Repairing rotted door jambs.

My customer had 6 door jambs that had rot in about the same place and size. These were large double door units and I did not want to remove the unit and replace the complete jamb.
My customer had 6 door jambs that had rot in about the same place and size. These were large double door units and I did not want to remove the unit and replace the complete jamb.
I cut out the rotted area and cut the brick molding a little higher than the removed area.
You can buy at the big box store replacement door jambs. I cut and fitted a replacement piece. I have a router bit to cut a slot the thickness of a biscuit. I cleaned the area well and put a bed of caulking in. Then secured the replacement piece with the biscuit, shims, gorilla glue and brads. The brick molding was put on and it covered the slot for the biscuit and gives strength to the repair.
This is the finished repair waiting for paint. The material for this job was less than $75.00, but a lot of labor. I hope that this will help someone in the future.

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  3 questions
  • Nancy Nancy on Jan 02, 2018
    Nice repair job. Did you figure out the reason they were all rotten? No gutters or bad planning of run off water?
  • Katrina A Czachor Katrina A Czachor on Oct 08, 2018

    What if you have a door with the side windows and there is not there as well? Do you have to replace the whole thing or would this work for it? I do not have bricks on my house.

  • James James on Aug 26, 2019

    Every one says replace with vinyl - well look at this rotten vinyl door jam on a potential house purchase? How do you fix vinyl french doors rotten vinyl door jam? Replace or fix?

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  • Marty Marty on Jul 22, 2020

    I've have done this in this manner on several of my door jambs. Turns out fairly well but I see two things in this that I didn't do, both would have helped: (1) Using the biscuit. Has to help alignment of the pieces and keep them from moving a little when nailing, and (2) using a longer piece of the brick molding which also would help keep the pieces lined up.

    I think the rotting is due to the lower edge of the wooden pieces being left unpainted or sealed by the builder, allowing water to wick up. All my replacement parts were vinyl or fully painted.

  • Jim P Jim P on Jul 22, 2020

    This fix may not work on vinyl. The door frames I repaired were wood.

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