Install Your Own Backyard Water Feature In Under 3 Hours

We've been working on our backyard this year, and a water feature was something that we really wanted to add to our space. Although we thought that installing a trio of gurglers would be complicated, we were pleasantly surprised to find that it was a very simple job - we finished in under 3 hours! Read how we did it (and get some of our tips and tricks) on the blog post!
Because we were installing a trio of basalt gurglers (we bought them at Northwest Landscape Supply - http://www.landscapesupply.com/catalog/) we used a three-way splitter with our pump.
This part of the yard used to be inhabited by a huge, ugly shrub. We called it "Jabba the Hut" - and it had to go.

After removing Jabba (see the offending pile of crazy in the background? That's what we ripped up), we dug a hole in the yard that was just deep enough for our reservoir. It sat with just the lip slightly above the ground.
The rocks had to be wheeled around on a dolly. Hernias were not on our 'to-do" list that day.
For tips on how to thread the gurglers with the pump hose and the LED lights, head to the post.
Once we had hooked up the hoses to the pump - and tested them! - we started to cover the reservoir with smooth polished rocks .
Almost beautiful... we just needed to set the stage.
Some lava rock, planters and stepping stones finished the look. Head to the blog post to see how we did it all! Stone sources in the US: http://www.marenakos.com http://www.pacificstoneco.com/home.html
And here it is at night... it's absolutely magical!
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Tara @ Suburble

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

3 of 13 questions
  • Carolyn Chapman Thomas
    on Jul 14, 2018

    Yes! Where did you get a reservoir and did you drill your own rocks?

    • Carol Norton
      on Oct 3, 2018

      Lowe’s and Home Depot carry them in the summer months in the garden center, but most stone companies also carry them. Check out NW Stone near Portland, OR if you’re in that area.

  • Betty
    on Dec 30, 2018

    How did you drill your holes in the rock¿

    • Nunyainct
      on Jul 23, 2020

      I made my own water feature at my house. I live in an area where there are granite boulders. I wheeled them from my property on a dolly and then leveled the bottoms with a framing saw that I put a mason blade on. I then used an angle grinder with a mason blade to finish off areas that needed to be smoothed or leveled. You can rent a drill from a rental place, they have them specifically for stone. In my case, I rented the drill with the mason drill bit which was 28” long, diamond tipped. The drill has a supply line so you can attach your garden hose. It is hard work, I did 4 of them. A 28” to 30” stone with a predrilled hole on line runs 400 dollars and up...and I’ve only seen basalt on line . Granite is nicer. I would also suggest you drill several smaller rocks and run the supply lines through them. You can use liquid nails masonry to attach the stones. Drilling 28” into rock is hard. I stood on a low scaffolding ladder to do it. I’m a 59 year old woman, but I did it and saved thousands doing all the labor myself. Good luck. I’d also say check locally for core driller operations, mason yards, you might find a reasonable guy or supply yard that does side jobs. Nice stuff is expensive and the people who do the work deserve every penny I just didn’t have that kind of money to spend.

  • Vicki
    on Jul 26, 2020

    How did you drill the Rocks?

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