You Can Save That Hosta!

2 Materials
Okay, it is that time of the year and you walk out into your garden and you see your hosta has fallen over and you pick it up to discover that the roots have been eaten. What do you do?
Do not throw it out!
Have you tried to separate your hosta clump and you broke one of the leaves off and it has no roots...
can you save it?
Most likely the answer is YES!
I have have saved hostas for years that have been attacked by voles and other critters and even ones that I have harmed in my quest to divide them. It is so easy to do and only requires (rain) water and a glass jar, vase, or other container.
Voles love the roots of hostas. With this information I know that I have to walk the gardens and pay close attention to any size of distress on any of my plants. If I notice a high activity of moles tunnels (the dogs digging trenches is a sure sign) then I am extra vigilant about walking around checking out my hostas as well as my other plants.
Rooting the hostas takes anywhere from 6-8 weeks so be patient and make sure the water level stays constant in the jar/vase. After it has rooted, then either plant it in a pot or move it back to the ground.
So do not panic if you find a plant distress do not just throw it out!
Happy gardening everyone!
and check out my blog!
6/14/14 first hosta of the season-found this the other day leaning over
Notice there are a few small white roots-this is a great sign! Put this in a vase with just enough water to go about 2" above the roots. In about 6 weeks this will be ready to plant again.
Sitting on my potting bench-patiently waiting and checking for the plants to be ready to either go in a pot or in the ground.
5/21/14 I divided this hosta and these leaves broke off but the crown of the root is still in tact (the end which has no roots that you see here in pic). This is still viable and can easily be rooted without any chemicals.
6/2/14 Roots are appearing-this is exciting when this happens.
6/14/14 Roots have grown about an 1 1/2" now. I will wait another couple weeks to put in a pot. You could even put this in a pot now and keep it moist and do not let it dry out.

The Garden Frog with C Renee
Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!
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Frequently asked questions

Have a question about this project?

3 of 26 questions
  • Judy Judy on Apr 29, 2019

    Any ideas on how to get rid of the moles, they about destroyed my flower beds last year.

  • Shirley Davis Shirley Davis on Apr 29, 2019

    We have chipmunks, how do we get rid of them.

  • Mary pantzis Mary pantzis on May 20, 2020

    please answer me i HAVE ALOT OF HOSTAS BUT THIS YEAR THEY DID NOT COME UP IRGHT AND NOW THE LEAVES ARE DYING WHAT DO I DO I AM READY TO PULL THEM OUT

Comments

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3 of 131 comments
  • Mary Mary on May 01, 2020

    I read to use fish emulsion fertilizer, moles and rabbits hate it


  • Moma Margie Moma Margie on Jun 03, 2021

    lion dung. I picked up some at local zoo ( for a donation). Kept the skunks & racoons away for awhile.

    skunk gone permanently. The racoons eventually figured it out.

    i didnt spread the lion poo. I kept it in a container, in a flower pot. I didnt want strange bacteria in my garden. By keeping it in my pot i could move it away when i wanted to use the garden.

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