you decide to demo the house (or gut it) and rebuild it, you would be way ahead, I would think.

  • Cobra85ca
    on Dec 20, 2016

    The land alone is worth more than the house. great deal!
  • Ann Smitt
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Hire a State Licensed Home Inspector, costs vary per state, to inspect the house and give you a written report on the structure. Also go to city hall department of taxes and deeds, make sure their are no liens against the property or easements. Go to your Credit Union and get pre-approved for a 15-year fixed rate mortgage to lock in a low interest rate. Draw up a budget for your new monthly mortgage payments and utilities. Then draw up another budget for major renovations start with the roof, electrical, plumbing, heating/cooling all the essentials first then do the cosmetic changes. We bought a repossessed home that looked like the Bailey House from the movie 'It's A Wonderful Life,' all the steel framed windows were boarded and busted/missing; furnace was rotted; water heater shot etc. that was 31-years ago. We did all the necessary repairs on a tiny budget and with lots of help from family we were able to move in after 3-months hard labor. Best of luck.
  • Carolyn
    on Dec 20, 2016

    It can be done. Time, patience, money and hard work. Please keep everyone posted on your progress.
  • Kathi bakker
    on Dec 20, 2016

    The important stuff, foundation, and termite damage. Get those reports before committing
  • Jeannie Carle
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I would do allll those things the above posters mentioned - then, if all is still well, go for it. This could be the smartest, most wonderful decision you ever made. Just remember - the basics come first - NOT the cosmetics, unless you want to plant pretties.
  • Analice Resende Afonso
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Quero ver as fotos di antes e depois.
  • Diana Deiley
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Rule #1: Home Inspection by certified inspector. Once you verify that the 'bones' are solid you can proceed.
    And yes, I think it has great potential to be a budget beauty! I can picture two over sized dormers, a wrap around porch, a new windowed breakfast room on one side of the house, and maybe adding a great room with a 2 car drive under garage. You can do anything you want, when you want. Don't rush, do your research, reach out to your resale stores and local paint stores, and always always always measure twice, cut once. Best of luck.
  • Mar7331663
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I would for go the hoe inspection I don't think a bank will approve and if they do you will have to complete it in a certain amount of time. Inspections can cast several hundred dollars and that is money you could use to repair it. I would see that it is okay with city hall that's free and if it is approved see if the owner wants to finance it ( owner financed) and do that. Then down the road get when it is repaired get a bank loan if you want to. Inspectors' can only tell you what they see. They can not see what is behind the walls or under the floor. Save that money for construction. It looks to me like it needs to be gutted and rewired plumbed and insulated. New windows. You can get a lot from habitat and craigs list. They have lumber and cabinets in great shape for free just have to remove them for someone. So check out the foundation and get started
    • Mar7331663
      on Dec 20, 2016

      I wrote to fast I meant to say inspections cost several hundred dollars. And make sure city hall has approved the property for the house
  • Ruthan Grider
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I am from the area, i love this home. It can be fixed.
    God bless you and your new home.
  • Eliane
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Take it ! I already see it , the most beautiful little cottage, and white roses in front !!!GOD bless your new home
  • Susan
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Get a few job estimates from building contractors before you purchase the property. DON'T use anyone that's not a reputable company. Hate to say it but contracting/remodeling is a field where there are alot of con artists and you say you don't know much about construction, you would be an easy victim of fraud. I don't want to scare you but it's a very lucrative scam. The lowest price is not always the best if they take your money and run. Important too, don't ever ever pay money to anyone until the job is DONE and inspected.
  • J Jo
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Excellent advice by Ann Smitt above! I was about to post: Have the 'bones' examined..... carefully! Check for the need of any sump pump(s); if 'any' are required, whether currently in place or needed, R-U-N! (Don't ask me how I know). DO make a checklist of ALL the details listed by Ann Smitt, and USE it. Take a critical look at the surroundings, i.e. traffic, parking, commercial noises/smells/pollution of any kind. How much ground will you need to keep mowed; do you have the time for it? Are practical stores nearby? Is your place of employment at an acceptable distance for you? Ask mature homeowners to stop by and render their thoughts/opinions. By all means, don't fear hard work, or rough living especially while you are young and healthy. You'll gain a world of experience, build character, and have many wonderful stories to share!
    • Sue Kiene
      on Dec 20, 2016

      In some areas sump pumps are a very common thing such as where I live in Michigan and Ohio. Also depending on whether there is a crawl or a basement may make the difference whether there is one or not. Where I live now, I have a basement. If I did not have a sump pump, I would have a wet basement. Where I lived last, I was on a crawl with no sump pump. Before that 2 different homes both with sump pumps. If a sump pump runs all the time, yes that is a bad thing. Better to have a sump pump in case there is a need at aany time for it then to not have one and end up with standing water.
  • Cgu13759159
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Network ...make sure someone is willing to go into crawl space (?) for rotting joists
    or failing columns, or termite evidence.
    I had a licensed inspector who knew zero about foundations.
    Take it slow & do take land value into
    consideration. Possibllity for a construction loan.
    Don't go broke nor deeeply into debt.

    Blessings !
  • Carol
    on Dec 20, 2016

    In California that house would be a Bargain at $15,000. It is going to take a lot of money to bring that house back from the dead but it can be done slowly over a long period of time. You are young and able, and perhaps you have friends that will help with making repairs. Doing most of the work yourself will provide you with valuable knowledge and experience which is always worthwhile. This doesn't have to be your 'forever' home, but will get you into the real estate market and that is always a good thing. I say go for it. There are plenty of people on this board to help, there is Pinterest and Youtube. You can do it!
  • Dar6309798
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I bought a 1883 cottage asking price was $16,000! I bought it as is no inspections for $5,000! I have lived in it for 14 years did all the work myself! Its shotgun cottage. I love it! My taxes are $350 a year! Huge yard for my dog! I was willing to buy as is for great price! Just my experience! Since I did all my own work I saved a lot of money. Lol! Not for the faint of heart! Good luck!!!
  • Renata
    on Dec 20, 2016

    If I remember right this same post was posted over a yr ago.
  • Gimme
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Hi, I'm a retired Union Carpenter. I have bought & sold Real Estate, owned property, rehabbed property, etc. !st - check with the your city hall about zoning & permits, codes & any updating required. 2nd - check your county assessors office about taxes AND if it is listed for a "Tax Sale" (VERY IMPORTANT), 3rd - get free estimates to get an idea of the extent of the work involved AND the possible cost. 4th - EDUCATE YOURSELF on repairs, go to youtube you can find a video on anything!!! Even if you don't do the work, you will know if the person you hire is doing it right! What are your intentions for the property, to rent it out, rehab & sell it or live in it? I wouldn't pay $15,000, I'd make an offer of $8,000 and go from there. The photo shows it needs LOTS OF WORK, but your main concerns are the structure, the roof, plumbing, electrical, windows, HVAC, hot water tank, floors & insulation. NOTICE I didn't list drywall, paint, light fixtures, etc. because these are cosmetic. Drywall is important BUT isn't expensive ($5.00 for a 4 X 8 sheet). If there are any open areas on the house COVER THEM AND KEEP THE ELEMENTS OUT until you decide what you are going to do. Weather & critters are a MAJOR PROBLEM that you want to avoid (rain in the summer & snow and ice in the winter, squirrels, cats, mice, rats, etc - bad, bad, bad!). I hope this information helps you. May God bless you in your endeavor! Happy Holidays!
  • Sharon Sievers Johns
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I would pay a Contractor to come in and give you a list of what repairs are needed jyst to bring it up to code first. That would give you a base fugure to work with. I think it could be made into a cute little cottage.
  • Ann Harris
    on Dec 20, 2016

    have electric , water checked. If you have to rewire and replumb everything you are talking big bucks which will have to be addressed first. If you have a good amount of money to fix it up. Then budget accordingly. Good Luck.
  • Elizabeth Roy
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I definitely would. Talk to the owner about getting estimates on necessary repairs inside and out then go from there. With a good reputable contractor, you can have a sweet cozy little home that will only increase in value. And, you may surprise yourself with just how much you can do on your own. Also, discuss with the contractor helping to lower some of the costs, especially tearing down. Good luck and please keep us posted especially with work being done!
  • Pat Walker
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I'm sure the land would be worth that much even if the house was not salvageable. See what it's worth. You never know but you might be able to resell land for a nice profit.
  • Lucy Lois Gibson Watkins
    on Dec 20, 2016

    I'm can't give good advice o the construction of the house, but I sure can visualize how beautiful it could be outwardly. Navy Blue paint with off white trim......ummmm with a gorgeous front door. Shrubbery, shutters to make the windows look more in scale of the house. Oh la la!

  • Shauna Steadman
    on Dec 20, 2016

    Oh Boy! As one who has done home restoration for forty odd years ( I am now 75 and female ), who lives in Charleston WV, who knows of a $10,000 house in my block nestled among homes of $200,000 value or more, who is also restoring an historic home, who can't find contractors who want to work, Etc, Etc. - my advise: : go slow and follow every bit of advise you get in this posting. This could be a can of worms. I love the Marietta area. I also know that it is a depressed area, as is Parkersburg just across the Ohio. BUT, I also love old homes and fixing them up, so this could be what your passion is. It could be an amazing journey, as it has been for me. Good luck!
  • Dri11852906
    on Dec 20, 2016

    RUN..RUN away that house is a money pit. if you knew everything you needed to know about houses and you could do the work yourself,you could fix it up enough to sell it for a small profit. But knowing nothing about houses you would have to pay somebody to do all the work and pay for materials also ..you would lose your shirt and everything else you own trying to fix it up enough to make a profit. that house is a rotting disaster....
  • Tex Butch
    on Dec 20, 2016

    folks, you really should read before you comment. They bought it. They tore it down. They are putting a manufactured home on the lot. Done!
    • Cathy C
      on Dec 23, 2016

      This came to me in a "can you help" email. There are over 500 comments on this post. I don't know about you but I'm not reading that many comments before I comment so..... Thank you for letting us know that this is over. Maybe hometalk could stop sending emails about helping in situations where the solution has been found!

  • RuthF
    on Dec 21, 2016

    Hi again, Daniel!

    When I left my post the other day, I forgot to offer one additional suggestion. (I haven't read all the other ones that have come in today, so if this was already covered by someone, my apologies).

    You mentioned that you don't have a lot of skill as far as home reno work goes. One fantastic way to get that skill is to volunteer with Habitat for Humanity. When you go on a build, especially when they're starting from the ground up, you get first-hand knowledge of how to do things the right way. The person in charge of the build is a pro, at least that was the case in my area.

    So, if you decide to tackle repair work yourself, you'll have gained some hands-on experience. Even more important, you'll be able to monitor the work done by many of the people you might hire. Nothing is worse (for your wallet or peace of mind) than having to clean up behind a bad contractor.

    Good luck, and let everybody know what you decide to do!
  • Ren11344130
    on Dec 21, 2016

    SO Cute and such potential. You have got to revive it. There is so much you can do to this precious little cottage. Good Luck and follow Pinterest. That is were you will find wonderful remodeling ideas.
  • Pamela
    on Dec 21, 2016

    YES! But plan to replace, wire, plumbing, roof, electrical..... 50k plus then maybe the floor joist and misc. ....another 5k. Then the kitchen 5-10k and baths 5k each....this is based if you do most of the work yourselves. We bought a home for 26k.... spent about 25k in renovatons and now have it listed for 250k. It's been a lot of work but well worth it.
    • Jim
      on Feb 15, 2017

      Why are so many referring to thiis as a manufactured home? it doesn't look like any manufactured home I have ever seen, if anything, I would believe it was a build a home from a kit type of house. they were sold out of Sears and Roebuck catalog's for a long long time.
  • Sov15324718
    on Dec 22, 2016

    They put a manufactured home on it????....sorry but in my opinion, there is no value in a manufactured home. Nothing compared to a stick built house. I own a lot of real estate but never, ever would buy a manufactured home.
  • RuthF
    on Dec 22, 2016

    Sorry, I missed the update, too. Kind of hard to keep up with this many posts.

    But...I think they did the right thing overall, and as for value of a manufacturered home, it really depends on where you live. In an area with a lot of retirees, for example, you won't lose money, or in places with a lot of younger folks just starting out. We got outbid on 2 such homes, and they both sold for over $100K!
    • Sov15324718
      on Dec 26, 2016

      And there are people out there that go overboard for something that is not worth over $100K. It is whatever a person is willing to pay. Imagine what it would have been worth if it were a stick built home.
  • FRED RIGGS
    on Dec 22, 2016

    Basic trailer. manufactured home is high falutin word for a house trailer. Not good. You could have lost your shirt and shoes on redoing that mess.
    • Anne Alexander
      on Dec 23, 2016

      house trailer term used during post world war 11, term now used is mobile home or manufactured home. difference is how the are sit up, FYI...
  • Jace Jones
    on Dec 22, 2016

    Every house is worth it if the foundation is good
    • Sue Kiene
      on Dec 23, 2016

      How much is a one bedroom home worth in Mansfield OH totally fixed up? BTW I can show you many 3 and 4 bedroom homes with good foundations that are not worth $15000
  • Robert J Wylie
    on Dec 22, 2016

    They have manufactured homes that are stick built to code for Hurricanes . They are nothing like a trailer. They are less expensive because they are factory built and are the same as a built in place home. very few can tell and many think they are better because of the fastening systems , Glue, Nails and screws.,
  • RuthF
    on Dec 23, 2016

    The definition of "manufactured" can be a little confusing. I'm old-school, so to me a manufactured house has wheels to get delivered to the site. Often, the bottom gets skirting around it. But even though it's supposed to be transportable, usually that's not practical. However, those wheels do save you on taxes in most jurisdictions.

    A modular, on the other hand, gets set up via a crane and installed on a foundation. I had one, and would NEVER go back to stick-built if starting from scratch. No warped wood, under roof in a day, with as much or as little interior finishing as you want. And you can go simple, as in 900-1,000 square foot, on up to multi-story "mucho dinero" ones (which my neighbor did. Hers was assessed at almost $300K. So modulars are definately not house trailers! They're taxed just the same as stick-built.

    Well, one thing I think we all agree on: This topic sure got a lot of responses! Happy Holidays to everyone:)
    • Sue Kiene
      on Dec 23, 2016

      Modulars are not necessarily crane set. Roll sets are very common. Depends on location and lot. Manufactured homes can also be installed on a foundation or they can have skirting but then so can modulars. On a foundation there are no tax benefits. Most locations have building codes that must be adhered to to be put modular and manufactured homes on a lot. Modular homes must follow at least state building code and local codes may apply as well dependent on location. Manufactured homes are built to a federal building code. Manufactured homes have 2 or 3 sets of matching tags on them which must be in place for financing purposes, forever and ever. If installed on a lot both modulars and manufactured homes must have their titles relinquished and proof of same must be retained and is usually a good idea to put into county records. There are all grades of manufactured and modular homes, some are good, some are bad. In my location, they are almost impossible to finance. Due to that, the value goes down and down. A very large number of them were foreclosures from 2007-2012. Most were worth less than half and many times 75% less what they had been financed for. If they are in a park then they are pretty much impossible to sell and most times it is the park that is doing the financing themselves. I feel very bad for the owners. Parks around here charge $350-500/mo lot rent as a norm.
  • Linda Houston
    on Jan 3, 2017

    Daniel Dye Marietta, OHon Apr 16, 2016
    Here's a little tid-bit update: Well we did make the purchase. The gas, water, etc. hook ups were already there and the land was good so it cut down on a lot of work we would have to do if we started on land. And we have some of It demolished already (Trash company has huge bins you can rent). We have the foundation re-done already (It had some cracks but a local company did great!), and we have our eyes on a nice Double-Wide that can be sat down on top of foundation. Pictures will follow with everything! Got to go!
    • Jim
      on Feb 15, 2017

      You tore it down? OMG what did you do with all that beautiful wood? I wouldn't recommend a nice double wide, because there's no such thing as a nice mobile anything they are extremely light weight and are only required to meet federal regulations (pratically none) I suggest you go for pre-fabricated home it's built just like a regular house only in sections that are assembled on your land they must conform with federal, state and local regulations.
      p.s. You should have just rehabbed the house the siding looked like really good and impossible to find these days wood and you would have needed to replace the windows anyway.
  • She15067125
    on Jan 3, 2017

    You did well then. The idea of not trying to refurbish it is smart I think. I love our remodeled farmhouse. To be honest, I could see this is in much better condition. So, fixing the foundation and putting a manufactured is smart. Yes, if the land and the location is good--and you love it, and you have the hookups in, then this can be worth it. Good luck and enjoy.
  • Hackiem
    on Jan 3, 2017

    Great Job.
  • Marilyn
    on Feb 19, 2017

    I hope you didn't take this "deal". When my husband and I were planning to buy a house we had a professional look over the property. As he went through the house he said there was this little problem, and this little problem, and this little problem, etc. He never said that for HIM they were just little problems...but for us they would cost a fortune to get fixed...by someone like him. We bought it and regretted it from Day 1.
  • Charyl Greenia
    on Feb 23, 2017

    Congrats! I think you made a good decision, you indicated you knew next to nothing about DIY repairs this house required. Given that you made the best choice. The land with water, sewer, and power is worth what you paid. And if you purchased a good quality manufactured home and take care of it, you can live there forever. Many people put down manufactured homes based on little knowledge. I have owned several homes in my life some stick built and some manufactured. My first was a brand new stick built and have never been sorry to have sold it. I have had very good results with manufactured homes and just bought my last home three months ago. It is a manufactured home and I love it. Best of luck to you!
  • Ruth Ann
    on Mar 17, 2017

    It's definitely not worth that much if it's in Flint, Michigan. Those houses sell for around $2000. I know from experience.
  • Margie
    on Mar 21, 2017

    Hi, the pictures are from July 2016. What did you decide to do? Curious.
  • Sonia
    on May 7, 2017

    the house looks pretty beat up. But I'd have to ask how much land would you also be purchasing? It may be a good buy but I don't know the value of property in the area. The house looks pretty beat up.
  • Angela Clark
    on May 10, 2017

    It's slanted the outside can be fix not costing much but what about the inside you are really gonna have to weigh your options. How much can you get as a home improvement loan?
  • Virginia Keith
    on May 19, 2017

    You don't want to invest in something that more than likely you can not find on your own. Check the foundation for cracks if damagedthis can cause 000 to fix for my friend his main been was broken cost 25000 to replace an fix
  • Lovellah
    on May 22, 2017

    RUN AWAY FROM IT! If you had to get a loan - no one would loan on this. 1000 square ft of land , etc. That's nothing (like 25'x40')! And, unless you're in an "artsy" town with other 1-bedrooms - who would be in the market for this? By the time you upgraded everything to "code" (electrical/building/etc) - you're going to be spending some $$ and it's not even something you can see!

    RUN - This is no bargain just because it seems cheap - and those taxes even sound high for a $15K house! What's the rest of the neighborhood look like? And you couldn't really even rent it with 1 bedroom. It looks eaten with termites and has a bad foundation on unlevel land. City water & sewage?

    Run run run ( I was a real estate broker for 20 years - run)
  • Jody Price
    on Jun 12, 2017

    If it's in a great neighborhood, go for it! If not, walk away.
  • Denise
    on Jun 12, 2017

    Run away from this deal as fast as you can. The foundation is cracked and there is a lot of rotted wood on the photos.
  • Pat
    on Aug 9, 2017

    I'm excited for you the cost of house now is cheaper than buying a car... fix it basically so that you can live in it and do repairs while living there and it will be a great investment

  • Rosalie Rogers
    on Aug 17, 2017

    WHEN IN DOUBT, DO NOTHING!!!!!!!!!!Words to live by!
  • Sharon
    on Aug 17, 2017

    Boy lot of water damage and wood rot, foundation tilting. But the land would be worth it and build a tiny home of your own.
  • Sharon Susa Courchesne
    on Aug 17, 2017

    I'd get a house inspection before you commit to anything & see what exactly you'd be getting yourself into but from the looks of it, looks like some very extensive work almost to the point of potentially starting from scratch. Do you know anyone that could help you to do some of the reno if you did purchase it? I think this is way beyond the scope of a DYI if you're not experienced. If you have family or friends who work in construction then you'd be in a better position to purchase.
  • Tina
    on Sep 3, 2017

    It depends on the extent of the rot and how much you can actually do yourself, also the area and amount of land. Check with other listings in and around that neighborhood to see past and present values but most important check the structure of the house. If there is to much rot it is often cheaper to build new than repair old.
  • Laura Pettit
    on Sep 3, 2017

    Just wondering if you bought the house? Most of the comments here are from two years ago.

  • Barb Dauber
    on Sep 3, 2017

    I love it. It has cute lines. The rot around the window scares me, but I found that fixing things isn't so hard if you can cut a measured sill.
    I would worry about Termites and ants that eat wood. Little by little, this cute little house would shine again. Whenever you have a birthday or something Ask your family to give you tools.


  • Cherri
    on Sep 3, 2017

    I would have an inspection done for the foundation.electric and plumbing and then make a decision.
  • Ellis
    on Sep 3, 2017

    RUN, do not walk, away from this "Project." There is a reason your neighbor wants you to alleviate his pain and take this off his hands. The house is a tear down.
  • Karen
    on Sep 7, 2017

    Karen T, I totally agree with the realtor in the very beginning who suggested you get inspections done. You need to know what shape the foundation is in as well as do you have a well, septic, things like that. I've learned a lot in moving several times. Wiring is extremely important and if not up to code can cost a fortune. Each time a house is redone it needs to meet todays code standards for a certificate of occupancy. It's apparent that you'd need permits for work on that home. That too I'm sure might come into play. I'd try to find out about that too if I were you. Hope it all works out the way it should for you. If this isn't the one for you there's always another down the road. Keep going don't get discouraged. Good luck.

  • Bobbi Lively
    on Sep 20, 2017

    A lot of your decision should be based on the value of properties around there. I would get bids in repair making sure they break out the labor cost from the materials. I am sure there will be jobs you will have to hire out but you will be able to get an idea of the cost to fix the place up. Then take those costs plus the cost to purchase and see where it comes in relation to the other properties. That answer should help you make your decision On whether it is worth it or not. Good luck!

  • Pauletta Sanders
    on Sep 20, 2017

    There seems to be a lot of water damage. Is there a cistern connected to the house? How much acreage is with the house? If there is enough ground to make it worthwhile, you could just demolish the house and sell the ground or build on it. I would advise you to get estimates from a reputable contractor before committing to renovation. That is one BIG job for a newbie, even if he is a willing worker.
  • KOKO LOKO TOKO
    on Sep 27, 2017

    123
  • KOKO LOKO TOKO
    on Sep 27, 2017

    1233
  • TAMMY SPALSBURY
    on Sep 30, 2017

    Hi there my husband and I have renovated 3 houses. It can be a very costly project, and location and property taxes is also a consideration. If your going to do the work all yourself, is more cost effective. But also have to consider materials you would need are expensive. And also depends on your budget /money you have available to spend. The houses we've renovated we completely gutted. This house is in terible condition, my though is it's really worth the effort. If your going to be able to make it beautiful and live in it without going into debt. Or you can afford to renovate it and sell it and come out with a chunk of money. Either way you go keep us all posted. Good luck Either Way




  • Jea29373494
    on Sep 30, 2017

    How good is the foundation? The framing etc. IOW, how much money will it take to make it livable? What is neighborhood like? These are answers I would want.
  • Shi6571699
    on Oct 1, 2017

    I don't know where you location is really but if the price is good and how much land comes with it? I am an older lady and I have researched on how to do a lot of this repair! If I could do it and you are young and have a stable living place now you could always do little by little as far as buying building supplies etc and research as far as construction goes! I would say heck yes do it! you could rebuild and repair like you want and as expensive as you want. I think in the long run these repairs etc would make you feel good and proud when you finished and then you would know how well it was reconstructed! Good luck!
  • Leslie Hume
    on Oct 3, 2017

    i would have a licensed contractor look at it and give you an estimate or at the very least an idea of what needs to be done and the cost. It might be a great flip or a cute home
  • Rose Broadway
    on Oct 3, 2017

    Run the opposite direction from the house. As fast as you can!
  • Lisa Mastrogiovanni
    on Oct 6, 2017

    I'm not an expert, but have owned several homes. Without you telling me what you are able to do yourself, or what resources you have as far as family is concerned to help you, or even if your goal is to live in it or use this as an investment, I'm going to give you my advice as if I were looking at this as my home to live in it...

    If I had nowhere to stay while the home was made inhabitable, I would not want to live there while the work was taking place. At the MINIMUM, based on the pictures, the home will need a roof and windows. There is also no guarantee that it is structurally sound because it looks like there is a photo of some foundation damage, and either the camera is crooked or the house leans in another. I would have an engineer look at it before you commit to anything.
    Did you go into the basement or the crawl space? If not, that's absolutely necessary. Are the pipes all in good shape? Is the electrical and plumbing up to date? Meaning, is there a fuse box or breaker box?
    Frankly, based on the pics alone, I would not do it. The repairs I see there in just roof and windows are expensive. I just had 12 small windows done for $6,000 (lowest quote; highest quote was $18,000). Depending on if you need a whole roof (complete tearoff or not, you could be looking at close to the same for the roof. Compare that to the FMV of other 1/1 homes in the area and realize that 1/1 homes are in very low demand, and I'd pass. Don't EVER, for the sake of resale, buy a one bed, one bath home. They're too hard to sell. They're only good for investment properties.
  • M. M..
    on Oct 9, 2017

    You've gotten a LOT of answers, so I don't know if you'll read mine, but I'd run from that house - you'd end up practically building a whole new house, so bad investment. Don't throw good money after bad, right???
  • Ell29621460
    on Oct 14, 2017

    What is the foundation like and the sewer and water?
  • Cit24302123
    on Oct 19, 2017

    I would check out structure and roof. The mild is concerning as well. The windows look like they need replacing but the other stuff looks cosmetic. Do your homework and get free estimates on these and then make your decision. good luck
  • S W
    on Oct 19, 2017

    TURN AROUND and RUN. ( a lot of work, needs lots of $$. Been there, done that.
  • Lisa S.
    on Oct 19, 2017

    You will not get a mortgage for this house, as it will fail any home inspection. Looks like termite damage. Does it have nice land attached to it? Depending on your local ordinances - maybe have it burned down by the fire department and out a double wide trailer there. It would cost at least $15,000.oo to have this building removed. It looks like it not level. Take a long 3 ft. level inside and lay it on the floor, bet it is way off.
  • Ro
    on Oct 19, 2017

    Only if you love it
  • Sus12205790
    on Oct 26, 2017

    Do you have the time? Do you have the money? But most important do you have people to help you ,give you pointers guide you stand by you and pat you on the back and give you a push on you once in a while? DO YOU WANT TODOIT????
  • Vickie Johnson
    on Oct 30, 2017

    I took on one just about as bad. I'm quite a bit older than you. If you don't mind issuing ALL your free time and ALL of any extra money. I've been working on mine now for 10 years but I am a female of 67 years old with COPD and it is beginning to get where I have to hire some of it out now. It's been a challenge,. If you have friends that can and will help you and you are a great handyman then yes it's a paid for starter home. but remember No time no money DONT DO. As a mom speaking to her son is the answer I have given you. Hope it helps.
  • Del30528402
    on Nov 2, 2017

    100% YES ... the land alone will be worth that ... not making any more land ... always take a chance on land .... just do your homework before renovating ...
  • Frank
    on Nov 3, 2017

    what is the best way to hang crown moulding on a vaulted ceiling
  • Vicki Wicker
    on Nov 4, 2017

    Have you ever flipped a house? Or maybe you know someone with that kind of experience? Most property sells for that much. It just depends on how much you are willing to undertake. I personally think it would be a good investment.
  • Donna Weir
    on Nov 13, 2017

    wall paper
  • Alisa Howard
    on Nov 14, 2017

    Wow. I would say it needs a lot of work. Are you planning to do the work yourself or hire it out? What are homes in the neighborhood similar to this selling for now?
  • Alisa Howard
    on Nov 14, 2017

    I would say yes if you do most of the work and flip it.
  • Lyn Peterson Marshall
    on Nov 14, 2017

    would love to know what you did. I would have said buy it, demolish the house, and put a mobile on it, if possible
  • Deb C
    on Nov 14, 2017

    needs ALOT of work. Look it over and try to get estimates from roofers, plumbers, electricians, foundation guys, window replacements, siding people FIRST. Good luck!!

  • Charles Elmore
    on Nov 19, 2017

    Rot, ? termites? Sagging roof, wood ant , rotted wood, foundation problems? on hillside--Leveling? old redo all plumbing and electrical and sewer? looks like a building permit nightmare !!!!!!! Would have to replace most of outside rotten wood around foundation anyway, sagging ceilings and walls--to replace electrical and plumbing; is it all concrete and did they use rebar for strength back then. In my estimation---- Think a teardown is eminent.
  • Hillela G.
    on Nov 26, 2017

    I can't wait to see what you decide to do!
  • Rbo29397150
    on Nov 26, 2017

    Yes....with one step at a time work.
    Best wishes.
  • Amazing Grace !
    on Dec 2, 2017

    Wowie, you have your work cut out for you on this one. Let me ask you this... How much property comes with the house? and do you have access to the roadway, or do you have to go through the property owners property to get there. If the answer is the later, you want to make sure your deed shows an "easement" which would allow you access to the home, otherwise you could be landlocked if it is not specifically stated in the deed.

    What state is this in? What were those things you were holding in your hand? From what I can see, the roof looks to be in pretty good shape, how old is the roof? Also, depending on the age of the shack - you might have to replace the plumbing because if it is old Iron pipes, they are shot. What about a well? Does it have a well, or city water? Sewer or Septic. There may be a lot of hidden expenses that you haven't considered.

    I would counter offer this man with $10 grand - but first before you speak to him, if you don't mind please answer the main questions I just asked you. I am a former Realtor, and a non-stop do-it-your-selfer... and based on the answers, I can better advise you. If you'd like to get in touch with me personally for more information, HMU with an email and I will forward my cell number. What are the taxes too? Also, important.. but most important is the driveway easement.... bernmcg2699 at gmail dot com.


  • Amazing Grace !
    on Dec 2, 2017

    Charles Elmore is probably right... I didn't realize those were termites in your hand. Depending on the property size, you might be better off dozing it and putting up a modular home. If it is a postage stamp piece of property which has NO EASEMENT to the road.. I would urge you to pass. It's the PROPERTY that's worth the Money.. not the house. Best edge against inflation is Real Estate, they aren't making any more of it.
  • Amazing Grace !
    on Dec 2, 2017

    I take back the comment about the roof being in good shape, I only looked at the photo of the weeds growing out of the gutters. The roof is obviously shot, as the ceilings are sagging and water stained. PROPERTY SIZE IS KEY HERE.. find out the details on the property, is the land sub-divided from the old neighbor? These issues are very very important when considering this purchase. Just trying to be helpful, not trying to scare you... but THOSE issues are foremost the most important. Also, one other question I forgot to ask.. Do you plan on "living" there while you do the renovation?
  • Jennifer Chase
    on Dec 26, 2017

    There are like a million answers, most I see are from people for reselling the house. Which is probably something you might want to do in the future. BUT if you are doing this to have somewhere to live.... all you need is to make sure your foundation is good, electrical isn't a fire hazard, you can replace or use the water heater and heater there, and that it already has insulation. IF you can live in it while you work on it, then that is really the goal. IF you are trying to sell that house, don't buy it. You are new to this stuff and it will cost you a lot of money in time and work, and then doing things over again. I know, because I have to redo things constantly when I don't get help.

    MOST important... absolutely do not buy that house if the foundation is bad, UNLESS the property without a house is worth a lot more. In our area, you could buy that same house and land for around $3,000 - because you would have to tear the house down and build a new one. Tearing down a house is expensive too.
  • Roy23803533
    on Jun 10, 2018

    sloping front yard landscape
  • Unique Creations By Anita
    on Jun 16, 2018

    Sometimes It is cheaper just to pull it down and rebuild. Looks like major damage. Not to sure about the price of land where you are but $15000 sounds cheap to me. A big concern I would have with a house like this would be asbestos. Here it costs so much to get it remove and you need special contractors to do it. Good luck with whatever you decide.
  • Robyn Garner
    on Jul 14, 2018

    Not understanding why you've reposted this after already getting 644 answers in 2017

    Daniel - I think you WANT to WANT the house but - as you said - you know next to nothing about how to rehab. This place is not anything you can approach alone. IF anything can be salvaged (which I doubt) the cost of materials alone will kill you. You'd have to work more than full time on the rehab (not earning $$) and it would take you YEARS to finish enough to live there safely.

    Walk away!

    Your only consideration could possibly be for the land but - pulling the house down and removing the debris would cost you at least as much as the land and you'd still have no home.
  • Lisa S.
    on Jul 17, 2018

    This is way beyond one tenant tearing up a house!

    If you want more land, and this is adjacent. Buy and knock this down. This is way beyond an inexperienced do it yourselfer. This house was let go a long time.

  • Eliane
    on Aug 15, 2018

    Did you ever buy the house .?

  • Roseann8628
    on Aug 15, 2018

    Hi, I have done many house "flips" and assure you no one can answer your question looking at a photo. You need some expert help. First question, does the home come with any land or do you need to move it and find a lot? Suggest you have a general contractor or home inspector take a look at the home (in person) and let you know how much work it needs and the cost. Then have a Realtor stop by and provide you with an estimate of what the home is worth as it sits and what it would be worth after repairs/updating/cosmetic work... This could be a little doll house or it could be an endless money pit. Asking the right people for their expertise will help you decide if it's a project you'd like to take on. Wishing you the best of luck. :)


  • Linda
    on Aug 15, 2018

    I would have an inspection done to tell you what all the issues are. Then determine if it is worth it.

  • Linda
    on Aug 15, 2018

    I would have an inspection done to tell you what all the issues are. Then determine if it is worth it.

  • Jackie F Taylor
    on Aug 19, 2018

    OMG, where its it located, Cleveland? that is less than a used car. Your telling me, he's offering you land and it comes with a dwelling, with a kitchen, bath, that's priceless. The land is worth that much. Small places are Hugh right now, that would be just perfect for me. How lucky you are, BUY IT.

  • Jackie F Taylor
    on Aug 19, 2018

    Get in there and start dismantling stuff that you want to change, open it up, you will learn as you go, don't be intimidated, just do it. I'll give you advice, suggestions if you like, it's a small place, not like a big 4 bedroom place, this is easy money. It will be your pride and joy.

  • Jackie F Taylor
    on Aug 19, 2018

    Send me more pictures.

  • Janice
    on Aug 25, 2018

    Hi Daniel, go on to Zillow.com or Realtor.com and enter the address into their search menu and you'll get an idea of market value. The 15K sounds very inexpensive for anything that is habitable but I don't know what region/area it is located. If you live nearby that would be good because you could do repairs more easily. You could hire a good home inspector to go through it thoroughly so you know ahead of time many of the problems you may not know about or see for yourself at this point. Personally, if I were young (which I'm not) I'd likely jump on the deal. Just be sure you have a title company involved who will do a records search to insure there are no liens of any kind on the home and the taxes are paid.

    Here's an article that may help you make your decision. https://www.thisoldhouse.com/ideas/should-you-buy-fixer-upper

  • Frances
    on Sep 3, 2018

    It screams, "Run!" to me. I don't know that it would be a good investment.

  • Alice
    on Oct 22, 2018

    15,000 ??? I'd take it !!!

  • Sharon
    on Nov 2, 2018

    Dependents on where it is? If in a questionable neighbor hood I'd run but if in a decent neighbor hood I'd see if I could find some contractors that would take a good look at. They could tell you more...

  • Dbm34419323
    on Nov 23, 2018

    V


    How to clean kitchen floors

  • Fiddledd224
    on Mar 4, 2019

    I would have a real estate appraiser and an inspector come in to give you value evaluations. IF the estimates to repair it and bring it to code cost less than the anticipated value AFTER repairs, it may be a great deal. If not, then you should walk away.

  • Joanne
    on Mar 11, 2019

    From where I sit, the roof doesn't look too bad. It's a good fixer-upper. With some help from some family, plumbing ok? Keep all your slips, you probably , once it's fixed up, you could probably sell it for 3-4 times for what you paid for it. It's small but a good fixer-er upper. I'd give it a try. Land is expensive now days. J.

  • Barb Stump
    on Jun 25, 2019

    Update us what u did... if u bought it love to see your ideas an the finished look!! Good luck.

  • Susan Rossie
    on Jul 19, 2019

    Yes

  • Sonia
    on Aug 27, 2019

    Yes buy it

  • Jacoba Pretorius
    on Sep 6, 2019

    In wich Country??

  • Mamamia
    on Sep 21, 2019

    pay for an engineer to totally inspect the house for any problems it might have. It may cost you more to get it up to code than what you paid for it. Good luck. It already looks like it needs a foundation work.

  • Vanita Mann
    on Oct 17, 2019

    Please let us know if you bought it. Thank you!

  • Fms8399670
    on Oct 22, 2019

    No!cause the money u would put in this house u could do better by trying to buy one

  • Carolyn Arps
    on Nov 21, 2019

    NO

  • Marla
    on Dec 28, 2019

    Yes and the land should be worth it.

  • Michael Okulovich Sr.
    on Jan 22, 2020

    look at foundation see if any more needs fixed or leaks.check the integrity of your floor joist to foundation.look for roit and look at plumbing while there for leaks and lead pipe.look ate drains sewer then electric ,fuse,breakerbox age and amps rating incoming, windows have to be replaced prob. need H/AC then roof don't see elec.weatherhead so bet that's up grade for sure

    gutter falling off bet faceia borad is rotted all around youd be busy

  • Norma Shumate
    on Apr 29, 2020

    Where is corona19 testing in Rutherford county

  • Cee
    on May 20, 2020

    The ex-neighbor must know how much work, time and money is involved. If it's in a prime real estate area, and an inspector says foundation crack is worth fixing, offer to buy it for less. Have the fire department do a controlled burn to get rid of the termites and rebuild a two-story 3-bedroom. Cheaper to build UP than to add on to a foundation. If the foundation is a no go, start from scratch if you got the land for cheap. Even if you do nothing, you can still sell the empty lot for a good price, since it's considered site-ready with water, electric and sewer, etc.

  • Normski
    Just now

    Buy it then sell it as a building plot

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